Online dictionaryOnline dictionary
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'



Make   /meɪk/   Listen
Make

verb
(past & past part. made; pres. part. making)
1.
Engage in.  Synonym: do.  "Make an effort" , "Do research" , "Do nothing" , "Make revolution"
2.
Give certain properties to something.  Synonym: get.  "She made us look silly" , "He made a fool of himself at the meeting" , "Don't make this into a big deal" , "This invention will make you a millionaire" , "Make yourself clear"
3.
Make or cause to be or to become.  Synonym: create.  "Create a furor"
4.
Cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner.  Synonyms: cause, get, have, induce, stimulate.  "My children finally got me to buy a computer" , "My wife made me buy a new sofa"
5.
Give rise to; cause to happen or occur, not always intentionally.  Synonyms: cause, do.  "Make a stir" , "Cause an accident"
6.
Create or manufacture a man-made product.  Synonyms: create, produce.  "The company has been making toys for two centuries"
7.
Make, formulate, or derive in the mind.  Synonym: draw.  "Draw a conclusion" , "Draw parallels" , "Make an estimate" , "What do you make of his remarks?"
8.
Compel or make somebody or something to act in a certain way.  "Heat makes you sweat"
9.
Create by artistic means.  Synonym: create.  "Schoenberg created twelve-tone music" , "Picasso created Cubism" , "Auden made verses"
10.
Earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages.  Synonyms: bring in, clear, earn, gain, pull in, realise, realize, take in.  "She earns a lot in her new job" , "This merger brought in lots of money" , "He clears $5,000 each month"
11.
Create or design, often in a certain way.  Synonym: do.  "I did this piece in wood to express my love for the forest"
12.
To compose or represent:.  Synonyms: constitute, form.  "The branches made a roof" , "This makes a fine introduction"
13.
Reach a goal, e.g.,.  Synonyms: get to, progress to, reach.  "We made it!" , "She may not make the grade"
14.
Be or be capable of being changed or made into.  "He will make a fine father"
15.
Make by shaping or bringing together constituents.  "Make a cake" , "Make a wall of stones"
16.
Perform or carry out.  "Make a move" , "Make advances" , "Make a phone call"
17.
Make by combining materials and parts.  Synonyms: build, construct.  "Some eccentric constructed an electric brassiere warmer"
18.
Change from one form into another.  "Make lead into gold" , "Make clay into bricks"
19.
Act in a certain way so as to acquire.  "Make enemies"
20.
Charge with a function; charge to be.  Synonyms: name, nominate.  "She was made president of the club"
21.
Achieve a point or goal.  Synonyms: get, have.  "The Brazilian team got 4 goals" , "She made 29 points that day"
22.
Reach a destination, either real or abstract.  Synonyms: arrive at, attain, gain, hit, reach.  "The water reached the doorstep" , "We barely made it to the finish line" , "I have to hit the MAC machine before the weekend starts"
23.
Institute, enact, or establish.  Synonyms: establish, lay down.
24.
Carry out or commit.  "Commit a faux-pas"
25.
Form by assembling individuals or constituents.
26.
Organize or be responsible for.  Synonyms: give, have, hold, throw.  "Have, throw, or make a party" , "Give a course"
27.
Put in order or neaten.  Synonym: make up.  "Make up a room"
28.
Head into a specified direction.  Synonym: take.  "We made for the mountains"
29.
Have a bowel movement.  Synonyms: ca-ca, crap, defecate, shit, stool, take a crap, take a shit.
30.
Undergo fabrication or creation.
31.
Be suitable for.
32.
Add up to.
33.
Amount to.
34.
Constitute the essence of.
35.
Appear to begin an activity.  "She made as if to say hello to us"
36.
Proceed along a path.  Synonym: work.  "Make one's way into the forest"
37.
Reach in time.
38.
Gather and light the materials for.
39.
Prepare for eating by applying heat.  Synonyms: cook, fix, prepare, ready.  "Can you make me an omelette?" , "Fix breakfast for the guests, please"
40.
Induce to have sex.  Synonyms: score, seduce.  "Did you score last night?" , "Harry made Sally"
41.
Assure the success of.
42.
Represent fictitiously, as in a play, or pretend to be or act like.  Synonyms: make believe, pretend.
43.
Consider as being.
44.
Calculate as being.
45.
Cause to be enjoyable or pleasurable.
46.
Favor the development of.
47.
Develop into.
48.
Behave in a certain way.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |
Add this dictionary
to your browser search bar





