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Tire   /tˈaɪər/   Listen
Tire

verb
(past & past part. tired; pres. part. tiring)
1.
Lose interest or become bored with something or somebody.  Synonyms: fatigue, jade, pall, weary.
2.
Exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress.  Synonyms: fag, fag out, fatigue, jade, outwear, tire out, wear, wear down, wear out, wear upon, weary.
3.
Deplete.  Synonyms: exhaust, play out, run down, sap.  "We quickly played out our strength"
4.
Cause to be bored.  Synonym: bore.



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"Tire" Quotes from Famous Books



... up which we won our slow passage, the great beetling cliffs dark in shadows, and crowned by trees, the jutting rocks whitened by spray, the headlands cutting off all view ahead, then suddenly receding to permit of our circling on into the unknown—here extended a panorama of which I could never tire. ...
— Beyond the Frontier • Randall Parrish

... poor, we expected delay, And the usual livestock obstructed the way. At Boom we ran over a large yellow dog, At Dueffeld a chicken, at Mecheln a hog; What else, we'd no time to slow down to inquire; At Aerschot, confound it! we blew out a tire. ...
— A line-o'-verse or two • Bert Leston Taylor

... with Le Gardeur some day, when she should tire of the whirl of fashion, had been a pleasant fancy of Angelique. She had no fear of losing her power over him: she held him by the very heart-strings, and she knew it. She might procrastinate, play ...
— The Golden Dog - Le Chien d'Or • William Kirby

... Seeing the sage, all think they see a squire, Companion, lady-love, or absent friend; Whatever is each several wight's desire: Since to our scope our wishes never tend. Hence searching every where, themselves they tire With labour sore, and frustrate of their end; And cannot, (so Desire and Hope deceive), Without the missing good, that ...
— Orlando Furioso • Lodovico Ariosto

... and she felt so helpless. She longed to urge her deer to go faster. She could not do that. He was keeping his place with difficulty. She could only sit and hope that somehow the wolf-leader would tire ...
— The Blue Envelope • Roy J. Snell

... said Varney immediately, "are not going out for some time yet. Oh, a long, long time! These poor fellows you speak of will tire of waiting long before that. And when ...
— Captivating Mary Carstairs • Henry Sydnor Harrison

... the air, can one seize the sea, can one grasp the fire? Even so intangible to me the answer to my desire. The elements we feel and see shift and drift and suspire And we therein behind the screen, with glimmering brains that tire. That is all! Nor can I fall now in the race. As a second breath to a runner comes my soul takes up the pace— For I dreamed the world ran with me in a ...
— Perpetual Light • William Rose Benet

... silence, I remembered that Richard's rubber boots leaked, and I wondered if Martha Corkle would discover it, or if he was paddling about getting his feet wet and bringing on a sore throat. But when I got home Evan said he had sent the boots to the bicycle tire mender's the morning I came away. It was the third night of my stay, and he would not have known what to make of it if I had not raised some sort of ...
— People of the Whirlpool • Mabel Osgood Wright

... sent forth these rivers; they follow the law of Varuna. They tire not, they cease not; like birds they ...
— India: What can it teach us? - A Course of Lectures Delivered before the University Of Cambridge • F. Max Mueller

... should have one of Dinsmore's Tire Shrinkers. Send for circular to R.H. Allen & Co., Postoffice ...
— Scientific American, Vol.22, No. 1, January 1, 1870 • Various

... was no change about him, unless it were from grave to gay. He was serious by months, and jolly by weeks. He had, early in their acquaintance, formed an attachment for Marmaduke Temple, who was the only man that could not speak High Dutch that ever gained his en tire confidence Four times in each year, at periods equidistant, he left his low stone dwelling on the banks of the Mohawk, and travelled thirty miles, through the hills, to the door of the mansion-house in Templeton. Here he generally ...
— The Pioneers • James Fenimore Cooper

... raced desperately. The sun beat on her bare head and hands. Just when she was choking with dust, and almost prostrate with heat and exhaustion—crash, she ran into a broken bottle. Snap! went the tire; the wheel swerved and pitched over. The Angel rolled into the thick yellow dust of ...
— Freckles • Gene Stratton-Porter

... it?" asked the father, with a certain cold contempt in his tone. "You have not yet lived; and you have certainly not laboured. Rest is for those who have laboured and grown weary. In that rest that you desire you would have an empty mind for showman, and of its meagre entertainment you would tire as speedily as a child. Live first, and watch the puppets of memory play afterwards. The fields of amaranth will wait for you however ...
— Drolls From Shadowland • J. H. Pearce

... onward in a silent file. Hour after hour they traveled without speaking. The moon was out, but they kept to the deepest parts of the forest and its rays rarely reached them. They used the long running walk of the frontiersman and their toughened muscles seemed never to tire. Every one of them breathed regularly and easily, but the miles dropped fast behind them. They leaped little brooks, and twice they waded creeks, in one of which the water went far past their knees, but their buckskin trousers dried upon them as they ran on. The moon went behind floating ...
— The Border Watch - A Story of the Great Chief's Last Stand • Joseph A. Altsheler

... scene was continuing in the sala. The unfortunate fellow, overcome with pain, had become silent and waited for his punishers to tire. At last, the soldier breathless, let fall his arm. The alferez, pale with wrath and astonishment, made a signal for them ...
— Friars and Filipinos - An Abridged Translation of Dr. Jose Rizal's Tagalog Novel, - 'Noli Me Tangere.' • Jose Rizal

... women who read this history also take the wise words to heart? Favour is deceitful. To be praised is not enough to satisfy a woman's heart alone. To be admired and flattered may be pleasant while it lasts; but it does not last long. People soon tire of their favourites, and cast them aside for new ones; and then there is desolation indeed in the hearts of those that have been carelessly rejected. And beauty is vain. It is often a snare to its possessor. The love which owes its being to nothing besides is not particularly ...
— Grace Darling - Heroine of the Farne Islands • Eva Hope

... the story may tire us— First graven in symbols of stone— Rewritten on scrolls of papyrus And parchment, and scattered and blown By the winds of the tongues of all nations, Like a litter of leaves wildly whirled Down the rack of a hundred translations, From the earliest ...
— Afterwhiles • James Whitcomb Riley

... grown worse. What is the matter with me? The bromide does me no good, and the shower-baths have no effect whatever. Sometimes, in order to tire myself out, though I am fatigued enough already, I go for a walk in the forest of Roumare. I used to think at first that the fresh light and soft air, impregnated with the odor of herbs and leaves, would ...
— Library of the World's Best Mystery and Detective Stories • Edited by Julian Hawthorne

