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Wild flower   /waɪld flˈaʊər/   Listen
Wild flower

noun
1.
Wild or uncultivated flowering plant.  Synonym: wildflower.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Wild flower" Quotes from Famous Books



... this idle maid espied, She shook her head in warning, and scarce her wrath could hide; For girls were made for housewives, for spinning-wheel and loom, And not to drink the sunshine and wild flower's sweet perfume. ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For • Various

... on in every growing blade of grass and flower. Is it not wonderful to watch the chemical processes in nature's laboratory, mixing and flinging out to the world the gorgeous colorings and marvelous perfumes of the rose and wild flower! No city youth was ever in such a marvelous kindergarten, where perpetual creation is going on in such a ...
— Pushing to the Front • Orison Swett Marden

... and fills all imaginations. So vast is it, and on such a scale of magnitude, that one hardly saw before the delicacy and exquisite adjustment of parts, the marvellous art that framed the smallest leaf and touched the vagrant wild flower still blooming on the edges of the woodland. It is, after all, when the great festival days are over and the thronging crowds have gone, that the true worshipper finds the temple beautiful with the highest visions of worship, and in the silence of deserted ...
— Under the Trees and Elsewhere • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... it came. Indeed, it seemed that there was no end to the ingenious ways of remembering things that Marjorie wanted to remember. A tiny, bright bird feather would recall the walk she took with Grandma one afternoon; a pressed wild flower was an eloquent reminder of Blossom Banks; and a large strawberry hull, neatly pasted into place, Marjorie insisted upon to remind her of the day when ...
— Marjorie's Vacation • Carolyn Wells

... that was around this little fellow in his new home, he was so bravely and beautifully himself—and that only. A wild flower transplanted from the prairie to the hot-house, he retained his prairie habits, unalterably pure and simple, till he died. His leading trait seemed to be a fearless and kindly frankness, willing that everything should be ...
— Behind the Scenes - or, Thirty years a slave, and Four Years in the White House • Elizabeth Keckley

... lately turned seventeen; and before Jack went away to sea—now two years and a month ago—I believe that most of the love-making between them had been conducted through the media of bon-bons and an occasional wild flower, though it ended with farewell tears, a lock of bonnie hair, and a miniature, both of which Jack had taken away with him, and, like a true lover, worn next his heart ...
— As We Sweep Through The Deep • Gordon Stables

... of the all too ample school hours to complete and rectify the work of the home, to make sure of the foundation of sense impressions and elementary capabilities upon which the edifice of schooling is to rise. In America it has grown, as a wild flower transferred to the unaccustomed richness of garden soil will sometimes do, rankly and in relation to the more essential schooling, aggressively, and become a highly vigorous and picturesque weed. One must bear in mind that Froebel's original thought was rather of the mother than of the schoolmistress, ...
— Mankind in the Making • H. G. Wells

... though it's dying hard. But the next time he loves, the girl who treats his love lightly—Let's go down in these woods and look for hepaticas. John can't bring them to me any more and Jeff-Jack never did. He sends candy. There's homage in a wild flower, Barb; but candy, oh—I ...
— John March, Southerner • George W. Cable

... not if I could. I love you the best, my pretty wild flower. I would not exchange you, sweet, for all the world. I have only told you this so you will see why it is necessary to keep our marriage a secret—for the present, ...
— Daisy Brooks - A Perilous Love • Laura Jean Libbey

... enjoying the sunshine. Every now and then she bent down and gathered a wild flower,—the four-leaved yellow potentilla, or the meadow-sweet, or a spike of golden rod, or a handful of forget-me-nots, watered by the stream, to make a little nosegay for her teacher; for Mrs. Mordaunt loved flowers and would sometimes take the lesson for the ...
— Amy Harrison - or Heavenly Seed and Heavenly Dew • Amy Harrison

... white muslin," suggested 'Toinette, struggling in the grasp of the immortal Tod,—"a simple white muslin, with an equally simple wild flower in your hair, a la Amanda Fitzallan. How the Dowager Bilberry would ...
— Vagabondia - 1884 • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... that had a way of sweeping up on gay young wings to sudden joys stirred by the simplest causes. Her outlook on life was as gallant as that of a fine-tempered schoolboy. A gallop in the Park could whip the flag of happiness into her cheeks. A wild flower nestling in a bed of moss could bring the quick light to her eyes. Her responsiveness was a continual delight to him just as her culture was his despair. Of books, pictures, and music she ...
— The Big-Town Round-Up • William MacLeod Raine