"Make" Quotes from Famous Books



... growing things, to see that water out yonder and the blue overhead. What is it, Dr. Llewellyn says: 'To thank the Lord for a life so sweet.' WE all do, don't we? I can put it into words, or sing it, but you two? Yes, you can make God understand just as well. Let's all thank Him together—you as He has taught you, and I as He ...
— Peggy Stewart: Navy Girl at Home • Gabrielle E. Jackson

... informed of the welcome the general had given her son, thought it her duty to make him a visit of gratitude. Bonaparte, being much pleased with Josephine in this first interview, returned her visit. They met again frequently; and as is well known, one event led to another, until she became the first Empress of the French; and I can assert from the numerous proofs ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... Elisabeth seemed about to make some passionate rejoinder. Then, all at once, she checked herself, and again Sara was conscious of that curiously secretive expression in her eyes, as though she were ...
— The Hermit of Far End • Margaret Pedler

... not, however, influence upon Giorgione that is most interesting, but Giorgione's influence upon others. One of his great achievements was the invention of the genre picture. He was the first lyrical painter: the first to make a canvas represent a single mood, much as a sonnet does. He was the first to combine colour and pattern to no other end but sheer beauty. The picture had a subject, of course, but the subject no longer mattered. Il fuoco Giorgionesco—the Giorgionesque fire—was the phrase invented to describe ...
— A Wanderer in Venice • E.V. Lucas

... any time she may find the German heel upon her face, vindictively punishing her for her lack of enthusiasm for Teutonic brotherhood. Hadn't she better get herself a little larger and stronger now; hadn't she better help to make the ending of the German threat more conclusive, and link herself definitely with the grand alliance of the Western Powers? Now she could make a very good bargain indeed. If she inquired she would find Britain ready enough to guarantee the ...
— Current History, A Monthly Magazine - The European War, March 1915 • New York Times

... of conducting power possessed by them; and ultimately shell-lac and sulphur were chosen, after many experiments, as the dielectrics best fitted for the investigation. No difficulty can arise in perceiving how the possession of a feeble degree of conducting power tends to make a body produce effects, which would seem to indicate that it had a greater capability of allowing induction through it than another body perfect in its insulation. This source of error has been that which I have found most difficult to obviate ...
— Experimental Researches in Electricity, Volume 1 • Michael Faraday

... do not be angry with them; for are they not as good as a play, trying their hand at paltry reforms such as I was describing; they are always fancying that by legislation they will make an end of frauds in contracts, and the other rascalities which I was mentioning, not knowing that they are in reality cutting off the heads of ...
— The Republic • Plato

... complaint. When this act of justice was performed, Wilder entered the skiff; and, seeing that his companions were seated at their oars, he bade them to pull down the harbour, admonishing them, at the same time, to make as ...
— The Red Rover • James Fenimore Cooper

... and never so intently as to be distressing; for anything like strain is against the very nature of the craft. Sometimes things go easily, the refrains fall into their place as if of their own accord, and it becomes something of the nature of an intellectual tennis; you must make your poem as the rhymes will go, just as you must strike your ball as your adversary played it. So that these forms are suitable rather for those who wish to make verses than for those who wish to express opinions. Sometimes, on the other ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 3 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... pleased with these words, and with the dark curses which the dwarf pronounced upon the gold; for he loved wrong-doing, for wrong-doing's sake, and he knew that no curses could ever make his own life more cheerless than it always had been. So he thanked Andvari for his curses and his treasures; and, throwing the magic net upon his shoulder, he sprang again into the air, and was carried swiftly back to ...
— The Story of Siegfried • James Baldwin

... and Allah hath blessed me with no child save one daughter, who resembleth thee in beauty and grace; and I am now waxed unfit for the conduct of the state. She is shine, O my son; and, if this my land please thee and thou be willing to abide and make thy home here, I will marry thee to her and give thee my kingdom and so be at rest." When Princess Budur heard this, she bowed her head and her forehead sweated for shame, and she said to herself. "How shall I do, and I a woman? If I refuse and depart from him, I cannot be safe but ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... I had from Mr Pickersgill and Mr Wales, men on whose veracity I could depend; and therefore I determined to leave the island the next morning, since nothing was to be obtained that could make it worth my while to stay longer; for the water which we had sent on board, was not much better than if it had been taken up out of ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 14 • Robert Kerr