... the representations of Lord Constantine in London and Arthur in Washington. These rebuffs told upon the Minister severely. He knew from whose strong hand they came, and that the same hand would not soon tire ...
— The Art of Disappearing • John Talbot Smith

... do not care for singing psalms; I tire of good men's talk; To me there is no joy in palms, Or white-robed, ...
— The Poetical Works of George MacDonald in Two Volumes, Volume I • George MacDonald

... impressions de troncs de palmires, de tiges de plantes, de roseau, et de quelques fruits etrangers; enfin des ossemens d'animaux terrestres, si rares dans les couches calcaires. Les bois petrifies se trouvent jusques dans les collines de sable de la plaine; l'on en tire, entr'autres, des hauteurs sablonneuses aux environs de Sysran sur la Volga, changes en queux tres-fin, qui a conserve jusqu'a la texture organique du bois, et remarquables sur-tout par les traces tres-evidentes de ...
— Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4) • James Hutton

... I was so miserable that I went out to hunt. I'd scour the country all day and half the night to tire myself out, that I could get some sleep. I was pretty far from home that moonlight night when I heard ...
— The Branding Iron • Katharine Newlin Burt

... the moor," said he, looking round over the undulating downs, long green rollers, with crests of jagged granite foaming up into fantastic surges. "You never tire of the moor. You cannot think the wonderful secrets which it contains. It is so vast, and so barren, and ...
— Hound of the Baskervilles • Authur Conan Doyle

... is not so good as she should be I was angry with her, which I was troubled for I was exceeding free in dallying with her, and she not unfree Ill all this day by reason of the last night's debauch King do tire all his people that are about him with early rising Kissed them myself very often with a great deal of mirth My luck to meet with a sort of drolling workmen on all occasions Show many the strangest emotions to shift off his drink Upon ...
— Widger's Quotations from The Diary of Samuel Pepys • David Widger

... prettier than real logs," said he, and thought he should never tire of turning them on and off and making them sparkle and blaze ...
— Rollo in Society - A Guide for Youth • George S. Chappell

... mind so much leaving her if she were with you,' admitted the Earl, after a long pause. 'But are you sure it will not be too much for you, dear aunt, to have so young a child with you always? Will she not tire you?' ...
— Chatterbox, 1906 • Various

... are but much admired; Men seek for us till they are tired. We tire the horse, but comfort man; Tell me this ...
— The Nursery Rhyme Book • Unknown

... Christopher; if you now feel an inclination to lower your dirty hands, you have my permission to do so. Perhaps it will not tire ...
— The Launch Boys' Adventures in Northern Waters • Edward S. Ellis

... un ecu l'enfant qui fut sacrifie a cette messe qui lui fut presente par une grande fille et ayant tire du sang de l'enfant qu'il piqua a la gorge avec un canif, il en versa dans le calice, apres quoi l'enfant fut retire et emporte dans un autre lieu, dont ensuite on lui rapporta le c[oe]ur et les entrailles pour en faire ...
— The Witch-cult in Western Europe - A Study in Anthropology • Margaret Alice Murray

... Politics, Sir Charles says: "I did not say Gambetta had been a great friend to the Poles. I said he hated the Russians. He told me so over and over again. He held the same view as Napoleon I. as to Russia, and said, 'J'irais chercher mes alliances n'importe oui—meme a Berlin,' and, 'La Russie me tire le pan de l'habit, mais jamais je n'ecouterais ce qu'on me fait dire.' But, in searching for my own reasons for this in the first article, I said that as a law student he had been brought up with a generation ...
— The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke, Vol. 2 • Stephen Gwynn

... so always, as a general rule it is. At Anerley Farm the land was equal to the stock it had to bear, whether of trees, or corn, or cattle, hogs, or mushrooms, or mankind. The farm was not so large or rambling as to tire the mind or foot, yet wide enough and full of change—rich pasture, hazel copse, green valleys, fallows brown, and golden breast-lands pillowing into nooks of fern, clumps of shade for horse or heifer, and for rabbits sandy warren, furzy cleve for hare and partridge, ...
— Mary Anerley • R. D. Blackmore

... less, the geophysicist was saying, but only to the extent that man, newly arrived from Earth, walked with a springier step, didn't tire as quickly. Not enough to cause nausea, even to the inexperienced. The oxygen content of the air, in fact the whole make-up of the air, was so close to Earth quality there were no breathing ...
— Eight Keys to Eden • Mark Irvin Clifton

... for a doctor, for never had the roads been like this. He drove recklessly; where necessary he disregarded fences and pushed across pastures that were hub deep; he even burst through occasional thickets in defiance of axle and tire. It was a mad journey, like the ride in a death-defying movie serial; only by some miraculous power of cohesion did the machine hold together and thus enable him to keep it under way and bring it out to high ground. Since he had not taken time before leaving ...
— Flowing Gold • Rex Beach

... you done to tire you? Slept all yesterday afternoon, and danced perhaps a dozen times at the doctor's last night. You've had more sleep than I've had, begad! You took Miss Renwick home before 'twas over, and mean it was of you, ...
— From the Ranks • Charles King

... made. Now you'd hardly believe the work I've had to show that lot of boneheads that because a guy's a detective in one line, he ain't a detective in every line. Homicide, I said, was Gorry Larrabin's specialty, and where there's no homicide he's no more a detective than a busted rubber tire." ...
— The Dust Flower • Basil King

... detain you longer on the subject of the extent and working of coal, lest I should tire your patience; but before concluding I should wish to give some account of the uses to which this most valuable product is applied. The main use of coal, as we all know, is to produce heat, without which many a paterfamilias would grumble when the ...
— Lectures on Popular and Scientific Subjects • John Sutherland Sinclair, Earl of Caithness

... enterprise, he had been obliged at times to fight many strong men and great combinations of capital; but this same stoicism carried him through: he used to say laughingly that his way was to "tire them out.'' ...
— Volume I • Andrew Dickson White

... had been no Flat Tire, he would have been back in time for the usual round-up of the Irrigation Committee and never would have been ...
— Ade's Fables • George Ade

... feeling of horror swept over him as he thought Meason might have had an object in taking her to the moat. This vanished when he considered he would not know the way in the dark, but how to account for the tire imprints? He followed them; as he neared the moat he listened. Footsteps drawing near, light treading; not a man, perhaps Jane; if so, ...
— The Rider in Khaki - A Novel • Nat Gould

... casually at ease, before the Chief's desk, with the air of a man who does not tire from standing. Now he did something Fancher would not have dared: without the Chief's invitation, Dark sat down in a comfortable chair, leaned back and stretched out his ...
— Rebels of the Red Planet • Charles Louis Fontenay

