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Take   /teɪk/   Listen
Take

verb
(past took; past part. taken; pres. part. taking)
1.
Carry out.  "Take steps" , "Take vengeance"
2.
Require (time or space).  Synonyms: occupy, use up.  "This event occupied a very short time"
3.
Take somebody somewhere.  Synonyms: conduct, direct, guide, lead.  "Can you take me to the main entrance?" , "He conducted us to the palace"
4.
Get into one's hands, take physically.  Synonym: get hold of.  "Can you take this bag, please"
5.
Take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect.  Synonyms: acquire, adopt, assume, take on.  "The story took a new turn" , "He adopted an air of superiority" , "She assumed strange manners" , "The gods assume human or animal form in these fables"
6.
Interpret something in a certain way; convey a particular meaning or impression.  Synonym: read.  "How should I take this message?" , "You can't take credit for this!"
7.
Take something or somebody with oneself somewhere.  Synonyms: bring, convey.  "Take these letters to the boss" , "This brings me to the main point"
8.
Take into one's possession.  "I'll take three salmon steaks"
9.
Travel or go by means of a certain kind of transportation, or a certain route.  "She takes Route 1 to Newark"
10.
Pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives.  Synonyms: choose, pick out, select.  "Choose a good husband for your daughter" , "She selected a pair of shoes from among the dozen the salesgirl had shown her"
11.
Receive willingly something given or offered.  Synonyms: accept, have.  "I won't have this dog in my house!" , "Please accept my present"
12.
Assume, as of positions or roles.  Synonyms: fill, occupy.  "He occupies the position of manager" , "The young prince will soon occupy the throne"
13.
Take into consideration for exemplifying purposes.  Synonyms: consider, deal, look at.  "Consider the following case"
14.
Require as useful, just, or proper.  Synonyms: ask, call for, demand, involve, necessitate, need, postulate, require.  "Success usually requires hard work" , "This job asks a lot of patience and skill" , "This position demands a lot of personal sacrifice" , "This dinner calls for a spectacular dessert" , "This intervention does not postulate a patient's consent"
15.
Experience or feel or submit to.  "Take the plunge"
16.
Make a film or photograph of something.  Synonyms: film, shoot.  "Shoot a movie"
17.
Remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract.  Synonyms: remove, take away, withdraw.  "Remove a wrapper" , "Remove the dirty dishes from the table" , "Take the gun from your pocket" , "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
18.
Serve oneself to, or consume regularly.  Synonyms: consume, have, ingest, take in.  "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
19.
Accept or undergo, often unwillingly.  Synonym: submit.
20.
Make use of or accept for some purpose.  Synonym: accept.  "Take an opportunity"
21.
Take by force.  "The army took the fort on the hill"
22.
Occupy or take on.  Synonyms: assume, strike, take up.  "She took her seat on the stage" , "We took our seats in the orchestra" , "She took up her position behind the tree" , "Strike a pose"
23.
Admit into a group or community.  Synonyms: accept, admit, take on.  "We'll have to vote on whether or not to admit a new member"
24.
Ascertain or determine by measuring, computing or take a reading from a dial.  "A reading was taken of the earth's tremors"
25.
Be a student of a certain subject.  Synonyms: learn, read, study.
26.
Take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs.  Synonyms: claim, exact.  "The hard work took its toll on her"
27.
Head into a specified direction.  Synonym: make.  "We made for the mountains"
28.
Point or cause to go (blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment) towards.  Synonyms: aim, direct, take aim, train.  "He trained his gun on the burglar" , "Don't train your camera on the women" , "Take a swipe at one's opponent"
29.
Be seized or affected in a specified way.  "Be taken drunk"
30.
Have with oneself; have on one's person.  Synonyms: carry, pack.  "I always carry money" , "She packs a gun when she goes into the mountains"
31.
Engage for service under a term of contract.  Synonyms: charter, engage, hire, lease, rent.  "Let's rent a car" , "Shall we take a guide in Rome?"
32.
Receive or obtain regularly.  Synonyms: subscribe, subscribe to.
33.
Buy, select.
34.
To get into a position of having, e.g., safety, comfort.
35.
Have sex with; archaic use.  Synonym: have.
36.
Lay claim to; as of an idea.  Synonym: claim.
37.
Be designed to hold or take.  Synonym: accept.
38.
Be capable of holding or containing.  Synonyms: contain, hold.  "The flask holds one gallon"
39.
Develop a habit.
40.
Proceed along in a vehicle.  Synonym: drive.
41.
Obtain by winning.  "He took first prize"
42.
Be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness.  Synonyms: contract, get.  "She came down with pneumonia" , "She took a chill"



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"Take" Quotes from Famous Books



... was the complete success of the clean government ticket, and the triumphant return of Grover Cleveland, the first Democrat to take the oath since the Civil War, and perhaps the strongest and best ...
— A History of the United States • Cecil Chesterton

... more due unto it; what was unreasonably committed to the ground, is reasonably resumed from it; let monuments and rich fabricks, not riches, adorn men's ashes. The commerce of the living is not to be transferred unto the dead; it is not injustice to take that which none com- plains to lose, and no man is wronged where no man ...
— Religio Medici, Hydriotaphia, and the Letter to a Friend • Sir Thomas Browne