... kind of dream-world, and know that your own soul's life is the one real thing for you. And don't write any more about how circumstances hold you back. When you have got to work you will know that you are given your soul for no purpose but to fight circumstances; that they are the things to make you fight. When they are removed, as I know to my cost, there is still the same necessity of fighting; only it is like a horse who has to win a ...
— Love's Pilgrimage • Upton Sinclair

... be so totally opposite the real, there is no other name for it than as the unreal, and the unreal being a counterfeit of the real, must be a lie, as the nature of a lie is to make false claims, ...
— The Right Knock - A Story • Helen Van-Anderson

... be laid out for a sick or old poor person. This method has an excellent effect on the minds of children; it incites them to industry, teaches self-denial, and the feelings of love and charity which are thus early instilled into their tender minds, make a lasting impression. ...
— Domestic Cookery, Useful Receipts, and Hints to Young Housekeepers • Elizabeth E. Lea

... of the scurvy, so long as we could get a plentiful supply of other vegetables. But, that I might not be disappointed in my views, I gave orders that no grog should be served in either ship. I myself, and the officers, continued to make use of the sugar-cane beer whenever we could get materials for brewing it. A few hops, of which we had some on board, improved it much. It has the taste of new malt beer; and I believe no one will doubt of its being very wholesome. And yet my inconsiderate ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16 • Robert Kerr

... wholly in the new system of spelling, and these necessarily will have to be assessed as evidence of contemporary English pronunciation by students of the subject. It is not easy to be sure how accurate a phonetic observer and transcriber G. W. was, but if we make some allowance for misprints, we find a certain consistency in his transcriptions, and an apparent freedom from any bias given by the traditional spelling, which make one think he was moderately reliable. In this connexion it is of some importance to find out, if possible, where he came from. He ...
— Magazine, or Animadversions on the English Spelling (1703) • G. W.

... my life I found myself in need of thoughtful consideration before I could make up my mind. Therese's letter had entirely upset all my ideas, and, feeling that I could not answer it a once, I told the messenger to call the ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... her two new sheaves and walked towards him, as he rose from stooping over the earth. He was coming out of the near distance. She set down her sheaves to make a new stook. They were unsure. Her hands fluttered. Yet she broke away, and turned to the moon, which laid bare her bosom, so she felt as if her bosom were heaving and panting with moonlight. And he had to put up her two sheaves, ...
— The Rainbow • D. H. (David Herbert) Lawrence

... articulated cane, which holds a conspicuous rank in the tropics from its rapid growth and almost universal properties:—the succulent buds are eaten fresh and the young stems make excellent preserves. The large stems are useful in agricultural and domestic implements; also in building both houses and ships; in making baskets, cages, hats, and furniture, besides sails, paper, and in various departments of the ...
— The Sailor's Word-Book • William Henry Smyth

... said the young gentleman, sitting on the slope of the bureau and stretching out his legs as props. 'I am going to make this quite my own home whenever I am off duty, as long as we stay out. And after that, when the campaign is over in the autumn, I shall come here, and live with you like your own son, and help manage your land and your farm, you know, and make ...
— The Trumpet-Major • Thomas Hardy

... into a new country to make a government survey, he is required to place on that plat every trail, road or plowed field—John Ryan, who worked in the forties was the only one we found who always followed these directions. He would survey several townships, and there would be the much-wanted road. ...
— Old Rail Fence Corners - The A. B. C's. of Minnesota History • Various

... in two days going on board the vessel he spoke of, I was ordered, under pain of having my brains blown out, to perform the duty of a lieutenant. As it would have been madness to resist, I tried to appear reconciled to my lot, though I resolved on the first opportunity to make my escape. It came sooner than ...
— The Boy who sailed with Blake • W.H.G. Kingston

... forgetting of all about him, so that when he came out of it he would cry out, asking where he was, and what had been done to him. He would forget, too, that my mother was gone, and would call her, "Mary! Mary!" so that one's heart ached to hear him; and then Abby or I must make it clear to him again, and see the dumb suffering of him, like a creature that had not the power of speech, and knew nothing but ...
— Rosin the Beau • Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards

... are!" exclaimed Forrester. "My oldest brother was in college with Huntingdon. Says he was a good fellow, a brilliant student and even then he could make a speech that would break your heart. His one vice ...
— The Enchanted Canyon • Honore Willsie Morrow