... with him—that his enjoyments, his active powers, yearly dwindle away—that it is scarcely possible he should not at times feel the hours too long from the difficulty of finding variety of occupation. Writing, walking, even reading very long or talking much with friends and visitors all tire him. He never complains, and I thank God for his patience, and oh! so heartily that he has no pain, no chronic ailment. But alas for the days of his vigour when he was out and in twenty times a day, when life had a zest which ...
— Lady John Russell • Desmond MacCarthy and Agatha Russell

... assist us, and take our sisters under their charge, we thought it better that they should go; for what would become of them, if any accident was to happen to Edward or to me? Now they will be provided for. After they have been taught, they will make very nice tire-women to some lady of quality," added Humphrey, with a sneer. "Don't you think they ...
— The Children of the New Forest • Captain Marryat

... weapon was the great white silence that smothered men's spirits. Sam Bolton clearly saw the North. He felt against him the steady pressure of her resistance. She might yield, but relentlessly regained her elasticity. Men's efforts against her would tire; the mechanics of her power remained constant. What she lost in the moments of her opponent's might, she recovered in the hours of his weakness, so that at the last she won, poised in her original equilibrium above ...
— The Silent Places • Stewart Edward White

... marks of the car minutely. There were two cars at Whiteladies, but neither of the tire markings were those of the car which had turned in ...
— The Master Detective - Being Some Further Investigations of Christopher Quarles • Percy James Brebner

... troubling Philippa just now. Blanche, one of the Countess's tire-women, had just visited her turret-chamber, to inform her that the Lady Alesia was betrothed, and would be married six months thence. It did not, however, trouble her that she had heard of this through a servant; she ...
— The Well in the Desert - An Old Legend of the House of Arundel • Emily Sarah Holt

... than bottomless conceit Can comprehend in still imagination! Drunken Desire must vomit his receipt, Ere he can see his own abomination. While Lust is in his pride, no exclamation Can curb his heat or rein his rash desire, Till like a jade Self-will himself doth tire. ...
— The Rape of Lucrece • William Shakespeare [Clark edition]

... him to Toledo for a conference—so the wire stated—upon an urgent complication newly arisen. Mr. Propbridge, as all the world knew, was one of the heaviest stockholders and a member of the board of the Sonnesbein-Propbridge Tire Company, which, as the world likewise knew, had had tremendous dealings in contracts with the Government and now was having trouble closing up the loose ends of ...
— Sundry Accounts • Irvin S. Cobb

... being something between an essay and a drama; a succession of monologues or table-talks at a typical American boarding-house, with a thread of story running through the whole. The variety of mood and thought is so great that these conversations never tire, and the prose is interspersed with some of the author's choicest verse. The Professor at the Breakfast Table followed too closely on the heels of the Autocrat, and had less freshness. The third number of the series was better, and was pleasantly reminiscent ...
— Initial Studies in American Letters • Henry A. Beers

... dances, it is the custom for the young men to kiss their partners, if they can tire them out; but in some cases, when the girl is strong; and an accomplished dancer, she declines to be tired until she wishes to cease dancing. First one youth danced with Franconnette, then another; but she tired them all. Then came Marcel, the soldier, wearing his sabre, with a cockade in his cap—a ...
— Jasmin: Barber, Poet, Philanthropist • Samuel Smiles

... ever made a deacon out of Jerry Marble I never could imagine! His was the kindest heart that ever bubbled and ran over. He was elastic, tough, incessantly active, and a prodigious worker. He seemed never to tire, but after the longest day's toil, he sprang up the moment he had done with work, as if he were a fine steel spring. A few hours' sleep sufficed him, and he saw the morning stars the year round. His weazened face was leather color, but forever dimpling and changing to keep some sort ...
— Little Masterpieces of American Wit and Humor - Volume I • Various

... is the hub of the solar system. You couldn't pry that out of a Boston man, if you had the tire of all creation straightened ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 6, April, 1858 • Various

... in the morning and exchanged greetings with unusual coldness. Brook asked whether she were tired; she said that she had done nothing to tire her, as though she resented the question; he said nothing in answer, and they both looked at the sea and thought it extremely dull. Presently Johnstone went off for a walk alone, and Clare buried herself in a book for the morning. She did not ...
— Adam Johnstone's Son • F. Marion Crawford

... not have a speaker get the floor before Langdon and have him talk for hours—tire out the old kicker—and await a time when he leaves the Senate chamber to eat or talk to some visitor we could have call on him, then shove the bill through ...
— A Gentleman from Mississippi • Thomas A. Wise

... A rear tire was flat and a young man who was smartly attired in gray was smacking gloved hands together and cursing the lumps of a jail-bird-built road and the guilty negligence of a garage-man who had forgotten to put a lift-jack back into the kit. Two women stood beside ...
— The Landloper - The Romance Of A Man On Foot • Holman Day

... that attaches woman to woman, the girl made her resolves. Her aunt said incessantly: "You must save Edward's life; you must save his life. All that he needs is a little period of satisfaction from you. Then he will tire of you as he has of the others. But you must ...
— The Good Soldier • Ford Madox Ford

... man who loved where he listed and listed quite a lot. As far as he goes he can be visualized perfectly both at Oxford and as a schoolmaster. But he does not go far enough and he belongs to a type of which one can easily tire. Mr. MAIS is not so callow as he once was in his judgement of people mentally distasteful to him, but he still needs a wider outlook on life and a wider knowledge, and I sincerely hope that he will take steps to remove the limitations ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, June 18, 1919 • Various

... it and the town—and then you'll be back where you started. Now, I'm going to hold you to our bargain for your own sake. If you're stuck on the town and the work you can keep right on just as well after you're married; but when you do begin to tire of it, you'll want that fortune to fall back on and do what you like with. Don't let this chance slip—not ...
— The Fortune Hunter • Louis Joseph Vance

... said she. "It will tire you more." Then she gave him some drink. "Try and sleep," she said in ...
— A Tale of a Lonely Parish • F. Marion Crawford

... Mrs. Hamilton began to tire of her position. She felt she was not making Hamilton half unhappy enough. She had had but one idea, and that was to separate him from Saidie, and in this she had failed. He had not even been turned out of his post. He had been expelled from the social ...
— Six Women • Victoria Cross

... to Sally, where he could take night lessons in history, reading, and writing, William became an attentive and consistent attendant. Tommy Watson and Whimple were fearful lest he should undertake too much, finally tire of everything, and lapse into a drifter. Epstein ridiculed their fears and scorned their arguments. "Leave the boy alone," he said, "he knows what he ...
— William Adolphus Turnpike • William Banks

... "Dey get tire' carry Massa Allen long way. No, Caesar t'ink Massa Allen say he walk bit now, and jump down. Dose Massa Allen foots. Got shoe on. Massa ...
— Hunting the Skipper - The Cruise of the "Seafowl" Sloop • George Manville Fenn