... o' truth shall read, Ilk man and mother's son, take heed; Whene'er to drink you are inclin'd, Or cutty-sarks run in your mind, Think, ye may buy the joys o'er dear, Remember Tam ...
— Tam O'Shanter • Robert Burns

... to extend the Freedmen's Bureau beyond the rebel States in order to take in the State of Delaware, [laughter,] the loyal State of Delaware, I am happy to say, which did not engage in this wicked rebellion; and it is necessary to protect the freedmen in that State as well as elsewhere; and that is the reason for extending the Freedmen's Bureau beyond ...
— History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States • Wiliam H. Barnes

... in sources of wealth widely different, and would require a different management. He had determined, therefore, to send out an expedition for the purpose of obtaining more definite information than he already possessed, with the view to surrender subsequently his government of Dieppe, take up his abode in the new world, and there dedicate his remaining years to the service of God and his king. He accordingly obtained a commission from the king, associating with himself some of the principal merchants of Rouen and other cities, and made preparations for despatching a pioneer ...
— Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, Vol. 1 • Samuel de Champlain

... been more anxious to see one of our flying machines. Our system of aerial navigation is one of the most enjoyable of our material blessings, and I shall take great pleasure in giving you a taste ...
— Daybreak: A Romance of an Old World • James Cowan

... the address sent under the royal sign-manual to Parliament, it was invoked to take measures "for better securing the execution of the laws," and it acquiesced in the suggestion. Just as now, a senile executive, under the sinister influence of insane counsels, is proposing, with your assent, "to secure the better execution of the laws," ...
— The World's Best Orations, Vol. 1 (of 10) • Various

... discourses preserved by St. Athanasius in his life. 21. Ep. 2, ad Arsinoitas. 22. Ib. 23. Maij. t. 3, p. 355. 24. That under his name in Abraham Eckellensis is not of so high a pedigree. A large body of the monks of St. Basil in the East, since the seventh century, take the name of the Order of St. Antony, but retain the rule of St. Basil, comprised in his ascetic writings; and observe the same fasts, and other exercises, with all the other monks of the East, who are called of the order of St. Basil; which even the Maronites ...
— The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints - January, February, March • Alban Butler

... it. The public will doubtless soon see that this is bad for the community, but will hesitate to forego present revenue in order to reap greater future revenue until convinced that the owner will actually reforest if given the chance. Even if no actual desire to take advantage is ascribed, there may be fear that he will make no active effort to start and protect the second crop, but will merely continue the course of least expense in the hope that a new forest will establish itself, with ...
— Practical Forestry in the Pacific Northwest • Edward Tyson Allen

... Nirv[a]na release rather than of annihilation, nor in the S[a]nkhya-like[14] duality they affect, nor yet in the prominence given to self-mortification that the Jains differ most from the Buddhists. The contrast will appear more clearly when we come to deal with the latter sect. At present we take up the ...
— The Religions of India - Handbooks On The History Of Religions, Volume 1, Edited By Morris Jastrow • Edward Washburn Hopkins

... matter, is not, as we have said already, the individual thought of Francis, Peter, or John. If an individual presented himself as being reason itself, the absolute reason, and said, "I am the truth," it would be necessary to take one of three courses. If we thought that he spoke truly, and if we received his testimony, it would be necessary to worship him, for he would be God. If it were feared that he spoke truly, and those who ...
— The Heavenly Father - Lectures on Modern Atheism • Ernest Naville

... an agent had been confided to a neighboring clergyman,—"evangelical," of course, and a humble sycophant of Hannah More, but otherwise the most helpless of human beings, baptized or infidel. He contented himself with instructing a young gentleman, aged about fifteen, to take his pony and ride over to a distant cathedral town, which was honored by the abode of a virtuous though drunken surveyor. This respectable drunkard he was to engage, and also with obvious discretion to fee ...
— Memorials and Other Papers • Thomas de Quincey

... kindly, and I could not be angry. These were students of Schenectady College: would I like to see it? a beautiful location, not half a mile off. I requested to know if there was any thing to be seen there, as I did not like to take a hot walk for nothing, instead of the shady one I had proposed for myself. "Yes, there was Professor Nott"—I had of course heard of Professor Nott.— Professor Nott, who governed by moral influence and paternal sway, and who had written so largely ...
— Diary in America, Series One • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... The public sector, including publicly owned enterprises and the municipalities, plays the dominant role in the economy. Despite several interesting hydrocarbon and minerals exploration activities, it will take several years before production can materialize. Tourism is the only sector offering any near-term potential, and even this is limited due to a short season ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... differential friction of surfaces through electrochemical decomposition was now adapted by him to produce motion at the end of a circuit without the intervention of an electromagnet. In other words, he invented a telegraph instrument having a vibrator controlled by electrochemical decomposition, to take the place of a vibrating armature operated by an electromagnet, and thus opened an entirely new and unsuspected avenue ...
— Edison, His Life and Inventions • Frank Lewis Dyer and Thomas Commerford Martin

... on the one hand, and the sea-shores, on the other: It is the intermediate space between these two, that forms the habitation of plants and animals. While there is a sea-shore and a higher ground there is that which is required in the system of the world: Take these away, and there would remain an aqueous globe, in which the world would perish. But, in the natural operations of the world, the land is perishing continually; and this is that which now we want ...
— Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4) • James Hutton