... the Platonists he turns against the objectors by asking, 'What is become of the master argument of the Socinians that the Trinity is contradictory to common sense and reason?—Yet now they would make it the invention of the principal and most celebrated philosophers, men of the ...
— The English Church in the Eighteenth Century • Charles J. Abbey and John H. Overton

... and three days later the greater portion of the expedition had entered that city. No resistance was attempted, although several batteries and intrenched camps were passed on the way. Precautions were at once taken to make the position of the troops as secure as possible in the midst of a very large and presumably hostile population. The people showed, according to the ideas of Europe, an extraordinary want of patriotic fervor, and were soon engaged, on the most amicable terms, in conducting a brisk trade with ...
— China • Demetrius Charles Boulger

... the scales Are held by some just woman, who maintains By spinning wool her household,—carefully She poises both the wool and weights, to make The balance even, that she may provide A pittance for ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... Smy—Banger, I mean; I hope I see you well? Did you have a pleasant trip? Nice weather while you were away; a little backward, maybe, but still comfortable, and likely to make things grow. Cemetery looks beautiful now. I was out there to-day to a burying. Grass is coming up charming on your lot, and I noticed a blackberry bush growing out of Mr. Smyth's grave. He was fond of 'em, I reckon. ...
— Elbow-Room - A Novel Without a Plot • Charles Heber Clark (AKA Max Adeler)

... by passing events, a few, apparently not at all: some even like a gallery and don't object to reasonable conversation; by conversations or little interruptions which would pass unheeded by a McDonnell or a Bird, or perhaps a Zukertortian would sadly disconcert a Buckle or a Morphy, make Staunton angry, and drive ...
— Chess History and Reminiscences • H. E. Bird

... and a good deal of cautioning as to secrecy, etc. It ought to bear fruit by to- morrow, or the day after, at the latest. I'm going to start next week, and I'm really going EXPLORING, too—though not exactly as they think. I came in to-day to make a business appointment for to-morrow, please. A man starting on such a hazardous journey must be prepared, you understand. I want to leave my affairs in such shape that you will know exactly what to do—in emergency. I may ...
— Oh, Money! Money! • Eleanor Hodgman Porter

... hard coin the stuff Fer 'lectioneers to spout on; The people 's ollers soft enough To make hard money out on; Dear Uncle Sam pervides fer his, An' gives a good-sized junk to all,— I don't care how hard money is, Ez long ...
— The Biglow Papers • James Russell Lowell

... predictions I now offer the world, I forbore to publish them till I had perused the several almanacks for the year we are now entered on. I find them all in the usual strain, and I beg the reader will compare their manner with mine. And here I make bold to tell the world that I lay the whole credit of my art upon the truth of these predictions; and I will be content that Partridge, and the rest of his clan, may hoot me for a cheat and impostor if I fail ...
— The Battle of the Books - and Other Short Pieces • Jonathan Swift

... station here was about to make contact with the Venus beam. We heard a muffled siren, a signal echoing from the subterranean control rooms. The current went into all these wires and towers and twenty-foot ground discs. The hissing and throbbing ...
— Wandl the Invader • Raymond King Cummings

... "You make the hair stand up on my head. That 'blighter' has followed you up and down with his machine gun all morning, and it is a mystery to me how he manages ...
— The Red Watch - With the First Canadian Division in Flanders • J. A. Currie

... Sorber, passing his plate a third time, "are fit for a king to eat, and the fishcakes ought to make any fish proud to be used up in that manner. ...
— The Corner House Girls at School • Grace Brooks Hill

... this blessed friendship should sweeten forever in Christian homes the relation of mother and child. It should make every mother a better woman and a better mother. It should make every child a truer, holier child. Every home should have its sacred friendships between parents and children. Thus something of heaven will be brought down to our dull earth; for, ...
— Personal Friendships of Jesus • J. R. Miller

... all of his bluff, demonstrative kindliness. Tom Greenfield's hearty laugh and cordial handshake had won him more votes than many a more able man has been able to secure by the most thorough acquaintance with the questions and interests with which election would make it the duty of a man to be concerned; but it must be added that no man ever used his influence more disinterestedly and honestly, or more conscientiously fulfilled the duties of his position, ...
— The Philistines • Arlo Bates

... is a thing apart; and what is strange is that their vast strength does not seem incongruous with it. To be above that proud and lovely organism, listening, apprehensive, palpitating, nervous far beyond the human, to feel one's self almost part of it by intimate contact, to yield to it, and make it yield, to draw from it into one's self some of its exultant vitality—in a word, to ride—yes, I could comprehend Diaz' fine enthusiasm for that! I could share it when he was content to let the horses amble with noiseless hoofs over the soft ways. But when he would ...
— Sacred And Profane Love • E. Arnold Bennett