... see all sorts of Jewells heere, I will not tire your grace with view of them; Ile onely shew you one faire Aggat more, Commended ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III • Various

... things sometimes when there is a prairie tire," said Jack. "No matter how wide the fire-break may be, a blazing tumbleweed will often roll across it and set tire to the grass beyond. They've been known to leap over streams of considerable width, too, or fall in the water and float across, ...
— The Voyage of the Rattletrap • Hayden Carruth

... tire my Muse, In short, they both were turn'd to yews. Old Goodman Dobson of the green Remembers he the trees has seen; He'll talk of them from noon till night, And goes with folks to show the sight; On Sundays, after evening ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... of the saints and martyrs of the Catholic Church, for of course we are speaking now of times long before the Reformation. The Old Testament stories and all the stories of the life of Christ and His Apostles were well known too, and just as we never tire of reading our favourite books over and over again, our forefathers of 1200 wanted to see on the walls of their churches representations of the stories which they could not read. Their daily thoughts were more occupied with the Infant Christ, the saints, and the angels, than ours ...
— The Book of Art for Young People • Agnes Conway

... to tire our horses any more, boys,' Mr. Hardy said; 'I shall try and stop those rascals ...
— Out on the Pampas - The Young Settlers • G. A. Henty

... cooking. She will turn you out a simple dish of beans that will make you wonder whether the angels have not come down to add some herb from heaven. She will go to market herself every morning, and fight like the devil she is to get things at the lowest prices; she will tire out ...
— Scenes from a Courtesan's Life • Honore de Balzac

... pursued, following on his track with the pertinacity of a bloodhound; over mountain and moor, through forests and dangerous ravines, allowing him no respite, by day or by night. Eating, drinking, sleeping in his saddle, the veteran, eighty years of age, saw his own followers tire one after another, while he urged on the chase, like the wild huntsman of Burger, as if endowed with an unearthly frame, incapable of fatigue! During this terrible pursuit, which continued for more than two hundred leagues over a savage country, Centeno found himself abandoned ...
— The History Of The Conquest Of Peru • William H. Prescott

... a merry River, the River Elusina, that dances at the noise of Musick, [This is confirmed by Ennius and Solon in his holy History.] that with Musick it bubbles, dances, and growes sandy, but returns to a wonted calmness and clearness when the Musick ceases. And lastly, (for I would not tire your patience) Josephus, that learned Jew, tells us of a River in Judea, that runs and moves swiftly all the six dayes of the week, and stands still and rests upon their Sabbath day. But Sir, lest this discourse may seem tedious, I shall ...
— The Compleat Angler - Facsimile of the First Edition • Izaak Walton

... Blue, took turns telling Mr. Brown about their first ride, and then, not wishing to tire them out, or make Toby too tired, either, Mr. Brown sent them home in the pony cart, with ...
— Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue and Their Shetland Pony • Laura Lee Hope

... amusement in such a picture—because, look at the women who come there every morning and bring their knitting! And the "flappers" and the "knuts"—they seem never to tire of seeing each other pass and re-pass for a solid hour on end! Why do they go there? It cannot be to see clothes, because the most you see, as a rule, is a white skirt and blouse and a brown neck all peeling with the heat! ...
— Over the Fireside with Silent Friends • Richard King

... suppose they claim that tire trouble, moths, and malaria increased something terrible," Morris said. "Well, they're going to have just as hard a time proving that claim as Senator Reed would that Brazil is a nation of ...
— Potash and Perlmutter Settle Things • Montague Glass

... inspiration show it. To you is known what we require, Strong drink to sip is our desire; Come, brew me such without delay! Tomorrow sees undone, what happens not today; Still forward press, nor ever tire! The possible, with steadfast trust, Resolve should by the forelock grasp; Then she will never let go her clasp, And labors on, because she must. On German boards, you're well aware, The taste of each may have full sway; Therefore ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... Angel. O who thus hinders thee? On, on! How loiterest thou on glory's path So slowly! O God, sole consolation! Now is there none Who of that victory honour hath That is most holy. 31 Soul, already dost thou tire Sinking so soon beneath thy burden? Nay, soul, take heart! Ah, with what a glowing fire Of desire Cam'st thou couldst thou see what guerdon Were then thy part. 32 Forward, forward let us go: Be of good cheer, O soul made holy By ...
— Four Plays of Gil Vicente • Gil Vicente

... anger, valor, fire, A love that life could never tire, Death quench, or evil stir, The mighty Master ...
— The Life of Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson • Nellie Van de Grift Sanchez

... Minnesota, one is only on the verge of that great wheat region. Far beyond the northern limit of the state it stretches away into latitudes unknown, save to the fur trader and the red man, latitudes which, if you tire not on the road, good reader, you and I may ...
— The Great Lone Land - A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the North-West of America • W. F. Butler

... fix it that he is to get a friend of his to take them over to Chester in time for the train. The fellow don't have to get back himself to-night at all, but he isn't going to let on, you know, so Cam will think they're in the same boat. Then they're going to have a little bit of tire trouble, down in that lonely bit of rough road, that short cut between here and Chester, where there aren't any cars passing to help them out, and they'll miss the train at Chester. See? And then the man will offer to take them ...
— The Search • Grace Livingston Hill

... as full of wind as an auto tire," said Jack. "I've been watching it for some time. It'll be a nasty storm ...
— The Ocean Wireless Boys And The Naval Code • John Henry Goldfrap, AKA Captain Wilbur Lawton

... political emancipation. These were determined to snatch the royal prerogatives from him if he were unworthy of respect and squandered too much public money on his follies. It enraged them to hear that he spent hours on his own toilette, and starched his wife's fine ruffs as if he were her tire-woman. They were angry when they were told that their King regarded his functions so lightly that he gave audiences to ambassadors with a basketful of puppies round his neck, and did not trouble to read the reports his ministers sent to him. They decided secretly to proclaim Henry III's kinsman, ...
— Heroes of Modern Europe • Alice Birkhead

... love affair pleases every one; and I think we shall not tire of love stories till we tire of the mystery of spring, or of primroses and daffodils. Every one I know takes their tale of love to be ...
— The Maid of Maiden Lane • Amelia E. Barr

... produced in later times. Yet we must allow that prejudice and fashion go a great way in determining our likes and dislikes, in furniture as well as in dress and other things. Very likely in a few years we shall tire of the Queen Anne houses and furniture, and hard floors, and have a surfeit of Anglomania, especially if we carry the taste too far. In this country, as Emerson says, "Every rider drives too fast." It is hard to be simple and slow. We must build ...
— The Olden Time Series: Vol. 2: The Days of the Spinning-Wheel in New England • Various