... that the son of a clergyman should take such a part in the world's affairs, but one who observes will discover that, at college at least, the behaviour of sons of clergymen resembles in general as little as that of any, and less than that of most, the behaviour enjoined by the doctrines their fathers have to teach. The cause of this is ...
— Thomas Wingfold, Curate • George MacDonald

... Giorgio made Messer Baldassari refund the two hundred ducats and take the Cupid back, so Michael Angelo got nothing for his journey. Cesare Borgia presented this Cupid to Guidobaldo di Montefeltro, Duke of Urbino. After Cesare Borgia sacked the town of Urbino in 1592 he sent the Cupid to the Marchioness ...
— Michael Angelo Buonarroti • Charles Holroyd

... were protesting that it was not love, nor passion, but something more important; and of the few beautiful cold women, into whose eyes there would flash suddenly a fierce expression, a stubborn desire to take, to snatch from life more than it can give; they were no longer in their first youth, they were capricious, unstable, domineering, imprudent, and when Gomov became cold toward them then their beauty roused him to hatred, and the lace on their lingerie reminded him of the scales ...
— The House with the Mezzanine and Other Stories • Anton Tchekoff

... flourishes were over when, somewhat later, he brought his lovely little family of three to the fence to be treated to berries. It was interesting to see a fly-catcher take his fruit "on the wing," as it were; that is, fly at it, seize it, and jerk it off without alighting. The phoebe picked berries in the same way, when he occasionally condescended to investigate the attraction that brought so many strangers into ...
— Little Brothers of the Air • Olive Thorne Miller

... until the sixteenth century. The word regular has a similar history. Coming from the Latin regula, "a rule," its modern general meaning in English of "according to rule" seems very natural; but the word which began to be used in English in the fourteenth century did not take the modern meaning until the end of the sixteenth century. Before this, it too was used as a word to describe monastic orders. The "regular" clergy were priests who were also monks, while the "secular" clergy ...
— Stories That Words Tell Us • Elizabeth O'Neill

... accordance with Major-General Hurlbut's dispatch, I submit the plan of operations east of here. General Rosecrans proposes to land a force at Florence, attack and take that place, while, with a heavy body of cavalry, he penetrates Alabama north of Tennessee River, and gets into Johnson's rear. At the same time I am to strike and take Tuscumbia, and, if practicable, push my cavalry to Decatur, destroy the ...
— The Battle of Atlanta - and Other Campaigns, Addresses, Etc. • Grenville M. Dodge

... ought to take you in; but they said, God was punishing you for the death of the labourer and the child and they didn't wish to interfere. ...
— Selected Polish Tales • Various

... agreed, is it?" said Cornelius. "If I get a legacy, I'll take you into my store. If you get it, you will go into ...
— Herbert Carter's Legacy • Horatio Alger

... building of an impassable wall along the line of separation—and yet not quite an impassable one, for under the guise of neutrality it would tie the hands of Union men and freely pass supplies from among them to the insurrectionists, which it could not do as an open enemy. At a stroke it would take all the trouble off the hands of secession, except only what proceeds from the external blockade. It would do for the disunionists that which, of all things, they most desire—feed them well and give them disunion without a ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... that if such stimulants were wholly done away, the Gospel would have far mightier sway, and human nature generally assume a higher character. Pure moral stimulus would take the place of what is low, sensual, and selfish. Better health, better temper, higher intellect, and more generous benevolence ...
— Select Temperance Tracts • American Tract Society

... said he; "the Marquis is certainly sincere. It would be wrong not to take advantage of his generosity. Such, at least, is my opinion. Intrust this letter to me. I will consult the baron, and to-morrow I will ...
— The Honor of the Name • Emile Gaboriau

... to come up to Leeds to see her dying darling, she "shore for the siller," rather than borrow it. And her son's life is like her own—a most pure, joyous, valiant little epic. Robert does not even take to work as something beyond himself, uninteresting and painful, which, however, must be done courageously: he lives in it, enjoys it as his proper element, one which is no more a burden and an exertion to ...
— Literary and General Lectures and Essays • Charles Kingsley

... It was a quiet session—none of that curtained cabinet, tambourine-playing business, you understand; but a plain revelation from my boy's spirit through the medium of a refined, cultured woman. I'm sorry, now, I didn't take my wife with me to-day, but I feared it might not be so agreeable, and I tried it out myself first. But we ...
— The Come Back • Carolyn Wells

... Spring when grandma gave back my "girl clothes" and wearily told me she had hired a boy to drive in the cows, and a man to help to milk; and that Georgia was to look after the house, and I to take her own place in the corrals, because she was sick and would have to be cupped and bled before ...
— The Expedition of the Donner Party and its Tragic Fate • Eliza Poor Donner Houghton

... abolition of slavery, signs of disunion between the nations. It is the purest and best proof of friendship England has ever shown us, and will, I am confident, be so received. I earnestly trust that all who have begun to take in hand the cause will be in nothing daunted, but persevere to the end; for though everything else be against us, Christ is certainly on our side and He must at last prevail, and it will be done, "not by ...
— The Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe • Charles Edward Stowe

... see her again until five days ago, when I came across her in an aerated bread shop. I had gone in to get a glass of milk and a bun, and she brought them to me. I recognised her in a moment.' His face lighted up with quite a human smile. 'I take tea there every afternoon now,' he added, glancing towards the ...
— Novel Notes • Jerome K. Jerome