... as she could make had been accomplished, she once more had nothing left to engage her save the trifling care of her goats; and when these had been attended to, she had only to review her little preparations, renew such as were of a transitory ...
— Chronicles of the Canongate • Sir Walter Scott

... Is there some man following us? Turn round, examine everywhere and keep a good look-out; be on your guard against every trick, for they might spy on us from behind. Let us make as much noise as possible as we tramp. It would be a disgrace for all of us if we allowed ourselves to be caught in this deed by the men. Come, wrap yourselves up well, and search both right and left, so that no mischance may happen to us. Let us hasten our steps; ...
— The Eleven Comedies - Vol. I • Aristophanes et al

... store" in Baltimore followed the time-honored custom of advertising in the Maryland Gazette a fresh supply of medicines newly at hand from England. To this intelligence was added a warning. Since nonimportation agreements by colonial merchants were imminent, which bade fair to make goods hard to get, customers would be wise to make their purchases before the supply became exhausted. Boyd's prediction was sound. The Boston Tea Party of the previous December had evoked from Parliament a handful of repressive measures, the Intolerable Acts, and ...
— Old English Patent Medicines in America • George B. Griffenhagen

... Mr. Percival Waldron, a naturalist of some popular repute, is announced to lecture at eight-thirty at the Zoological Institute's Hall upon 'The Record of the Ages.' I have been specially invited to be present upon the platform, and to move a vote of thanks to the lecturer. While doing so, I shall make it my business, with infinite tact and delicacy, to throw out a few remarks which may arouse the interest of the audience and cause some of them to desire to go more deeply into the matter. Nothing contentious, ...
— The Lost World • Arthur Conan Doyle

... do you suppose I can take in all this?" interrupted the merchant. "It's nothing to me, sir. The South is competent to make her own laws." ...
— A Romance of the Republic • Lydia Maria Francis Child

... disposition of the male is expressed in the system of exogamy so characteristic of tribal life. The movement toward exogamy doubtless originates in the restlessness of the male, the tendency to make new co-ordinations, the stimulus to seek more unfamiliar women, and the emotional interest in making unfamiliar sexual alliances. But, quite aside from its origin, exogamy is an energetic expression of the male nature. Natural selection ...
— Sex and Society • William I. Thomas

... invaluable service, and great was their zeal in so doing. While the regular chaplains who came with the troops as a rule went with the troops, these fixtures in the great King's service were able not only to make arrangements for religious worship, but for almost every imaginable kind of ministry for the welfare of the men. They were often the Army Chaplain's right hand and in some cases his left hand too. It would be a grievous ...
— With the Guards' Brigade from Bloemfontein to Koomati Poort and Back • Edward P. Lowry

... Parliament must be first asked and obtained. The boy-husband went whining to his mother, while Jane sent for Arundel and Pembroke, and told them that it was not for her to appoint kings. She would make her husband a duke if he desired it; that was within her prerogative; but king she would not make him. As she was speaking, the Duchess of Northumberland rushed in with her son, fresh from the agitation of Mary's letter. The mother stormed; Guilford ...
— The Reign of Mary Tudor • James Anthony Froude

... of something sometimes," said Fritz, in his matter-of-fact way; and the two then proceeded to carry out the plan of the elder brother, which simplified their labour immensely. They only had to make some three journeys across the plateau with the skins, which, when the bundles were all transported to the eastern side of the tableland, were incontinently tumbled over to the foot of the cliff below, alighting quite close to the cauldron in which the blubber ...
— Fritz and Eric - The Brother Crusoes • John Conroy Hutcheson

... his lost Mohunes to hunt for treasure. So, though he saw nothing, he turned tail and never stopped running till he stood at the inn door. Then, forthwith, Elzevir leaves Sam to drink at the Why Not? alone, and himself sets off running up the street to call for Master Ratsey; and they two make straight across the sea-meadows in ...
— Moonfleet • J. Meade Falkner

... he goes to pay a visit to the great Caliph, horsemen, Gentiles as well as Jews, escort him, and heralds proclaim in advance, "Make way before our Lord, the son of David, as is due unto him," the Arabic words being "Amilu tarik la Saidna ben Daud." He is mounted on a horse, and is attired in robes of silk and embroidery with a large turban on his head, and from the turban is suspended a long white cloth adorned ...
— The Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela • Benjamin of Tudela