... It was the right hind tire—a hole blown through it ten inches long. The chauffeur kicked it two or three times, lighted a cigarette, and stood looking at the burst tire. Finally he shrugged and glanced across the desert. The wind was blowing hard; there ...
— The Desert Fiddler • William H. Hamby

... essentially defensive. The ideas in lobbing are: (1) to give yourself time to recover position when pulled out of court by your opponent's shot; (2) to drive back the net man and break up his attack; (3) to tire your opponent; (4) occasionally to, win cleanly by placement. This is usually a lob volley from a close net rally, and ...
— The Art of Lawn Tennis • William T. Tilden, 2D

... in looking into his dressing-case, a few days since, to find some lint for his wounds, I discovered this," said tire surgeon, showing the girl a miniature, painted on ivory with great skill and beauty. "I think it must be a likeness of the Senorita Isabella," continued the surgeon, "though I have never seen her ...
— The Heart's Secret - The Fortunes of a Soldier, A Story of Love and the Low Latitudes • Maturin Murray

... slightest encouragement to break out into the friendliest and most intimate of smiles. Wherever we went we were accompanied by a retinue straight out of the Arabian Nights, patiently awaiting the moment when we should tire; should seek out the table of a sidewalk cafe; and should, in our relaxed mood, be ready to unbend to our ...
— African Camp Fires • Stewart Edward White

... then how flushed and excited she looked, how quickly she seemed to tire of the dance and went out on the veranda for cooler air, and presently they were missed and were gone from the room the rest of the evening, so that the hop broke up early, and the anxious women hurrying homeward ...
— Under Fire • Charles King

... been extraordinary, for none seemed to tire of hearing him, and many sought him in his haunts, eager to hear his engaging and instructive talk. Many, indeed, in his later years, came from other cities of Greece, drawn to Athens by his fame, and ...
— Historic Tales, vol 10 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... he is in love with another woman, he will soon tire of his present surroundings and ...
— 10,000 Dreams Interpreted • Gustavus Hindman Miller

... on, and if he hadn't we would have seen what would come of it. And damn it, if he does not sanction the decree against the priests, and do it right off; we will come back every day. In this way we shall tire him out and make him afraid of us.—But the day wears on. The heat is over-powering, the fatigue extreme, the King less deserted and better protected. Five or six of the deputies, three of the municipal officers, a few officers of the National Guard, have succeeded in making their way to him. ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 3 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 2 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... our soldiers never tire, In streets, in lane, in hall, The red-hot Gospel's shot to fire And crown Him ...
— Recollections of a Long Life - An Autobiography • Theodore Ledyard Cuyler

... famed throughout Flanders as the birthplace of the "Four sons of Aymon," and the exploits of the great horse Bayard. The legend of the Four Sons of Aymon is endeared to the people, and they never tire of relating the story in song as well as prose. Indeed this legend is perhaps the best preserved of all throughout Flanders. It dates from the time of Charlemagne, the chief of the great leaders of Western ...
— Vanished towers and chimes of Flanders • George Wharton Edwards

... why, since by this Sorcery the Devil perform'd such Wonders, that is, play'd so many Tricks in the World, and had such universal Success, he should set up no more of them; but there might be a great many Reasons given for that, too long to tire you with at present: 'Tis true, there were not many of them, and yet considering what a great deal of Business they dispatch'd, it was enough, for six or eight Oracles were more than sufficient to amuse all the World: The chief Oracles we meet with in History are among ...
— The History of the Devil - As Well Ancient as Modern: In Two Parts • Daniel Defoe

... obtained elsewhere. Books that charm the hearts of the little ones and of which they never tire. ...
— Six Little Bunkers at Mammy June's • Laura Lee Hope

... glad to hear," said Baird, "but you must not tire yourself by standing," and he took her hand gently and led her to a chair and sat down beside her, still ...
— In Connection with the De Willoughby Claim • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... carpenter's door. They were tired out, and pale with hunger, as they had eaten nothing since they left home, and Madame Rivet ran out, and made them alight, one after another, and kissed them as soon as they were on the ground, and she seemed as if she would never tire of kissing her sister-in-law, whom she apparently wanted to monopolize. They had lunch in the workshop, which had been cleared out for the ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume II (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... subsided; and favoured by the obscurity of my situation, I could watch at a distance all her movements, and never tire of gazing upon that ...
— The Monctons: A Novel, Volume I • Susanna Moodie

... most unpleasant way in the world, attending poor Mrs. Leneve's death-bed, a spectator of all the horrors of tedious suffering and clear sense, and with no one soul to speak to—but I will not tire you with a description of what has quite ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole - Volume I • Horace Walpole

... with joy at the sight of her husband once more, for she had believed him dead, and she was very thin from not eating while he was away. Never did she tire of listening to his stories of his life among the stars, and so happy was she to have him again that when the time came for him to leave she ...
— Philippine Folk Tales • Mabel Cook Cole

... to rest a little, Mrs. Jervis," said Marcella, with gentle authority. "You know the dressing must tire you, though you won't confess it. Let me put you comfortable. There; aren't the pillows ...
— Marcella • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... an eye on the clock. I was hopeful now, and was looking for the right kind of chance. The risk was that I might tire sooner than him and be at ...
— Greenmantle • John Buchan

... as she's had some tea," said Vera, ringing, "you must go in, Felicity. We mustn't tire ...
— The Twelfth Hour • Ada Leverson

... in the air and hurrying by the dripping hedgerows, "you are not to be coaxed by me! I have jilted you shamefully, I own it; you are a female, and unforgiving. I don't complain. You may be very pretty, but you are the stupidest and most tire some companion that ever I met with. Thank Heaven, I am not ...
— My Novel, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... my back is turned one or other is sure to push through the roof, and get out among the flower-beds. Will you never change your mind, and live with me, Annemie? I am sure you would be happy, and the starling says your name quite plain, and he is such a funny bird to talk to; you never would tire of him. Will you never come? It is so bright there, and green and sweet smelling; and to think you never even have seen it!—and the swans and all,—it ...
— Bebee • Ouida

... people," said Ed cheerfully. "It all gives you an idea. I only hope you didn't tire yourself out. You'll soon be all right, of course, but you have to be careful yet. We'll have a ...
— Widdershins • Oliver Onions

... day passed without my being honoured by a visit from Captain Nemo. The panels of the saloon did not open. Perhaps they did not wish us to tire of these ...
— Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea • Jules Verne