... changed to whiplashes and puffs of wind that curled the black hair forward over her unhatted face in a frame. Wayland looked at her and felt his masterdom going to those same winds; for the pace had painted her ivory cheeks, not rose color, but the deep flame of the wild flower. Some day, perhaps,—no matter; he set his teeth and screwed the whipcord muscles taut; for the moraine stones had begun to roll, and there was a zig-zag flash of lightning that sent fire balls sizzling over the rock. He braced her to the leap down the steep sliding ...
— The Freebooters of the Wilderness • Agnes C. Laut

... the autumn sun there came up the stream overlooked by the Sun Rock one day a man, a woman and a child in a canoe. Civilization had done for lovely Joan what it had done for many another wild flower transplanted from the depths of the wilderness. Her cheeks were thin. Her blue eyes had lost their luster. She coughed, and when she coughed the man looked at her with love and fear in his eyes. But now, slowly, ...
— Kazan • James Oliver Curwood

... flower. Consequently, as it is only by their natural influence that flowers can address the mind through the eye, we must read Shelley, to learn how to use flowers, and Shakspeare, to learn to love them. In both writers we find the wild flower possessing soul as well as life, and mingling its influence most intimately, like an untaught melody, with the deepest and most secret ...
— The Poetry of Architecture • John Ruskin

... A little by-way brought us to a bank of the Gave: in a long pool of water was growing an army of reeds twice the height of a man; their grayish spikes and their trembling leaves bent and whispered under the wind; a wild flower near by ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume 4 (of 10) • Various

... There surely is a market, and a profitable one if rightly managed. And with right management and profit is to come desire to have improved varieties. Such varieties can be developed at least as readily as the wonderful modern chrysanthemum has been developed from an insignificant little wild flower not half as interesting or promising originally as our common oxeye ...
— Culinary Herbs: Their Cultivation Harvesting Curing and Uses • M. G. Kains

... to do everything and go everywhere at fever heat—something more than the very epitome of triumphant youth as clean and sweet as apple blossoms, with whom to flirt and pose as being the blase man of the world, the Mr. Know-All of civilization, a wild flower in a hot house. Attracted at once by her exquisite coloring and delicious profile, and amused by her imperative manner and intolerant point of view, he had now begun to be piqued and intrigued by ...
— Who Cares? • Cosmo Hamilton

... really about to breathe and put out its hand, that wonderful vagueness of Michelangelo akin to nature, by which he attained the same life giving effect, a something more than mere form, bloomed in Luca's work like a new wild flower. Expression, life, the power to express the spirit in marble and terra-cotta, these are what he really discovered, and not the mere material of his art, that painted earthenware, as ...
— Florence and Northern Tuscany with Genoa • Edward Hutton

... thickest in the beechwoods around the Harbour Head, and where the best trouting places up the brooks were. He could mimic the call of any wild bird or beast in Four Winds and he knew the haunt of every wild flower from spring to autumn. ...
— Rainbow Valley • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... was a rare spectacle to behold the great Peter and his loyal follower hailing the morning sun, and rejoicing in the clear countenance of Nature, as they pranced it through the pastoral scenes of Bloemen Dael; which in those days was a sweet and rural valley, beautiful with many a bright wild flower, refreshed by many a pure streamlet, and enlivened here and there by a delectable little Dutch cottage, sheltered under some sloping hill, and almost ...
— Knickerbocker's History of New York, Complete • Washington Irving

... with Touchstone on a bus From Ludgate Hill to World's End. It was he! Despite the broadcloth and the bowler hat, I knew him, Touchstone, the wild flower of folly, The whetstone of his age, the scourge of kings, The madcap morning star of elfin-land, Who used to wrap his legs around his neck For warmth on winter nights. He had slipped back, To see what men were doing in a world That should be wiser. He had watched a ...
— The New Morning - Poems • Alfred Noyes

... can't find a better, 'T was used by a king for securing a letter. My Second, whose blossoms of yellow soon fade, Comes out every night in the calm evening shade. My Third, oft called Iris, is much in demand, It grows on an island named Van Diemen's Land. My Fourth, a wild flower with sweet golden eye, Is more blessing than "torment" to all who pass by. My Fifth, with great trusses of lavender hue, Is the sweetest of shrubs that the spring brings to view. My Sixth, an old blossom in medicine once famed, Was good for the eyesight, and thus it was named. Now ...
— The Manor House School • Angela Brazil

... another even as God hath forgiven you in Christ." She wished that she too might go through the Garden of Good Intentions whilst flowers sprang up and birds sang sweetly round about her. But what could she do, what deed of kindness perform, however small, that might perhaps bloom as a wild flower by the wayside to ...
— Peggy-Alone • Mary Agnes Byrne