... these dream-pedlars surely should have perceived that the game was up. They had always known that only by devoting its first half to the accumulation of wealth and culture could the twentieth century hope in its second to make good some part of its utopic vision. Wealth was the first and absolute necessity: Socialism without money is a nightmare. To live well man must be able to buy some leisure, finery, and elbow-room. Anything is better than a poverty-stricken ...
— Pot-Boilers • Clive Bell

... sumptuary laws, but if they are not enough I will make more; at least they shall be numerous, if they are not good. By the horn of Beelzebub, six pages, M. de Bussy, ...
— Chicot the Jester - [An abridged translation of "La dame de Monsoreau"] • Alexandre Dumas

... of the 500 men of the rear guard, who, it is pretended, saw them die! I make no doubt that the story of the poisoning was the invention of Den——. He was a babbler, who understood a story badly, and repeated it worse. I do not think it would have been a crime to have given opium to the infected. On the contrary, it would have been obedience ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... due to an estimated 11% contraction in exports, but a substantial fiscal stimulus package mitigated the worst of the recession and the economy rebounded in 2002. Healthy foreign exchange reserves and relatively small external debt make it unlikely that Malaysia will experience a crisis similar to the one in 1997, but the economy remains vulnerable to a more protracted slowdown in Japan and the US, top export destinations and key sources ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... of matter which these rays penetrate with ease is human flesh. That a new photography has suddenly arisen which can photograph the bones, and, before long, the organs of the human body; that a light has been found which can penetrate, so as to make a photographic record, through everything from a purse or a pocket to the walls of a room or a house, is news which cannot fail to startle everybody. That the eye of the physician or surgeon, long ...
— Little Masterpieces of Science: - Invention and Discovery • Various

... the steeps of Arthur's Seat, and, accompanied by James Starr and Jack Ryan, they reached Lambert's Hotel. There a good breakfast restored their strength, and they began to make further plans for an excursion to ...
— The Underground City • Jules Verne

... For suddenly she could not smile. She was filled with the perception that if Geoffrey Cliffe did not now ask her to marry him, life would utterly lose its savor, its carefully cherished and augmented savor, and youth would abandon her. At the same time she realized that she would have to make a fight of it, with every ...
— The Marriage of William Ashe • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... see anyone on Sunday, I am resolved to set an example of a proper observance of the Sabbath ... I will try to make it what I believe it was intended to be—a day of rest."—Townsend Harris's Diary, ...
— The Religions of Japan - From the Dawn of History to the Era of Meiji • William Elliot Griffis

... the rings they had reft erewhile, hardy heroes, from hoard in cave, — trusting the ground with treasure of earls, gold in the earth, where ever it lies useless to men as of yore it was. Then about that barrow the battle-keen rode, atheling-born, a band of twelve, lament to make, to mourn their king, chant their dirge, and their chieftain honor. They praised his earlship, his acts of prowess worthily witnessed: and well it is that men their master-friend mightily laud, heartily love, when hence he goes from life in ...
— Beowulf • Anonymous

... there, then, no other ways of knowledge than by the senses? Ah, ignorant child! was not my Spirit with thee when the lion sprang upon thy companion? Did I not pray Those set about thee to protect thee, to make sure thy thrust when thou didst drive the spear into the lion's throat! How came it that thou wentest ...
— Cleopatra • H. Rider Haggard

... was determined on an effort to make my mother acquainted with Miss Montenero. If I could but effect a meeting, a great point I thought would be gained. Mowbray undertook to manage it, and he, as usual, succeeded. He persuaded his mother to go to an auction of pictures, where he assured her she would be likely to meet with a Vandyke ...
— Tales & Novels, Vol. IX - [Contents: Harrington; Thoughts on Bores; Ormond] • Maria Edgeworth

... Baker Street in a cab, "but I have never for a moment felt that they were glad to have us." "But how could they have been glad to have us," she added afterwards, "when we brought such trouble with us?" But they to whom they were going now would receive her with joy;—would make her welcome with all her load of sorrows, would give to her a sympathy which it was impossible that she should receive from others. Though she might not be happy now,—for in truth how could she be ever really happy again,—there would be a joy to her in placing her child in her mother's ...
— He Knew He Was Right • Anthony Trollope