... opportunely chances to be in Natchitoches at the time. It is a tract of territory surrounding, and formerly belonging to, an old mission by the monks, long ago abandoned. Dupre has purchased it; and all now remaining to be done is to complete the make-up of the migrating party, and start off to take possession. ...
— The Death Shot - A Story Retold • Mayne Reid

... door opened, and Agatha Ismay, wrapped in a long cloak, came in. She permitted Winifred to take it from her, and then sank down into a chair. There was a strained look in her eyes, and her face ...
— Hawtrey's Deputy • Harold Bindloss

... anxieties a letter was brought me from home. The ten weeks were up when I could begin to expect an answer to my uncle's letter asking my father's permission for me to take service under Bonaparte, and I tore it eagerly open, hardly knowing, since hostilities would be so long delayed, whether I most hoped that it would contain his permission or his refusal. In my haste I had not noticed that it was not my father's writing on the outside, and that made it ...
— The Rose of Old St. Louis • Mary Dillon

... of a mile into the lake a mighty discussion suddenly arose amongst the crew. The oarsmen ceased their labours to take part in it. Eight wetted brown ...
— Two on the Trail - A Story of the Far Northwest • Hulbert Footner

... to take it regardless of Spain, "Let it be signified to me through any channel (say Mr. J. Rhea)," wrote the Major General to the President, "that the possession of the Floridas would be desirable to the United States, and in sixty days ...
— The Reign of Andrew Jackson • Frederic Austin Ogg

... I have warned you. To what purpose? You are inclined to believe in Phil rather than to believe in me, and you will be so inclined to the end of the chapter. You remember that man Palmer, at Rugely, who used to go to church, and take the sacrament?" ...
— Birds of Prey • M. E. Braddon

... to join in the chorus. For six weeks,[3218] the profaners of churches come to the hall and display their dance-house buffooneries, and the Convention has not only to put up with these, but also to take part in them.—Never, even in imperial Rome, under Nero and Heliogabalus, did a senate descend ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 4 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 3 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... Suffrage: universal adult at age NA Elections: National Assembly: note - The National Unity Charter outlining the principles for constitutional government was adopted by a national referendum on 5 February 1991; new elections to the National Assembly are to take place 29 June 1993; presidential elections are to take place 1 June 1993 Executive branch: president; chairman of the Central Committee of the National Party of Unity and ...
— The 1993 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... match. I reckon Jeb Collard n' all his summer folks will go up on th' hay-rig from West Baxter. You wait till to-morrer night, Pep. Mamsy'll make you up a pan of fresh doughnuts fer to-morrer night, won't you, Mamsy? Don't you take on now, Pepsy girl; you jes' go ter ...
— Pee-wee Harris • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... all this to-morrow," he said; "and if I take this house I must have an alteration made in this door, so that it may open with a lock, instead of by main violence, as at present; but if, in the morning, when I view Anderbury House, I can avoid an entrance into this region, I will do ...
— Varney the Vampire - Or the Feast of Blood • Thomas Preskett Prest

... seventh heaven," says he, promptly. "Be it a Fool's Paradise or otherwise, I shall take up my abode there for the present. And now you will ...
— April's Lady - A Novel • Margaret Wolfe Hungerford

... and vowed to war. Rise, clan of Kings, rise, champions of man's race, Heaven's sun-clad army militant on earth, One victory gained, the realm decreed is ours. The bridal bells ring out, for Low with High Is wed in endless nuptials. It is past, The sin, the exile, and the grief. O man, Take thou, renewed, thy sister-mate by hand; Know well thy dignity, and hers: return, And meet once more Thy Maker, for He walks Once more within thy garden, in the cool Of the ...
— The Legends of Saint Patrick • Aubrey de Vere

... see that, too, Carlos, and the Americans in the flames. Ah, but the day when we are to take the capital seems a long way ...
— The Campaign of the Jungle - or, Under Lawton through Luzon • Edward Stratemeyer

... and opinion. It ignored facts and the people distrusted it. The religious reformation in France became identified with political factions, which brought the church into a prominent place in the government and made it take an important place in the revolution. It had succeeded in suppressing all who sought liberty, either political or religious, and because of its prominence in affairs, it was the first institution to feel the storm of the revolution. The church in France ...
— History of Human Society • Frank W. Blackmar

... ought to be diminished." This was carried, by 283 votes to 215, in a House where four years before the total Opposition mustered only a hundred. Measures to cut down sinecures, to limit the secret service fund, to take away opportunities for royal corruption, were introduced by Burke and, although ...
— The Wars Between England and America • T. C. Smith

... Hildebrand answered; "I desire your favors more than the King's favor, and if you will give me yourself I will take care of what ...
— The Proud Prince • Justin Huntly McCarthy

... finished with el-Razi, and who has hence been usually referred to in the history of medicine as Rhazes. He was born about 850 at Raj, in the Province of Chorasan in Persia. He seems to have had a liberal early education in philosophy and in philology and literature. He did not take up medicine until later in life, and, according to tradition, supported himself as a singer until he was thirty years of age. Then he devoted himself to medical studies with the ardor and the success ...
— Old-Time Makers of Medicine • James J. Walsh