... and began to wish most enthusiastically for some romantic admirer; some one who would expose himself to the danger of a sore throat and influenza for the sake of serenading me—who would be rather glad than otherwise to risk his life by jumping down a precipice to bring me some descried wild flower, and who, when away from me, would pass his time in writing extravagant poetry, of which I was to be the bright divinity. Old as I am, I feel almost ashamed to repeat this nonsense now; and had I then possessed more sense myself, or made ...
— A Grandmother's Recollections • Ella Rodman

... last time I had the pleasure of see you in your place, Villa Collina Ridente, you exclaimed with a melancholic voice, "Only poppies and mignonette came out of the wild flower seeds." "So it is," said I in the same tune of voice. Time proved we was both wrong; many other flowers made their retarded appearance, so deserving the name ...
— The Smiling Hill-Top - And Other California Sketches • Julia M. Sloane

... in a grain of sand, And a heaven in a wild flower; Hold infinity in the palm of your hand, And eternity in ...
— The Fortunate Youth • William J. Locke

... glorified everything; the fields looked soft, the moss and lichens on the rocks were moist and fresh coloured, grey and green and brown; the buds and young leafage of the trees were of every lovely hue and shade that young vegetation can take; and here and there Esther found a wild flower. When she found one, it was very apt to be taken up by the roots with her little trowel, and bestowed in her basket for careful transport home; and on the so endangered beauties in her basket Esther looked down from time to time with ...
— A Red Wallflower • Susan Warner

... spring a race is run with the hepatica, arbutus, adder's tongue, blood-root, squirrel corn, and anemone for the honor of being the earliest wild flower; and although John Burroughs and Dr. Abbott have had the exceptional experience of finding the claytonia even before the hepatica - certainly the earliest spring blossom worthy the name in the Middle ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... its sheltered hollow. There is one "new" rhododendron, which the writer saw recently in such a situation, but of which he does not recollect the name, which has masses of wax-like, pale sulphur flowers, which are mirrored in a miniature pool set almost at its foot. This half-wild flower garden pertains mainly to the banks of the brook gully, and not to the banks of the brook itself. It is in the latter, by the waterside, that the special charm of these gardens should be found. It is the nature of such places to have a strip of level ground opposite to each ...
— The Naturalist on the Thames • C. J. Cornish

... the afternoon had come. There she was fresh, free, like a hardy wild flower. She trotted back and forth, curtseying, chattering, with her merry heels clicking on the tiling. The hot sausages and Lebkuchen and a stein were hastened in, and she switched her short skirts down cosily ...
— Villa Elsa - A Story of German Family Life • Stuart Henry

... is a small white flower with a pink border. It is the earliest blooming wild flower on the shores of Lake Superior, and ...
— Indian Legends of Minnesota • Various

... boyhood's painless play, Sleep that wakes in laughing day, Health that mocks the doctor's rules, Knowledge never learned in schools, Of the wild bee's morning chase, Of the wild flower's time and place, How the tortoise bears his shell, How ...
— Graded Memory Selections • Various

... architecture, of a different order from the noble theme of Maybeck's Fine Arts Palace, but none the less poetry. This is a sylvan idyll, telling of lofty trees, cool shades, and secret bowers of fern and vine and wild flower, in the moist and tangled redwood forests. There is little used but rough-barked tree trunks, but what delicate harmony ...
— The Jewel City • Ben Macomber

... that the work was interrupted. For I drew, then, very delicately; and should have made a pretty book if I could have got peace. Even yet, I can manage my point a little, and would far rather be making outlines of flowers, than writing; and I meant to have drawn every English and Scottish wild flower, like this cluster of bog heather opposite,[4]—back, and profile, and front. But 'Blackwood's {10} Magazine,' with its insults to Turner, dragged me into controversy; and I have not had, properly ...
— Proserpina, Volume 1 - Studies Of Wayside Flowers • John Ruskin

... and everything pertaining to country life. It was impossible for him to stand and look at others who were at work in the garden. He would throw off his coat, seize the spade or the hoe, and go to work himself with the most intense relish. Not the most minute little wild flower ever escaped his notice, or was ruthlessly trodden under foot; but, stooping down, he would take up the tiny thing, and hold it up for admiration, seeming to think that others could not but admire it as he did. Oh, my husband! how sweet ...
— A Biographical Sketch of the Life and Character of Joseph Charless - In a Series of Letters to his Grandchildren • Charlotte Taylor Blow Charless