... thing). {ITS} fans, on the other hand, say it was coined years earlier in opposition to the incredibly paranoid {Multics} people down the hall, for whom security was everything. In the ITS culture it referred to (1) the fact that that by the time a tourist figured out how to make trouble he'd generally gotten over the urge to make it, because he felt part of the community; and (2) (self-mockingly) the poor coverage of the documentation and obscurity of many commands. One instance of *deliberate* security through obscurity is recorded; the command ...
— THE JARGON FILE, VERSION 2.9.10

... gone, Sary ran to make sure the door was securely closed. Then she turned to inspect the belongings of the room. "Huh! the press ain't so much—plain ...
— Polly of Pebbly Pit • Lillian Elizabeth Roy

... my manner and habit very strange indeed regarding the Truth of Spirit control There has been many things practiced which I see now was wrong and foolish yet the Truth stills exist that we can come back and make ourselves felt you ask if I am pleased with what Thomas [probably Thomas R. Hazard, who was with us at the time] is doing I am in many respects though there are things best left undone and unsaid You are perfectly aware ...
— Preliminary Report of the Commission Appointed by the University • The Seybert Commission

... the Virgin for the Church of Santa Maria Novella, where it is suspended on high between the chapel of the Rucellai family and that of the Bardi. This picture is of larger size than any figure that had been painted down to those times, and the angels surrounding it make it evident that although Cimabue still retained the Greek manner, he was nevertheless gradually approaching the mode of outline and general method of modern times. Thus it happened that this work was an object ...
— Six Centuries of Painting • Randall Davies

... against God's wish that they make their feeble effort to cultivate the plains, those poor pioneer people, that He must send a scourge of ...
— The Way of the Wind • Zoe Anderson Norris

... make out what the man was doing. Most of the travellers I see from my field are like the people I commonly meet—so intent upon their destination that they take no joy of the road they travel. They do not even see me here in the fields; and if they did, they would probably think me a slow ...
— Adventures In Friendship • David Grayson

... stopped to listen. This the teacher felt would not do, and besides this, he had met the parson, and "argyed" with him once, and it was the popular verdict that he had not come out ahead in the encounter. All of which tended to make him bear down on "Dodd," till finally he resolved that he would have a row with the boy and that it should be ...
— The Evolution of Dodd • William Hawley Smith

... the situation is this: if we make a move at all, we may do something of which he does not approve. Haven't you noticed that whenever I suggest anything, or whenever you suggest anything, for that matter, he always has something counter to it? And I don't like ...
— A Woman Intervenes • Robert Barr

... gasped Burke. "The atmospheric valve is set for five thousand. I'll make it ten! It will give us more room to recover in—if ...
— The Man Who Rocked the Earth • Arthur Train

... he cried. "Who is there in Germany could make such toys as I and my factory people? The world would be sad indeed—the world of children, I mean—if my factory were to close down or my designers should lose ...
— The Mischief Maker • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... and an infidel. The latter had sued the former for a heavy sum, falsely alleging his promise to pay it for some stocks which he claimed to have sold him. The Christian admitted AN OFFER of the stock, but protested that so far from promising the sum demanded, he had steadily refused to make any trade whatever with the plaintiff. Each of the parties to the suit had a friend who fully corroborated their assertions. Thus the case went before the jury ...
— The Wonders of Prayer - A Record of Well Authenticated and Wonderful Answers to Prayer • Various

... gentleman, with a wig—considered that this was of service to me. I know it frightened me heartily, and prepared me for a visit from Master Frank, which I endured with a tameness he would not have experienced, had the usual current of blood flowed in my veins. But sickness and the lancet make one very tolerant of sermonizing.—At last, in consideration of being relieved from his accursed presence, and the sound of his infernally calm voice, I slowly and reluctantly acquiesced in an arrangement, ...
— St. Ronan's Well • Sir Walter Scott

... In a word, make no attempt to seek support from his judgment, or by convincing his reason, in important cases, where his feelings or wishes are involved, but in all such cases rest your decisions solely upon your own authority. But then, on the other hand, in unimportant ...
— Gentle Measures in the Management and Training of the Young • Jacob Abbott

... indigenous inhabitants; approximately 40 people make up the staff of US Fish and Wildlife Service and their services cooperator living at the atoll ...
— The 2002 CIA World Factbook • US Government