... This land is of a moderate height, and has a very barren Aspect; not a Tree to be seen upon it, only a few Small Shrubs. There were several white patches, on which the sun's rays reflected very strongly, which I take to be a kind of Marble such as we have seen in many places of this Country, particularly ...
— Captain Cook's Journal During the First Voyage Round the World • James Cook

... said, "I see that you do not believe a word that I say. It will be best if you take me straight to those who have ...
— Oddsfish! • Robert Hugh Benson

... for it but to make a clean breast of the whole thing to Nick. The trivial incident of the cigars-how trivial it now seemed!—showed her the kind of stand he would take, and communicated to her something of his own uncompromising energy. She would tell him the whole story in the morning, and try to find a way out with him: Susy's faith in her power of finding a way out was inexhaustible. ...
— The Glimpses of the Moon • Edith Wharton

... hopes of man began to darken upon them. Where they expected that every man would make a fortress for them in his very heart, they were almost abandoned. But their resolution remained unchanged. They, therefore, resolved as a final resource to take up their position in the most inaccessible part of the country. As they proceeded through the hilly grounds, skirting the Tipperary collieries, a crowd began to gather around them, and they saw what ...
— The Felon's Track • Michael Doheny

... of these islands were excellent carpenters and ship-builders. "They make many very light vessels, which they take through the vicinity for sale in a very curious manner. They build a large vessel, undecked, without iron nail or any fastening. Then, according to the measure of its hull, they make another vessel that fits into it. Within that they ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVI, 1609 • H.E. Blair

... for him who injures M'fosa your son; upon this will I hang him. And if there be more men than one who take to the work of slaughter, behold! I will have yet another tree cut and hauled, and put in a place and upon that will I hang the other man. All men shall know this sign, the high stick as my fetish; and it shall watch the evil hearts and carry me all thoughts, good and evil. And then I tell you, ...
— Bones - Being Further Adventures in Mr. Commissioner Sanders' Country • Edgar Wallace

... halter on it; it had been abandoned on account of lameness, from which it had recovered, and had since been starving. They harnessed it up and it brought in the cart; and that night, being given a good feed of oats, it died from shock. Another skeleton was found in the morning to take its place; but this skeleton grew fat. We used to laugh at these misfortunes, but the poor horses had a cruel time, especially the English ones; no one would have recognised the Horse Artillery, although the tragic skeletons that drew the guns still affected some imitation of their ...
— The Relief of Mafeking • Filson Young

... just the shade of a threat in the voice of this slender youngster, and Robert Macklin had been an amateur pugilist of much brawn and a good deal of boxing skill. He cast a wary eye on Ronicky; one punch would settle that fellow. The man Gregg might be a harder nut to crack, but it would not take long to finish them both. Robert Macklin thrust his ...
— Ronicky Doone • Max Brand

... height of heaven? . . . . Can he judge through the dark cloud? Thick clouds are a covering to him that he seeth not," etc. All agreed that God displayed His presence in the heaven, but Job had inferred from this that God could not know and did not take notice of such actions of men as were hidden behind the intervening clouds. Not that Job was atheistic; no, but probably denied to God the attribute of omnipresence and omniscience. Acts 17:24-28—"For in him we live, and move, and have our being." Without ...
— The Great Doctrines of the Bible • Rev. William Evans

... said Nigel, "to have all ready for our start before the feast of St. Luke, for there is much to be done in the time. You will have leisure, therefore, if it please you to take service under me, in which to learn your devoir. Bertrand, my daughter's page, is hot to go; but in sooth he is over young for such rough work ...
— The White Company • Arthur Conan Doyle

... so well, I know the treacherous seeming Of days like this; they are too heavenly fair. Those waves that laugh like happy children dreaming, Are mighty forces brewing some despair For thoughtless hearts, and ere the hour of need, Let mine take heed. ...
— Yesterdays • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... Kent Terrace, where Macready once lived, but larger than his." Again (this having gone off): "Barnaby has suffered so much from the house-hunting, that I mustn't chop to-day." Then (for the matter of the Middle Temple), "I return the form. It's the right temple, I take for granted. Barnaby moves, not at race-horse speed, but yet as fast (I think) as under these unsettled circumstances could possibly be expected." Or again: "All well. Barnaby has reached his tenth page. I have just turned lazy, and have passed into Christabel, ...
— The Life of Charles Dickens, Vol. I-III, Complete • John Forster

... wondered how far down a man could go—and live. It was the first thing that ever mastered him. The temptation to leave Framtree and to take even a flying trip to India—since New York was not for him—this was tangible, and he whipped it, though the conflict used up all his power. He had nothing left to combat the vague psychic thrall that ...
— Fate Knocks at the Door - A Novel • Will Levington Comfort

... could never have gone there, I am quite sure. Even as it is, I have just now written to Dolby (who is in New York), to see my doctor there, and ask him to send me some composing medicine that I can take at night, inasmuch as without sleep I cannot get through. However sympathetic and devoted the people are about me, they can not be got to comprehend that one's being able to do the two hours with spirit when the ...
— The Letters of Charles Dickens - Vol. 2 (of 3), 1857-1870 • Charles Dickens