... rare as wonderful; besides that the expedient rid her at once of most of her gentle suitors, who would have as soon wielded a conjuring wand as a composing stick. Some of the more ordinary typographers made the attempt: but none were sufficiently possessed of the mysteryBut I tire you." ...
— The Antiquary, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... others distract, engage, soothe, whom solitude harasses, pains, stupefies, like the forward movement of a terrible glacier, or the traversing of the desert; and those, on the contrary, whom others weary, tire, bore, silently torture, while isolation calms them, bathes them in the repose of independency, and plunges them into the humors of their own thoughts. In fine, there is here a normal, physical phenomenon. Some are constituted to live ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume IV (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... evidently nothing; only the constable ordered a whole barrel of ale to treat his posse and any one about tire town who chose to drink, and the barrel was rolled out on the grass, tapped, and for a half hour there was a great jollification, which was not exactly in honor of our wedding, but which afforded the greatest gratification to the constable, his retainers, ...
— Seven Wives and Seven Prisons • L.A. Abbott

... was the young tutor had begun to tire woefully of the daily grind he had taken up so blithely. It was the incorrigible Carnegy boys who were his special worry. His other pupils, a meek, small boy and his shy sister, though they would never set the Thames on fire by their wit, at the same time would never goad their ...
— The Captain's Bunk - A Story for Boys • M. B. Manwell

... to whom thy vows are paid In temple and in holy shade, With all the mighty saints combine To keep that precious life of thine. The arms wise Visvamitra(292) gave Thy virtuous soul from danger save. Long be thy life: thy sure defence Shall be thy truthful innocence, And that obedience, naught can tire, To me thy mother and thy sire. May fanes where holy fires are fed, Altars with grass and fuel spread, Each sacrificial ground, each tree, Rock, lake, and mountain, prosper thee. Let old Viraj,(293) and Him who made The universe, combine to aid; Let Indra and each guardian ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... only does this produce corns, bunions, and lame feet, but it makes both standing and walking painful and feeble, and destroys the balance of the entire body, causing the back to ache, the shoulders to droop forward, and the neck muscles to tire themselves out trying to pull the head back so as to keep the face and eyes erect. Thus one soon tires, and never really enjoys walking. If this disturbance of balance is increased by high heels, thrust forward under the middle of the foot, ...
— A Handbook of Health • Woods Hutchinson

... undaunted, thoughtless of despair, The Will that builded thee shall build again, And all thy broken promise spring more fair. Thou mighty mother of as mighty men. Thou wilt arise invincible, supreme! The earth to voice thy glory never tire, And song, unborn, shall chant no nobler theme, Proud city of my love and my desire. But I—shall see thee ever as of old! Thy wraith of pearl, wall, minaret and spire, Framed in the mists that veil thy Gate of Gold, Lost city of ...
— The California Birthday Book • Various

... matches, ditch-digging, regattas, and piling cord wood. At times, they became commercial and entered into partnership, having with their old mystery a "certain" capital. Above all they revel in motion. When they tire of walking-matches—A rides on horseback, or borrows a bicycle and competes with his weaker-minded associates on foot. Now they race on locomotives; now they row; or again they become historical and engage stage-coaches; or at times they are aquatic and swim. If their occupation is actual ...
— Literary Lapses • Stephen Leacock

... rampage, and while we were seeking out a crossing our employer had time for a few comments. "The Don's tickled with his prospects. He thinks he's got a half inch rope on Juana right now; but if I thought your prospects were no better than I know his are, you wouldn't tire any horse-flesh of mine by riding to the Frio and the San Miguel. But go right on, and stay as long as you want to, for I'm in no hurry to see your faces again. Tom, with the ice broken as it is, as soon as Esther can remove her disabilities—well, you won't have to ...
— A Texas Matchmaker • Andy Adams

... rather lose the crown than gain it so—a protest which James must have thought a piece of affectation, for he replied with a jeer that his companion was too solicitous for the welfare of a country which would neither acknowledge him as prince nor receive him as citizen. Perkin must have begun to tire the patience of the finest gentleman in Christendom before James would have made such a contemptuous retort. He returned with the King, however, when this unsuccessful expedition—the only use of which was that it proved to James the fruitlessness of fighting ...
— Royal Edinburgh - Her Saints, Kings, Prophets and Poets • Margaret Oliphant

... the work did not tire me as much as the mere mechanical grind of the hammer-and-tongs work on The Press had done. Each day was so filled with new problems and new interests, so crammed with activity, that we were carried along ...
— Land of the Burnt Thigh • Edith Eudora Kohl

... gravely into the encampment" "'You have done well to get back alive'" "Sergeant Corney waved the bit of fringe slowly to and fro" "'Tire 'em out, lads!' the General shouted" "Three or four hundred Indians were dancing wildly around a huge fire" "With upraised hands, stepped out from amid the screen of foliage" "The painted villain sank down upon the ground" "Keep a-movin' unless you're ...
— The Minute Boys of the Mohawk Valley • James Otis

... which they love better than they love themselves. Without this common end, friendship might wear itself out, or expend itself in things unworthy of an exalted purpose. Neither brilliant conversation, nor mutual courtesies, nor active sympathies will make social intercourse a perpetual charm. We tire of everything, at times, except the felicities of a pure and fervid love. But even husband and wife might tire without the common guardianship of children, or kindred zeal in some practical aims which both alike seek to secure; for they ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume IV • John Lord

... she may sorely need a woman's aid, and what woman should it be save her own sister? I can take my tire-woman with us." ...
— Sir Nigel • Arthur Conan Doyle

... looked round for Tom, who should have been there to mend a tire. He saw nothing at first: only a few electric lamps studding the darkness; a faint glimmer lighting up a number of properties; farther on, the dull gleam of stacked-up bikes; and, lastly, Tom, with his cap cocked back and trousers turned ...
— The Bill-Toppers • Andre Castaigne

... still utilizes the Manchegan or Estremaduran bull as a means of conferring "happy despatch" on her superannuated horses and absorbing the surplus belligerence of her "roughs." She seems, however, disposed to tire of this feast of equine and taurine blood, and the last relic of the arena will before many years follow its cognate brutalities. For obvious reasons, bull-fighting can be the sport, habitually, of but an infinitesimal fraction of the ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 17, - No. 97, January, 1876 • Various

... turn into salt pork, bacon, and ham. We have occasionally sent a cask or two of pork, some flitches or hams, to market; but as a rule we consume our pigs on the farm. Pig-meat is most reliable as a staple. One does not tire of it so utterly as one does of either mutton or beef, if one of these be the ...
— Brighter Britain! (Volume 1 of 2) - or Settler and Maori in Northern New Zealand • William Delisle Hay