... see a World in a grain of sand, And a Heaven in a wild flower, Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand, And Eternity ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... girls say that the violets are out and we do want to have a wild flower hunting picnic up Clearwater! May we? And may ...
— Mary Jane: Her Book • Clara Ingram Judson

... a silence a fourth airman spoke, seated before the hangar and studying a wild flower, the petals of which he had been examining with the peculiar interest ...
— In Secret • Robert W. Chambers

... is the one passion that can neither be wrested from fate or bribed into life. It must spring up from the heart, like a wild flower from seed God plants in virgin forest soil, to bring contentment with its blossoming. The sunshine which falls upon it must be pure and bright from heaven. Plant it in an atmosphere of sin, and that which might have been a holy passion ...
— The Old Countess; or, The Two Proposals • Ann S. Stephens

... universal elements enough; to find the air and the water exhilarating; to be refreshed by a morning walk or an evening saunter; to find a quest of wild berries more satisfying than a gift of tropic fruit; to be thrilled by the stars at night; to be elated over a bird's nest, or over a wild flower in spring—these are some of the rewards ...
— Our Friend John Burroughs • Clara Barrus

... the last few years a political significance and popularity have attached themselves to the Primrose beyond every other British wild flower. It arouses the patriotism of the large Conservative party, and enlists the favour of many others who thoughtlessly follow an attractive fashion, and who love the first fruits of early Spring. Botanically the Primrose has two varieties of floral structure: one "pin-eyed," ...
— Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure • William Thomas Fernie

... schools, that delights us. As the wild duck is more swift and beautiful than the tame, so is the wild—the mallard—thought, which 'mid falling dews wings its way above the fens. A truly good book is something as natural, and as unexpectedly and unaccountably fair and perfect, as a wild flower discovered on the prairies of the West or in the jungles of the East. Genius is a light which makes the darkness visible, like the lightning's flash, which perchance shatters the temple of knowledge itself,—and not a taper lighted at the hearth-stone ...
— Excursions • Henry D. Thoreau

... engaging, pretty, naive, little woman this was! I commented inwardly. A sweet aroma of feminine health breathed from her body, bosom, hair—a tumbly black mass—as perfume breathes from a wild flower. ...
— Tramping on Life - An Autobiographical Narrative • Harry Kemp

... relations at Earlscombe, and for a time lodged with his grandmother there. When his shyness and lumpishness gave way, he proved so bright that Emily undertook to carry on his education. He soon had a wonderful eye for a wild flower, and would climb after it with the utmost agility; and when once his tongue was loosed, he became almost too communicative, and made us acquainted with the opinions of 'they Earlscoom folk' with a freedom not to be found in an elder ...
— Chantry House • Charlotte M. Yonge

... glorifies mankind: could I dwell here; Here feed on this accumulated wealth, Like senseless swine on acorns of the wood, And own no wish to render thanks in kind? Surely there could be found some waste wild flower To yield one honey-drop that I might drain To ...
— My Beautiful Lady. Nelly Dale • Thomas Woolner

... upon the tree utters the meaning of the wind—a voice of the grass and wild flower, words of the green leaf; they speak through that slender tone. Sweetness of dew and rifts of sunshine, the dark hawthorn touched with breadths of open bud, the odor of the air, the color of the daffodil—all that is delicious and beloved ...
— Birds Illustrated by Color Photography, Vol. II., No. 5, November 1897 - A Monthly Serial designed to Promote Knowledge of Bird-Life • Various

... coming, it seemed almost insupportable, as we were obliged to have a fire in the close room, in order to cook our provisions. I consoled myself as well as I could by roaming about the fields and woods, and making acquaintance with every wild flower as it blossomed, and in writing long letters to home friends, in which I abused one of the finest countries in the world as the worst that God ever called out of chaos. I can recall to memory, at this moment, the few lines of a poem which commenced in this strain; nor am I ...
— Roughing it in the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... last she loved a youth, who chose To keep this wild flower for his own, He in his garden set his rose Where it might bloom for ...
— India's Love Lyrics • Adela Florence Cory Nicolson (AKA Laurence Hope), et al.

