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Thrasher   /θrˈæʃər/   Listen
Thrasher

noun
1.
A farm machine for separating seeds or grain from the husks and straw.  Synonyms: thresher, threshing machine.
2.
Thrush-like American songbird able to mimic other birdsongs.  Synonym: mocking thrush.
3.
Large pelagic shark of warm seas with a whiplike tail used to round up small fish on which to feed.  Synonyms: Alopius vulpinus, fox shark, thresher, thresher shark.



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"Thrasher" Quotes from Famous Books



... surrounded the place of his birth. Though a mere boy, the natural objects, eternally unchangeable, which daily met his eyes—the profound silence of the scene, broken only by the bleating of a solitary sheep, or the crowing of a distant cock, or the thrasher beating out with his flail the scanty grain of the black oats spread upon a skin in the open air, or the streamlets leaping from the rocky clefts, or the distant church-bell sounding up the valley on Sundays—all bred in his mind a profound melancholy and feeling ...
— Industrial Biography - Iron Workers and Tool Makers • Samuel Smiles

... it's as well that we did not catch a much bigger fellow, for we should have had some difficulty in handling it. I have known these fellows attack a whale, and run their beaks right into its side, while the thrasher sticks to its back; and between them they manage to kill the monster, though I believe the sharks benefit most by the hunt. I have seen them caught in the Mediterranean by harpoons, especially off the coast of Sicily. The people in ...
— The South Sea Whaler • W.H.G. Kingston

... and western oceans. The square, compact, steam-compressed bundles are carried by elevators well up toward the top of the building, where they await the knife of the "opener." When they have been opened, the "feeder" throws the contents by armfuls into the "thrasher." The novice or layman, ignorant of the state in which rags come to the mill, will find their condition a most unpleasant surprise, especially disagreeable to his olfactory nerves. Yet the unsavory revelation comes with more force a little farther on, in the "assorting-room." ...
— A Book of Exposition • Homer Heath Nugent

... excellence be that wondrous brilliancy and variety of execution suggested by the Mocking-Bird, then the palm belongs, among our New-England songsters, to the Red Thrush, otherwise called the Mavis or Brown Thrasher. I have never heard the Mocking-Bird sing at liberty; and while the caged bird may surpass the Red Thrush in volume of voice and in quaintness of direct imitation, he gives me no such impression of depth and magnificence. I know not ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, Number 59, September, 1862 • Various

... passing one arm around his neck and leaning forward over the flag. The sun was dipping between a cleft in the hills, flinging out long rosy beams across the misty valley. The mocking birds had ceased, but a thrasher was singing in a tangle of Cherokee roses ...
— Special Messenger • Robert W. Chambers

... He is quite as suspicious as the brown thrush, and his instinct for an invisible perch is perhaps as unerring as the cuckoo's; and yet, even when he takes to hiding, his manner is not without a dash of boldness. He has a most irascible temper, also, but, unlike the thrasher, he does not allow his ill-humor to degenerate into chronic sulkiness. Instead, he flies into a furious passion, and is done with it. Some say that on such occasions he swears, and I have myself seen him when it was plain that nothing except a natural impossibility kept him ...
— Birds in the Bush • Bradford Torrey

... kind of gurgling quality, as if the bird were pressing his notes through an aqueous lyre, if such a conception is possible. Besides, I have, on more than one occasion, heard a jay warble a soft, reserved little lay that was continued for many minutes. It sounded very like the song of the brown thrasher, much modulated and partly uttered under its breath—a sort ...
— Our Bird Comrades • Leander S. (Leander Sylvester) Keyser

... a brown-thrasher's nest; it is not a nest you are likely to stumble upon in your walk; it is hidden as a miser hides his gold, and watched as jealously. The male pours out his rich and triumphant song from the tallest tree he can find, ...
— Birds and Bees, Sharp Eyes and, Other Papers • John Burroughs

... finest singers in the whole neighborhood was Buddy Brown-Thrasher. Though he belonged to the Pleasant Valley Singing Society, he sang so well that he usually preferred to sing by himself, instead of attending a singing party. Each morning and each evening he would seat himself ...
— The Tale of Jasper Jay - Tuck-Me-In Tales • Arthur Scott Bailey

... in to the African coast, we saw a splendid tight in the sea, between a big black whale on the one side, and a 'thrasher' or fox-shark on the other, aided by a swordfish, with which latter he had just apparently struck up an alliance offensive and ...
— Young Tom Bowling - The Boys of the British Navy • J.C. Hutcheson

... mischievous boys, Run de'ils for rantin' an' for noise; A gaudsman ane, a thrasher t'other. Wee Davock hauds the nowt in fother. I rule them as I ought, discreetly, An' aften labour them completely; An' ay on Sundays, duly, nightly, I on the Questions targe them tightly; Till, faith, wee Davock's turn'd sae gleg, Tho' scarcely langer than your leg, He'll screed you aff ...
— The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. • Robert Burns and Allan Cunningham

... wielded his with his usual savageness and activity. It whirled round his adversary's head with frightful rapidity. Now it carried away a feather of his plume; now it shore off a leaf of his coronet. The flail of the thrasher does not fall more swiftly upon the corn. For many minutes it was the Unknown's only task to defend himself from the ...
— Burlesques • William Makepeace Thackeray

... thrashers were both practically aiming at the same place, it was necessary, in order to prevent their flails colliding, that one lash should be up in the air at the same moment that the other was down on the floor, so that it required some practice in order to become a proficient thrasher. The flails descended on the barn floors with the regularity of the ticking of a clock, or the rhythmic and measured footsteps of a man walking in a pair of clogs at a quickstep speed over the hard surface of a cobbled ...
— From John O'Groats to Land's End • Robert Naylor and John Naylor



Words linked to "Thrasher" :   brown thrush, genus Toxostoma, Alopius, farm machine, oscine bird, Toxostoma, oscine, shark, thrash, genus Alopius, Toxostoma rufums



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