... the meeting-house, to which the traveling schoolmaster would come to give four weeks' schooling, was scarcely high enough for a man to stand straight in; it had holes for windows and greased paper to take the place of glass. But in such a place Abraham Lincoln "got his schooling" for a few weeks only in "reading, writing, and ciphering"; here he was again and again head of his class; and here he "spelled down" all the big boys and girls in the ...
— The Elson Readers, Book 5 • William H. Elson and Christine M. Keck

... the friar was joking, but the friar was talking seriously, and indicated a servant of his to take possession of the land. Poor Tales turned pale, he felt a buzzing in his ears, he saw in the red mist that rose before his eyes his wife and daughter, pallid, emaciated, dying, victims of the intermittent fevers—then he saw ...
— The Reign of Greed - Complete English Version of 'El Filibusterismo' • Jose Rizal

... shut the door when he had vanished. I was so shaken and confused, and half paralysed, I felt I could not even cry out; it was as if something had a grip on my spirit, I feared to stir, and sat up all night, fearing to take my eyes off the door, not daring to go and shut it. Later on I got an umbrella and walked tremblingly, and pushed the door close without fastening it. I feared to touch it with my hand. I felt such a relief when I saw daylight and heard the ...
— Real Ghost Stories • William T. Stead

... quietly, "when you take Eunice to her grandmother, at Naki's house, say nothing. Remember, you are to speak to no one of ...
— The Automobile Girls in the Berkshires - The Ghost of Lost Man's Trail • Laura Dent Crane

... of the Tumongong of Parang, Mr Roberts," said the lieutenant, "and he has come on board to see the ship. Take him round and show him everything, especially the armoury, and let him understand the power of the ...
— Middy and Ensign • G. Manville Fenn

... Nor in the Angel-circle flaming round, Nor in the million worlds that blaze beneath Is one that can withstand thy wrath's hot breath— Woe in thy frown—in thy smile, victory! Hear my last prayer—I ask no mortal wreath; Let but these eyes my rescued country see, Then take my ...
— The Evolution of Expression Vol. I • Charles Wesley Emerson

... alias Nikola el Escoces, alias el Demonio, alias el Diabletto, on the twelfth of May last, did feloniously and upon the high seas piratically seize a certain ship called the Victoria... um... um, the properties of Hyman Cohen and others... and did steal and take therefrom six hundred and thirty barrels of coffee of the value of... um... um... um... one hundred and one barrels of coffee of the value of... ninety-four ...
— Romance • Joseph Conrad and F.M. Hueffer

... among his blankets, drew his cap down over his eyes and let out another link of speed. At last he was free to take up the problem that occupied his leisure moments. His wife had gone South with her father on the very day when he had expected her to lift the veil from their marriage, and an acknowledgement of the justice of her anger caused him to keep the secret still, awaiting her decision. He could count ...
— The Mayor of Warwick • Herbert M. Hopkins

... they'd take more notice afther a while. But they're not used to bein' prosperous, an' they don't know themselves at all. Ye can't cultivate politics on low feed. 'Tis the high livin' that makes the Parliamint men that can talk for twenty-four hours at a sthretch. An' these chaps is gettin' ...
— Ireland as It Is - And as It Would be Under Home Rule • Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)

... at Versailles, I meant to bring again under the view of the Count de Vergennes, the whole subject of our commerce with France; but the number of audiences of ambassadors and other ministers, which take place, of course, before mine, and which seldom, indeed, leave me an opportunity of audience at all, prevented me that day. I was only able to ask of the Count de Vergennes, as a particular favor, that he would permit me to wait on him some day that week. He did so, and I went to Versailles ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... He was running. He said it was of no use. He had seen men brained. There were legions of Indians. He said there was nothing left but flight. He tried to take me ...
— Montlivet • Alice Prescott Smith

... ordinance was, in substance, the poverty of the classes quoted—a poverty which was of course the inevitable result of slavery. To make the punishment for no crime effective, the city government was empowered "to appoint a person or persons to take those sentenced to labor from their place of confinement to the place appointed for their working, and to watch them while at labor and return them before sundown to their place of confinement; and, if they shall be found afterwards offending, such security may again be required, ...
— Twenty Years of Congress, Volume 2 (of 2) • James Gillespie Blaine

... upon the Danes, who found York when they captured it very rectangular, for so the Romans built it, and so the Angles kept it; but nothing would serve the Danes but to crook its streets and call them gates, so that the real gates of the city have to be called bars, or else the stranger might take them for streets. If he asked another wayfarer, he could sometimes baffle the streets, and get to the point he aimed at, but, whether he did or not, he could always amuse himself in them; they would take a friendly interest in him, and show him the old houses ...
— Seven English Cities • W. D. Howells

... Shandon is," continued Leland. "I shall be surprised if he doesn't tire of the life here in six weeks, put through a sale of cattle, take the money and go again. With him away our chance becomes a certainty. In any case, I am going ahead with our work. I have had Garth look into the title of the Dry Lands and he finds ...
— The Short Cut • Jackson Gregory

... Ely to take the See of Winchester. He reconsecrated our church when the chancel was enlarged and the new aisle added. He carried on vigorously work only begun under Bishop Wilberforce. Under him Diocesan Synods, the Girls' Friendly Society, and the Examination of Senior Scholars ...
— Old Times at Otterbourne • Charlotte M. Yonge

... knows that I cannot do this without money, and has offered the assistance which I want. I would rather that you should tell her how much I want, and that I want it now, than that I should do so. That is all. If you are half the woman that I take you to be, you will understand this ...
— Can You Forgive Her? • Anthony Trollope