... of it?" asked Ethel Brown, on her knees taking up some of the plants with her trowel and placing them in her basket so carefully that there was plenty of earth surrounding each one to serve as a nest when it should be put into Helen's wild flower bed. ...
— Ethel Morton's Enterprise • Mabell S.C. Smith

... with profuse and luxuriant vegetation. How strange to see the humming-bird dart like a streak of golden light among the fragrant shrubs; stranger still to see the butterfly, attracted by the lines of some stray wild flower, flutter away again, repelled by the chilling neighbourhood of the last remnant of a snow-drift lying in a sheltered corner, where no sunbeam ever ...
— The King's Warrant - A Story of Old and New France • Alfred H. Engelbach

... a real treat to the children to be fairly outside the town, among green fields and pleasant woods. Mrs. Lee had to keep her head bobbing this way and that way, to see a flock of turkeys that made Meg laugh; or a wild flower that pleased Hatty; or a "pretty moo cow" that Harry thought ...
— Hatty and Marcus - or, First Steps in the Better Path • Aunt Friendly

... unfitting for you, were it not that you laboured in a great cause; but it must soon be decided, and then that fair lily shall be transplanted, like a wild flower from the rock, and be nurtured ...
— Snarley-yow - or The Dog Fiend • Frederick Marryat

... girl, whose father is a magnate among his neighbors in the Orkney Islands. Sheila is won by a Londoner—Lavender by name—who visits her island home. He transplants the Northern wild flower into a London home, where she pines for a while, homesick and heart-sick. In time, her sound sense enables her to adjust herself to altered conditions, and her stronger nature raises and ennobles her husband's.—William Black, A ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook, Vol. 3 • E. Cobham Brewer

... scene, that in this, more properly and perfectly than in any other temple, may the spirit of man recognise and hold familiar and free converse with the spirit of his Creator. Here, indeed, without much effort of the imagination; might be beheld the present God—the trees, hills and vales, the wild flower and the murmuring water, all the work of his hands, attesting his power, keeping their purpose, and obeying, without scruple, the order of those seasons, for the sphere and operation of which he originally designed them. They were mute lessoners, and the example which, in the ...
— Guy Rivers: A Tale of Georgia • William Gilmore Simms

... been on the ranch about a month, and were liking it more and more every day, Bert and Nan asked their mother if they could ride on their ponies across the fields to gather a new kind of wild flower a cowboy ...
— The Bobbsey Twins in the Great West • Laura Lee Hope

... painless play, Sleep that wakes in laughing day, Health that mocks the doctor's rules, Knowledge never learned of schools: Of the wild bee's morning chase, Of the wild flower's time and place, Flight of fowl, and habitude Of the tenants of the wood; How the tortoise ...
— Twilight Stories • Various

... only follow with their eyes, so closely guarded were they by the elder women. Old men jogged along in groups, talking to each other, their lariats dragging through the grass, now and then snapping off the head of a wild flower or catching in a tangle of weeds. Boys made the air ring with their laughter, as they slipped off their ponies to shoot their small arrows at some imaginary game. It was a scene full of careless pleasure and happy movement under ...
— Indian Story and Song - from North America • Alice C. Fletcher

... The long journey and the strange new life would kill thee, Wildenai." Having once begun he stumbled on, but half aware of how each word he uttered hurt her, eager only to have done with the whole sorry scene. "Thou art but a little wild flower. Thou couldst not live away from this, thy sunny island. Can'st thou ...
— Their Mariposa Legend • Charlotte Herr

... Accorded with his wonted courtesy, Courtesy with a touch of traitor in it, And stayed; and cast his eyes on fair Elaine: Where could be found face daintier? then her shape From forehead down to foot, perfect—again From foot to forehead exquisitely turned: 'Well—if I bide, lo! this wild flower for me!' And oft they met among the garden yews, And there he set himself to play upon her With sallying wit, free flashes from a height Above her, graces of the court, and songs, Sighs, and slow smiles, and golden eloquence And amorous adulation, till the maid Rebelled against it, saying ...
— Idylls of the King • Alfred, Lord Tennyson

... collection of the rare birds of the country, all of which he knows. In a separate cage are two fine eagles. Among the flowers I noticed the "Sturt Desert Pea," just then in blossom, the loveliest wild flower of Australia. I have seen houses larger and finer, no doubt, and better collections of particular objects, but never any place so perfect of its kind. Some lines from the "Palace of Art" involuntarily occurred to me, but to no man does the moral of Tennyson's ...
— Six Letters From the Colonies • Robert Seaton

... sculptured urn and storied monument nothing more than symbols of family pride? Is all I see around me a memorial of the living more than of the dead, an empty show of sorrow, which thus vaunts itself in mournful pageant and funeral parade? Is it indeed true, as some have said, that the simple wild flower which springs spontaneously upon the grave, and the rose which the hand of affection plants there, are fitter objects wherewith to adorn the narrow house? No! I feel that it is not so! Let the good and the great be honored even in the ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. X (of X) - America - II, Index • Various