... surely his creatures to betray Bough Van Busch. "Let the dogs smell around the place," he thought, when by the sounds that reached him in his hiding-place he knew the Advance had halted. "They'll tire of the game ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... announced loudly. "Master Tom, you'll have to pick up your toys now; and look at the litter you've made the table in! Miss Faith, shall I hold baby while you have your tea? I'll rompsy with her a bit, and that'll tire her ...
— Anxious Audrey • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... before the machine reached Sarengrad, a blowout which made another tire a necessity. The second, a broken leaf of a spring, which made rapid travel hazardous. But it was not until nightfall, in the midst of a desolation of plains, that carburetor trouble of a most disturbing character ...
— The Secret Witness • George Gibbs

... a steam kettle and her own stock of mucilage), was Mrs. Pennycook's dearest friend and her authority for the knowledge that while all men will bear watching, married men will bear a most minute scrutiny. Mrs. Pennycook knew that as a wife she was approaching the unlovely age when fickle husbands tire and cast about for younger and prettier women. Hence she decided to trim her mental lamps and light the dastard Daniel out ...
— The Long Chance • Peter B. Kyne

... chamber Rodolf sought in vain to allay the feverish excitement he had endured. He seemed left to the sport and caprice of a power he could not control. The coursers of the imagination grew wilder with restraint: he recklessly flung the reins upon their neck; but this did not tire their impetuosity. His brain glowed like a furnace; he seemed hastening fast on to the verge of either folly or madness. He threw himself on the couch, when the voice of Altdorff came like a winged harmony upon his spirit. The page was seated in the narrow cloisters,—the ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... I sip As it leaves Anacreon's lip; Void of care, and free from dread, From his fingers snatch his bread, Then with luscious plenty gay, Round his chamber dance and play; Or from wine, as courage springs, O'er his face extend my wings; And when feast and frolic tire, Drop asleep upon his lyre. This is all, be quick and go, More than all thou canst not know; Let me now my pinions ply, I ...
— Anecdotes of the late Samuel Johnson, LL.D. - during the last twenty years of his life • Hester Lynch Piozzi

... from his short trip he gave two or three more lectures, with a somewhat diminishing attendance. Dr. Stebbins remarked in explanation, "I thought the people would tire in the sockets of their wings if they ...
— A Backward Glance at Eighty • Charles A. Murdock

... listed on the New York Stock Exchange may be divided into classes, such as railroad stocks, public utility stocks, motor stocks, tire stocks, oil stocks, copper stocks, gold stocks, and so forth. At certain times certain stocks are in a much more favorable condition than at other times. In 1919, when the industrial stocks were selling ...
— Successful Stock Speculation • John James Butler

... tact which enables a man to measure his own estimation with others, was not slow to perceive that the more enlightened part of his audience began to tire of this pretending buffoonery. Resorting to a happy subterfuge, by means of one of his sleight-of-hand expedients, he succeeded in transferring the whole of that portion of the spectators who still found amusement ...
— The Headsman - The Abbaye des Vignerons • James Fenimore Cooper

... I care for 'em?" said Sally, with a toss of her head. "Why they follow me, I don't see. I don't do anything to make 'em, and I tell 'em all that they tire me to death; and still they will hang round. What is the reason, do ...
— The Pearl of Orr's Island - A Story of the Coast of Maine • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... and putting his arm lightly round Pantaleone's waist, he reminded him of the French proverb: 'Le vin est tire—il faut ...
— The Torrents of Spring • Ivan Turgenev

... conclusion; a curve must bend at every point, and yet not bend at any point; it must be nowhere a straight line, and yet be a straight line at every part. The blacksmith, passing an iron bar between three rollers to make a tire for a wheel, bends every part of it infinitely little, so that the bending shall not be perceptible at any one spot, and shall yet in the whole length arch the tire to a full circle. It may be that in this paradox lies an additional charm of the curved outline. ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 30, April, 1860 • Various

... have both the physician, and the surgeon's advice."—Cooper's Pl. and Pr. Gram., p. 140. "This out-side fashionableness of the Taylor on Tire-woman's making."—Locke, on Education, p. 49. "Some pretending to be of Paul's party, others of Apollos, others of Cephas, and others, pretending yet higher, to be of Christ's."—Woods Dict., w. Apollos. "Nor is ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... trackless waste of moss which, bending to the pressure of broad tire or padded foot, rose up again behind us, leaving no sign that we had passed. We might indeed have been the wraiths of the departed dead upon the dead sea of that dying planet for all the sound or sign we made in passing. It was the first march of a large body of men and animals I had ever ...
— A Princess of Mars • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... through Quaking-Asp Grove and White Lodge and the Indian agency at night. I had a breakdown after going past Talpers's store—a tire to replace. By the time I climbed the hill on the Dollar Sign road it was well along in the morning. I saw a man coming toward me on a white horse. It was my brother, Willard Sargent, or Willis Morgan. He looked much like me. The ...
— Mystery Ranch • Arthur Chapman

... de Bernstein, after a week or two, began to tire of Castlewood and the inhabitants of that mansion, and the neighbours who came to visit them. This clever woman tired of most things and people sooner or later. So she took to nodding and sleeping over the ...
— The Virginians • William Makepeace Thackeray

... and perhaps a possible tire or so does not give one the sense of ownership that having the motor car gives; nor was it Steve's notion of being the possessor of a home. He spoke to Beatrice about it, only to be kissed affectionately and scolded prettily by way of answer; or else to ...
— The Gorgeous Girl • Nalbro Bartley

... for them, in the way they take, so to express Passion as that the effects of it should appear in the concernment of an audience; their speeches being so many declamations, which tire us with the length: so that, instead of persuading us to grieve for their imaginary heroes, we are concerned for our own trouble, as we are, in the tedious visits of bad [dull] company; we are in ...
— An English Garner - Critical Essays & Literary Fragments • Edited by Professor Arber and Thomas Seccombe

... and crimson crest to charming advantage. The notes of the cuckoo blend with this cheering concert in a pleasing manner, and for a short time are highly grateful to the ear. But sweet as this singular song is, it would tire by its uniformity, were it not given in so ...
— The Illustrated London Reading Book • Various

... that they are my verses that attract all these kindnesses. Corneille composes verses a hundred times finer than mine, but no one regards him. His verses are only applauded from the mouths of the actors. I do not tire men of the world by reciting my works; I never allude to them; I endeavour to amuse them with matters which please them. My talent in their company is, not to make them feel that I have any genius, but to show them that they possess some themselves. When you observe ...
— Literary Character of Men of Genius - Drawn from Their Own Feelings and Confessions • Isaac D'Israeli

... and then decided that he had better take a walk; to sit still and brood was the worst possible way of facing such a crisis. There was no friend with whom he could discuss the situation; none whose companionship would just now do him any particular good. Better to walk twenty miles, and tire himself out, and see how things looked after a good night's sleep, So he put on his soft hat, and took his walking-stick, and slammed the door behind him. Some one was coming up the stairs; sunk in his own thoughts he paid no heed, ...
— Will Warburton • George Gissing