... the rest of you. Last night I come pretty near makin' up my mind to go back. Little old shack back there in the greasewood didn't look so bad, after all. Only I do hate like sin to bach, and a fellow couldn't take a woman out there in the desert to live, unless he had money to make her comfortable. So I'm going to give up my homestead—if I can find some easy mark to buy out my relinquishment. Don't want to let it slide, yuh see, 'cause the improvements is worth a little something, ...
— Starr, of the Desert • B. M Bower

... undulations of surfaces and the relations of masses, you may proceed to draw more complicated and beautiful things.[214] And first, the boughs of trees, now not in mere dark relief, but in full rounding. Take the first bit of branch or stump that comes to hand, with a fork in it; cut off the ends of the forking branches, so as to leave the whole only about a foot in length; get a piece of paper the same size, fix your bit of branch in some place ...
— The Crown of Wild Olive • John Ruskin

... European kingdoms. In the third class, along with the Sumatrans and a few other states of the eastern archipelago, I should rank the nations on the northern coast of Africa, and the more polished Arabs. The fourth class, with the less civilized Sumatrans, will take in the people of the new discovered islands in the South Sea; perhaps the celebrated Mexican and Peruvian empires; the Tartar hordes, and all those societies of people in various parts of the globe, who, possessing personal property, and acknowledging some species of established ...
— The History of Sumatra - Containing An Account Of The Government, Laws, Customs And - Manners Of The Native Inhabitants • William Marsden

... Prolonged marches, great anxiety, sleeping on wet ground, being frequently soaked to the skin by heavy rains, all these things had told upon him, and now that the necessity for exertion was over, a sort of low fever seized him, and he was forced to take to his bed. The leech whom Harry called in told him that Jacob needed rest and care more than medicine. He gave him, however, cooling drinks, and said that when the fever passed he would need strengthening ...
— Friends, though divided - A Tale of the Civil War • G. A. Henty

... proprietors of the larger estates. Such proprietorship is, of course, open to only a few. The problem, which is both social and political, appears in a class that cannot or will not engage in manual labor, the well-educated or fairly-educated sons of men of fair income and a social position. Many of these take some professional course. But there is not room for so many in so small a country, and the professions are greatly overcrowded. The surplus either loafs and lives by its wits or at the expense of the family, or turns to the Government for a "job." ...
— Cuba, Old and New • Albert Gardner Robinson

... add that financial measures are entirely unsuited to a referendum. Financial and executive control go together, and to take either of them out of the hands of the majority in the House of Commons is not to reform our system but to destroy it root and branch. The same is not true of legislative control. There are cases in which a government might fairly submit a legislative ...
— Liberalism • L. T. Hobhouse

... he look at it?" demanded Edith. "How else can any one look at it? Isn't it murder to take human life, and if one does not prevent suicide when he might, isn't it the same as if ...
— The Pagans • Arlo Bates

... cidevant blacksmith, All his domains and his herds, and his patriarchal demeanor; Much they marvelled to hear his tales of the soil and the climate, And of the prairie; whose numberless herds were his who would take them; Each one thought in his heart, that he, too, would go and do likewise. Thus they ascended the steps, and, crossing the breezy veranda, Entered the hall of the house, where already the supper of Basil Waited his late return; and they rested ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... me, making the sign of turning a key and pointing to the bag. Her mother interfered at this point and showed Helen by signs that she must not touch the bag. Her face flushed, and when her mother attempted to take the bag from her, she grew very angry. I attracted her attention by showing her my watch and letting her hold it in her hand. Instantly the tempest subsided, and we went upstairs together. Here I opened ...
— Story of My Life • Helen Keller

... husbands are free to take these trifles for arithmetical estimates, or arithmetical estimates for trifles. The illusions of life are the best things in life; that which is most respectable in life is our futile credulity. Do there not exist many ...
— Analytical Studies • Honore de Balzac

... girl was as mad as a wet hen when she pried her fingers apart, and they rode home in silence. At the gate she said to him, "Bije Easus, I never till to-night knew what a horrid name I was going to take upon myself, and I have made up my mind that I cannot go through the remainder of my natural life in Chicago, being alluded to as a 'little female Bije Easus.' Mr. Easus, I trust we part friends. If you can come to me by any ...
— Peck's Sunshine - Being a Collection of Articles Written for Peck's Sun, - Milwaukee, Wis. - 1882 • George W. Peck

... As regards food, potatoes take the place of bread. There are about twenty acres under cultivation, each man having his own patches. They never change the seed and rarely the ground. A man may enclose as many patches as he likes provided he cultivates them. They used to manure their ...
— Three Years in Tristan da Cunha • K. M. Barrow

... "I take that as a compliment. I am a tramp no longer, but a respectable and, I may add, well-to-do citizen. Now I ...
— The Store Boy • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... glad you did not go with them. I have something to tell you. If you knew how happy I am, you would clap your hands, Will. But come, sit you down there, and be my good big brother, and I will kneel here and take your hand. We must keep close to dad, and then he will feel happiness in the air. The poor old love, if we could only tell him. But I sometimes think his heart has gone to heaven already, and takes a part in all our joys and ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume XV • Robert Louis Stevenson