... varieties instead of seven. As we know, the hooded character already exists. It is recessive to the erect standard, and we have reason to suppose that it arose as a sudden sport by the omission of the factor in whose presence the standard assumes the erect shape characteristic of the wild flower. It is largely by keeping his eyes open and seizing upon such sports for crossing purposes that the horticulturist "improves" the plants with which he deals. How these sports or mutations come about we can now surmise. They must owe their origin to a disturbance in the processes of ...
— Mendelism - Third Edition • Reginald Crundall Punnett

... great pleasure to a countryman, though these sounds have not the quality of real music. It is the same with the call of the migrating geese or the voice of any wild thing: our pleasure in them is entirely apart from any considerations of music. Why does the wild flower, as we chance upon it in the woods or bogs, give us more pleasure than the more elaborate flower of the garden or lawn? Because it comes as a surprise, offers a greater contrast with its surroundings, and suggests a spirit in wild nature ...
— Ways of Nature • John Burroughs

... conversation in which Vanessa's native Jewish wit was beginning to tell against the more homely gifts of the rest of the party, Leonetta would suddenly fall back, stand in an attitude of rapt attention over a brook, a well, a wild flower, a plank bridge, a pool, or anything; and, at a signal from her, the three men of the party would quickly rally to her halting place, and enter heartily into whatever spirit the object contemplated was ...
— Too Old for Dolls - A Novel • Anthony Mario Ludovici

... mustn't love her. But if you marry a woman without loving her, I hope you'll not deny you're doing a very shocking thing. If, on the contrary, you do love her, raison de plus for not marrying her Fancy marrying a woman you love; and then, day by day, watching the beautiful wild flower of love fatten into a domestic cabbage! Isn't that ...
— Grey Roses • Henry Harland

... reed shaken by the wind. Long after then, he said that something in her voice had first appealed to him. Her soft eyes were, indeed, of those that quicken the hearts of men. It is doubtful if there were, in all the world, a lovelier thing than that wild flower of girlhood up there in the hills. She was no dream of romance, dear reader. In one of the public buildings of a certain capital her portrait has been hanging these forty years, and wins, from all who pass it, the homage of ...
— Darrel of the Blessed Isles • Irving Bacheller

... the wild flower out by the roots. "It struggles—and struggles—and blooms for a day—and withers. What's the use?" she demanded, almost savagely. Then, before he could answer, the girl closed the door she had opened for him. "We must be moving. The sun has already ...
— The Sheriff's Son • William MacLeod Raine

... desolate and still. They went from one deserted house to another, marvelling at their quaint simplicity, and debating which they should choose. And at last, in a sunlit corner of a room that had lost its outer wall, they came upon a wild flower, a little flower of blue that the weeders of the Food Company ...
— Tales of Space and Time • Herbert George Wells

... sullen, defiant, and lowering, seemed uninviting, these were occasionally broken into charmingly alluring coves floored with golden sand, clad with evergreen shrubbery, and adorned with every variety of indigenous wattle, she-oak, wild flower, and fern, from the delicately graceful 'maiden-hair' to the palm-like 'old man'; while the majestic gum-tree, clean and smooth as the mast of 'some tall admiral' pierces the clear air to the height of ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... violet, and also the earliest wild flower of this section, Erigenia, or "daughter of the early spring" [a species of groundsel]. We have had crocuses and daffodils ever since Christmas. I have lots of pets. We have nine cats. One is fourteen years old. And we have a shepherd dog that has ...
— Harper's Young People, March 30, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... have fallen out then," said Betty, half to herself, and with a demure satisfaction in her wild flower face. "I am glad of it, for I like him not. Thanks, good fellow, for your answering ...
— Prisoners of Hope - A Tale of Colonial Virginia • Mary Johnston

... from the city to the country is now favourably known as a grower of flowering plants for marketing. She began as a student of wild flowers and became a wild flower specialist. The first money she made from flowers was earned as the result of her wish to give to a missionary society. She bought seeds from a reliable dealer, parcelled them out in selected varieties, ...
— The Canadian Girl at Work - A Book of Vocational Guidance • Marjory MacMurchy

... knapweeds, the blue scabious, the yellow rattles, sweeping so close and true that nothing escaped; and, yet although I had seen so many hundreds of each, although I had lifted armfuls day after day, still they were fresh. They never lost their newness, and even now each time I gather a wild flower it feels a new thing. The greenfinches came to the fallen swathe so near to us they seemed to have no fear; but I remember the yellowhammers most, whose colour, like that of the wild flowers and the sky, has never faded from my memory. The greenfinches sank into the fallen swathe, the loose grass ...
— The Open Air • Richard Jefferies