... a change by-and-by, you set me thinking. Perhaps you are already beginning to tire of ...
— The Golden Calf • M. E. Braddon

... Isabella was dead, and Joseph had fallen insensible upon the body. [Footnote: This extraordinary account of the life and death of the infanta, Isabella of Parma, is no romance; it rests upon facts which are mentioned by historians of the reign of Maria Theresa. Caroline Pichler, whose mother was tire-woman to the empress when the archduchess died, relates the history of the prophecy, wherein Isabella, first in three hours, then in as many days, weeks, months, and years, awaited her death. She also relates the fact of ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... kakapeya, and I think it most likely that it means rising to a level with the tirthas, the fords or bathing-places. Mr. Rhys Davids informs me that the commentary explains the two words by samatittika ti samaharita, kakapeyya ti yatthatatthaki tire thitena ...
— Chips From A German Workshop, Vol. V. • F. Max Mueller

... who still your lonely burthen bear, Spilling your blood beneath life's bitter thrall, A little while and we shall all meet there, And one kind Mother's bosom screen us all; Oppression's harness will no longer tire Or gall us there, nor Sorrow's whip ...
— Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, March 1844 - Volume 23, Number 3 • Various

... winter long I rode the snows, rejoicing on my way; At midnight our revival hymns rolled o'er the sobbing bay; Three Sabbath sermons, every week, should tire a man of brass— And still our fervent membership must have their ...
— Tales of the Chesapeake • George Alfred Townsend

... who were always free from prejudices and blunders. They were not men, as a rule, from university quadrangles nor college cloisters. They were not the wise, nor the erudite, nor the cultivated, nor the rich. They were the good men. Brilliant men tire us; wits soon bore us with their gilt-edged nothings, but men with clean, holy hearts, fixed convictions, bold antipathies to sin, sympathetic natures and tender consciences never weary us, and they bear the intimate and familiar acquaintance ...
— The Heart-Cry of Jesus • Byron J. Rees

... I cried, "which I am always sure to meet in the newspapers whenever I meet with your name; and I begin to quite tire of seeing it for ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madam D'Arblay Volume 2 • Madame D'Arblay

... the best tire-woman they could get to make up their head-dresses and adjust their double pinners, and they had their red brushes and patches from ...
— The Blue Fairy Book • Various

... relation that exists between the health of the body and the health of the spirit. A strong will, showing itself in ability to concentrate its efforts on a chosen purpose, is not to be expected in a child whose muscles are flabby and whose nerves quickly tire. Since the will expresses itself in action, it can be best cultivated in a body ...
— Your Child: Today and Tomorrow • Sidonie Matzner Gruenberg

... learn to rule myself, To be the child I should, Honest and brave, and never tire Of trying to be good? How can I keep a sunny soul To shine along life's way? How can I tune my little heart ...
— Lives of Girls Who Became Famous • Sarah Knowles Bolton

... old dodge, and there's money in it, too—money that will never be got out of it. But I really have a grand scheme. So many of our dailies, you know, go in for every horrid detail of daily events that people are beginning to tire of them. They contain practically the same things day after day. So many columns of murder, so many beautiful suicides, so much sport, a modicum of general intelligence, plenty of fires, no end of embezzlements, financial news, advertisements, and head-lines. Events, ...
— The Idiot • John Kendrick Bangs

... simple exercise of commonsense. Feed them little and often, about five times a day, and encourage them to move about as much as possible; and see that they never go hungry, without allowing them to gorge. Let them play until they tire, and sleep until they hunger again, and they will be found to thrive and grow with surprising rapidity. At six weeks old they can fend for themselves, and shortly afterwards additions may be made to their diet in the shape of paunches, carefully cleaned ...
— Dogs and All About Them • Robert Leighton

... too far to walk? I fancy I know where Marylebone is—north of Oxford Street. Will it tire you ...
— Fan • Henry Harford

... at the sign of tire Green Serpent, and before he set out for Willimoteswick, he confided to Master Groot a bag containing a silver cup or two, and a variety of coins, mostly French. They were, he said, spoils of his wars ...
— Grisly Grisell • Charlotte M. Yonge

... the party had to rest, until Lewis and one of the Afghans pushed on to the head of the Oakover, which they thought could not be so very far distant, as the nights were cool and dewy, and in the camp of the natives they found two large seashells, an old iron tomahawk, and part of the tire of ...
— The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888 • Ernest Favenc

... was the indignant reply, as the driver knelt in the dust and began examining the tire carefully. "But you can't fix a puncture in ...
— The Border Boys Across the Frontier • Fremont B. Deering

... tharfore. But bein' afoot won't hinder 'em from keepin' up with my caravan, for in the mountains the snow is to the waggon beds an' the best we can do, is wriggle along the trail like a hurt snake at a gait which wouldn't tire a papoose. ...
— Wolfville Nights • Alfred Lewis

... proverb must be rendered literally, even if it doesn't make very good sense; if it doesn't make sense at all, it must be explained in a note. For example, there is a proverb in German: "Quand le cheval est selle il faut le monter;" in French there is a proverb: "Quand le vin est tire il faut le boire." Well, a translator who would translate quand le cheval, etc., by quand le vin, etc., is an ass, and does not know his business. In translation, only a strictly classical language should be used; no word of slang, or even word of modern ...
— Confessions of a Young Man • George Moore

... "You tire me. Do you think I don't know my work? I'm here to do the chores—and well I know it. You're here to do a man's work, same as any other man. You get out and find the gold, I can look after the house—if you can call it a house," ...
— The Twins of Suffering Creek • Ridgwell Cullum

... the time I thought maybe it was a tire in the street blowin' out. But come to think of it later we ...
— Tangled Trails - A Western Detective Story • William MacLeod Raine

... tire of me. I have no beauty, no accomplishments, no fortune,—nothing but my heart, and my hand to give the man I marry. Is that enough?" asked Christie, looking at him with eyes that betrayed the hunger of an empty heart longing to be ...
— Work: A Story of Experience • Louisa May Alcott

... dentist, using but one hand, twisted a cane out of Heise's two with a wrench that all but sprained the harnessmaker's arm. Then the dentist raised weights and chinned himself on the rings till they thought he would never tire. ...
— McTeague • Frank Norris



Words linked to "Tire" :   consume, poop out, indispose, pneumatic tyre, overfatigue, withdraw, radial tire, overweary, peter out, wipe out, deteriorate, tucker out, beat, interest, use up, refresh, hoop, wash up, devolve, tucker, degenerate, conk out, flat tire, wear down, run through, deplete, ring, run out, eat, drop, eat up



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