... the northern island, to take bearings and search for water, and the boat's crew had axes to cut some fire wood. Four or five Indians made their appearance, but as we advanced they retired; and I therefore left them to themselves, having usually found that to bring on an interview with the Australians, ...
— A Voyage to Terra Australis Volume 2 • Matthew Flinders

... store by your honey, I guess, STRANger," said Gershom, as le Bourdon unlocked the fastenings and removed the chain, "if a body may judge by the kear (care) you take on't! Now, down our way we ain't half so partic'lar; Dolly and Blossom never so much as putting up a bar to the door, even when I sleep out, which is about half the time, now the summer is fairly ...
— Oak Openings • James Fenimore Cooper

... waste,— Are but the solemn decorations all Of the great tomb of man. The golden sun, The planets, all the infinite host of heaven, Are shining on the sad abodes of death, Through the still lapse of ages. All that tread The globe are but a handful to the tribes That slumber in its bosom.—Take the wings Of morning, pierce the Barcan wilderness, Or lose thyself in the continuous woods Where rolls the Oregon, and hears no sound, Save his own dashings—yet the dead are there: And millions in those solitudes, since first The flight of years began, have laid them down In ...
— Graded Poetry: Seventh Year - Edited by Katherine D. Blake and Georgia Alexander • Various

... of the Fourcades regarding her conduct in their house at Tarbes was biased, she said. She had refused to take up some people recommended by her landlady. The young man who had visited her never remained longer than after ten o'clock or half-past, and she saw nothing ...
— She Stands Accused • Victor MacClure

... Once or twice as I stood waiting there for things to accomplish themselves, I could not resist an impulse to laugh at my miserable quandary. I felt all the wretcheder for the lack of a breakfast. Hunger and a lack of blood-corpuscles take all the manhood from a man. I perceived pretty clearly that I had not the stamina either to resist what the captain chose to do to expel me, or to force myself upon Montgomery and his companion. So I waited passively upon fate; and the work of transferring Montgomery's possessions ...
— The Island of Doctor Moreau • H. G. Wells

... merely accidental. To these are to be added all individuals of either sex who by the law are obliged to obtain from the police licenses to exercise their trade, as pedlars, tinkers, masters of puppet-shows, wild beasts, etc. These, on receiving their passes, inscribe themselves, and take the oaths as spies; and are forced to send in their regular reports of what they hear or see. Prostitutes, who, all over this country, are under the necessity of paying for regular licenses, are obliged ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... was never produced, but that it has existed from all eternity. Neither is there any such thing as death. Those who perish about us every day are simply changed, either they take on other forms or are removed to some other place. God cannot be destroyed, and as all things are parts of the Deity everything lives and has always lived, seeming death being simply change. Remnants of these doctrines are found in ...
— The God-Idea of the Ancients - or Sex in Religion • Eliza Burt Gamble

... let Mr. Gilmore name an early day. Of course you never intended that there should be a long engagement. Such a thing, where there is no possible reason for it, must be out of the question. And it will be much better to take advantage of the fine weather than to put it off till the winter has nearly come. Fix some day in August or early in September. I am sure you will be much happier married than you are single; and he will be gratified, which is, I suppose, to count ...
— The Vicar of Bullhampton • Anthony Trollope

... and I'm not sure but he richly deserved your words. If he has good mettle he will be all the better for them. If he spoke from mere impulse and goes back to his old life and associations, I'm glad my little girl was loyal and brave enough to lodge in his memory truths that he won't forget. Take the good old doctrine to your relenting heart and don't forgive him until he 'brings forth fruits meet for repentance.' I'm proud of you that you gave the young aristocrat such a wholesome lesson in regard to genuine American ...
— An Original Belle • E. P. Roe

... this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... possibility of his concluding his career by water. Still, his escape was extraordinary. He had taken a boat at Palace Yard to cross to Lambeth. As he was standing up in the boat, immediately on his getting in, the waterman awkwardly and hastily shoved off, and George, accustomed as he was to take care of himself, lost his balance, and plumped head foremost into the water. The tide was running strong, and between the weight of his clothes, and the suddenness of the shock, he was utterly helpless. The parliamentary laughers say, that the true wonder of the case is, that he has ...
— Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 366, April, 1846 • Various

... tone, was the wife of Richard), the knight felt something so soothing to his feelings in learning that Edith had been no partner to the fraud practised on him, and so interesting to his curiosity in the scene which was about to take place, that, instead of prosecuting his more prudent purpose of an instant retreat, he looked anxiously, on the contrary, for some rent or crevice by means of which be might be made eye as well as ear witness to what ...
— The Talisman • Sir Walter Scott

... luggage taken out of the car, and tell my chauffeur I shall want him at ten o'clock to-morrow morning, and that he should take the car to the hotel-garage, wherever it is, and sleep here. I will have some tea ...
— Mr. Prohack • E. Arnold Bennett

... children say, at that inn," said he. "I seem to grow colder every step that I take away from it. No, no; ...
— The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Magazine Edition • Arthur Conan Doyle

... die?" sharply interrupted the general. "Why do you drivel? You know I detest beds and blankets. Drop it! Here, take this," and he gave him a sheet of crested paper folded in four, which was lying beside him. "Read it, please. Aloud! so that ...
— The Most Interesting Stories of All Nations • Julian Hawthorne



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