... in front of the house and about the grounds, or will they be swept away with all the beautiful mosses and ferns and wild geraniums and other flowers which their rude construction suffered and encouraged to grow among them. This little wild flower, Poor Robin, is here constantly courting my attention and exciting what may be called a domestic interest in the varying aspect of its stalks and leaves and flowers." I hope no Englishman meditating to reside on the grounds now sacred to ...
— Flowers and Flower-Gardens • David Lester Richardson

... the three,—Herminie, she might be about sixteen,—was a charming girl, a true child of Nature, fresh as a wild flower, awaking and rising every day of the year from her peaceful happy couch with the birds of heaven, always smiling and singing. Herminie was the joy, the favourite of the old man,—she was the linnet, the ...
— Le Morvan, [A District of France,] Its Wild Sports, Vineyards and Forests; with Legends, Antiquities, Rural and Local Sketches • Henri de Crignelle

... summer board at the Fountain Hotel, but they were not yet out of their dens. We saw the track of only one, and he was not making for the hotel. At all the formations where the geysers are, the ground was bare over a large area. I even saw a wild flower—an early buttercup, not an inch high—in bloom. This seems to be the earliest wild flower in the Rockies. It is the only fragrant ...
— Camping with President Roosevelt • John Burroughs

... that hillside and in the woods over beyond—'t was out last week, some of it, I happened to notice"—this in the apologetic tone of one who admits a weakness—"guess you'll find all you want." I venture to say that of no other wild flower, except those which work specific harm or good, could ...
— More Jonathan Papers • Elisabeth Woodbridge

... was much delighted at the idea of seeing the little nest and eggs, and Mrs. Frazer said, "There is a wild flower [Footnote: Noli me tangere, Canadian Balsam.] that is known to the Canadians by the name of the Humming-flower, on account of the fondness which those birds evince for it. This plant grows on the moist banks of creeks. It is very beautiful, of a bright orange-scarlet colour. The stalks and ...
— Lady Mary and her Nurse • Catharine Parr Traill

... of the Classes, and there is surprising responsiveness sometimes, where one would least expect it. We have known a Tamil woman, distinctly of the Masses, never secluded in her girlhood, but left to bloom as a wild flower in the field, as sensitive in spirit as any lady born. The people are rough and rustic in their ways, but there are certain laws observed which show a spirit of refinement latent among them; there are customs which compare favourably with the customs of the masses at home. As a whole, ...
— Things as They Are - Mission Work in Southern India • Amy Wilson-Carmichael

... perfectly right. She told me long ago, Piney, before I ever knew you, that you knew where every single wild flower bloomed in all Gilead Township, and every cow ...
— Kit of Greenacre Farm • Izola Forrester

... has brought out everything together in the most wonderful manner. The foliage of many trees is hardly out yet, but there are all the fruit-trees in fullest blossom—the lilacs and peonies out—the thorns only beginning and every wild flower in profusion—the grass splendidly green, and a fragrance about everything which is too delicious; and the birds singing most beautifully. The nightingales were last night ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume III (of 3), 1854-1861 • Queen of Great Britain Victoria

... his ivory roofs; here, arch upon arch, pillar on pillar, glittered to the world the golden palace of its master,—the Golden House of Nero. How the lizard watches us with his bright, timorous eye! We disturb his reign. Gather that wild flower: the Golden House is vanished, but the wild flower may have kin to those which the stranger's hand scattered over the tyrant's grave; see, over this soil, the grave of Rome, Nature strews ...
— Zanoni • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... world what is so arbitrary as honour?' cried Counsellor. 'Honour is a wild flower; God plants it, but man prunes it, and the devil only can be responsible for the sports one sometimes meets with. Well, go your own and the devil's way!' The Major turned irritably round. 'In my creed a man's first ...
— A Modern Mercenary • Kate Prichard and Hesketh Vernon Hesketh-Prichard

... wide world rings In mock of this belief, it brings Nor fear, nor grief, nor vain, perplexity. So will I build my altar in the fields, And the blue sky my fretted dome shall be, And the sweet fragrance that the wild flower yields Shall be the incense I will yield to Thee, Thee only God! and thou shalt not despise Even me, the priest of this ...
— Poems of Coleridge • Coleridge, ed Arthur Symons

... rather modestly permitted us to see, his nearly finished canoe, it was like a first glimpse of some new and unknown genius of the woods or streams. It sat there on the chips and shavings and fragments of bark like some shy delicate creature just emerged from its hiding-place, or like some wild flower just opened. It was the first boat of the kind I had ever seen, and it filled my eye completely. What woodcraft it indicated, and what a wild free life, sylvan life, it promised! It had such a fresh, aboriginal look as I had never before seen in any kind of handiwork. ...
— Birds and Bees, Sharp Eyes and, Other Papers • John Burroughs



Words linked to "Wild flower" :   Collinsia heterophylla, scarlet bugler, Arnica montana, Penstemon cyananthus, white-rayed mule's ears, maiden blue-eyed Mary, hairy golden aster, Wyethia amplexicaulis, Machaeranthera tanacetifolia, Indian pipe, tahoka daisy, Lewisia rediviva, Tetraneuris acaulis, engelmannia, goldenrod, lowbush penstemon, trailing four o'clock, shrubby penstemon, butterweed, flowering plant, goldfields, Davidson's penstemon, Parnassia fimbriata, coast boykinia, woolly sunflower, edelweiss, false mitrewort, bitterroot, hot-rock penstemon, sand verbena, blazing star, Calyptridium umbellatum, false chamomile, Parry's penstemon, Tanacetum douglasii, goldenbush, Lithophragma parviflorum, pinesap, woolly daisy, north island edelweiss, Penstemon whippleanus, old man of the mountain, Wyethia helianthoides, pasque flower, Penstemon davidsonii, red maids, Penstemon barbatus, Hymenoxys acaulis, Ranunculus glaberrimus, coneflower, alpine gold, Penstemon newberryi, alpine hulsea, Daucus carota, balloon flower, Haplopappus acaulis, gaillardia, Platte River penstemon, Eriophyllum wallacei, Leptarrhena pyrolifolia, Arnica cordifolia, stemless golden weed, Monotropa hypopithys, brittle bush, Monotropa uniflora, Stenotus acaulis, meadow salsify, Tetraneuris grandiflora, golden-beard penstemon, hawk's-beard, redmaids, gayfeather, sticky aster, sunray, yellow salsify, Encelia farinosa, scented penstemon, Talinum aurantiacum, Machaeranthera bigelovii, Hulsea algida, heliopsis, tulip gentian, siskiyou lewisia, Sarcodes sanguinea, cliff penstemon, Lewisia cotyledon, dwarf daisy, Allionia incarnata, common madia, fringed grass of Parnassus, gay-feather, Rydberg's penstemon, pasqueflower, pussy's-paw, Jones' penstemon, brittlebush, Spraguea umbellatum, ragwort, hawk's-beards, Calandrinia ciliata, Penstemon centranthifolius, prairie golden aster, trailing windmills, Chrysopsis villosa, prairie star, flameflower, blackfoot daisy, flame-flower, common tarweed, flame flower, northern dune tansy, Hymenoxys grandiflora, meadow rue, mule's ears, angiosperm, Heterotheca villosa, Collinsia verna, Boykinia elata, bluebell, Queen Anne's lace, rock penstemon, Penstemon parryi, Penstemon deustus, tansy leaf aster, pussy-paws, purple chinese houses, painted cup, Enceliopsis nudicaulis, Senecio glabellus, Lasthenia chrysostoma, Penstemon linarioides, sagebrush buttercup, stemless hymenoxys, Boykinia occidentalis, Penstemon rupicola, Gerea canescens, Mojave aster, false alumroot, Machaeranthera tortifoloia, mountain pride, incienso, Eustoma grandiflorum, prairie gentian, snakeroot, goatsbeard, nodding groundsel, Penstemon rydbergii, alpine sunflower, Hulsea nana, false miterwort, Antheropeas wallacei, Tiarella unifoliata, Senecio bigelovii, Senecio triangularis, Melampodium leucanthum, fringe cups, oxeye, arrowleaf groundsel, Penstemon dolius, kitten-tails, desert sunflower, Indian paintbrush, Collinsia bicolor, Collinsia parviflora, Tragopogon pratensis, blue-eyed Mary, narrow-leaf penstemon, golden aster, Penstemon palmeri, Tellima grandiflora, Tragopogon dubius, wild carrot, button snakeroot, waxflower, heartleaf arnica, Leucogenes leontopodium, pussy-paw, dwarf hulsea, false beachdrops, Penstemon serrulatus, snow plant, Leontopodium alpinum, Whipple's penstemon, hawkbit, wilding, fleabane, innocense, cascade penstemon, shepherd's clock, Madia elegans, leatherleaf saxifrage, Penstemon fruticosus



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