... detected in the slightly improved breeds of the S. scrofa type.[160] Nathusius states positively (s. 99, 103), as the result of common experience and of his experiments, that rich and abundant food, given during youth, tends by some direct action to make the head broader and shorter; and that poor food works a contrary result. He lays much stress on the fact that all wild and semi-domesticated pigs, in ploughing up the ground with their muzzles, have; whilst young, to exert ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I. • Charles Darwin

... before them all, and thus addresses him: "My beloved son, you are my only heir. I am looking forward to the grave, but you are just entering upon life. Before I make over my sceptre to you, tell me, in the presence of this assembly, what you have been taught, and in what manner you propose ...
— The Talking Beasts • Various

... her kennel, the mastiff old 145 Lay fast asleep, in moonshine cold. The mastiff old did not awake, Yet she an angry moan did make! And what can ail the mastiff bitch? Never till now she uttered yell 150 Beneath the eye of Christabel. Perhaps it is the owlet's scritch: For what can ail the ...
— Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Select Poems • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... Iduna hurriedly. "The truth is that Steinar is jealous of me. How is it that you can make us all love you ...
— The Wanderer's Necklace • H. Rider Haggard

... to Boston, there, for a season, to make "the wicked walk on every side, and the vilest to be exalted." Then came that famous April day of 1689; and, following, event after event, one storming upon another's heels, as the people rose from their long bondage, ...
— The History of the United States from 1492 to 1910, Volume 1 • Julian Hawthorne

... also, I was shut out—I who had carried potatoes to George's door while he was off learning to follow the hounds. His immaculate, yet careless, dress; the perfection of his manner, which seemed to make him a part of the surroundings in which he stood; the very smoothness and slenderness of the hand that rested on Sally's chair—all these produced in me a curious and unreasonable ...
— The Romance of a Plain Man • Ellen Glasgow

... organic matter will all be driven off, except the carbon, which not being supplied with oxygen cannot escape. In this form bones are called ivory black, or bone-black. It consists of the inorganic matter, and the carbon of the bones. The nitrogen having been expelled it can make no ammonia, and thus far the original value of bones is reduced by burning; that is, one ton of bones contains more fertilizing matter before, than after burning; but one ton of bone black is more valuable ...
— The Elements of Agriculture - A Book for Young Farmers, with Questions Prepared for the Use of Schools • George E. Waring

... enemy's strength. The insurgents, finding they were not followed up (the rainy season was commencing), were beginning to take the offensive with greater boldness, attacking the Americans in the rear. The War Department, however, hesitated to make the levy owing to the friction which existed between the volunteers and the regulars, but the case was so urgent that at the end of June it was decided to raise the total forces in the ...
— The Philippine Islands • John Foreman

... pleasant air. There was one rather notable person in London, of the highly respectable sort, though, decidedly among the free opinionists, whose acquaintance Milton did make about this time, if he had not made it before, and who must be specially introduced to the reader. This was ...
— The Life of John Milton Vol. 3 1643-1649 • David Masson

... in the evening, one is struck by the enormous number of women workers who now find employment in this great city—in some offices hundreds of women, forming almost the entire staff, are employed. Their competition must make it harder still for the male clerks. Independent, self-reliant, business-like, a curious type is being developed of these bread-earners—a type that suggests the evolution of a neutral sex. Perhaps it is not altogether to be wondered at, and is only a manifestation of the ...
— Impressions of a War Correspondent • George Lynch

... fact just such a world as would be formed if a sufficient quantity of water in the same condition as the water of our seas were placed at Jupiter's greater distance from the sun, around a nucleus of earthy or cindery matter large enough to make the density of the entire planet thus formed equal to that of Jupiter, or about one-third greater than the density of water. In this argument there are in reality two assumptions, of precisely the same nature as those which Whewell ...
— Myths and Marvels of Astronomy • Richard A. Proctor

... discovered a field within a day's journey that nobody else knows of—that nobody else is likely to know of. You and I go there, we work it for a few months, and the gold I have mentioned is to be represented as the result of our labours if it becomes necessary to make explanations. A few thousand ounces in nuggets which might 'by some unhappy chance be recognised by previous owners we shall batter into slugs and reserve ...
— In the Roaring Fifties • Edward Dyson

... you knew this Doctor Warren, colonel," he was saying, "and up to this time I had not spoken of him for reasons which—well, because he had reasons for asking me to make no mention of his being here. Now, if he was a Doctor Warren, from the North, and a loyal man, what would he be doing with ...
— A War-Time Wooing - A Story • Charles King

... The latter was two days old. I wrote to express my sorrow, and excuse my apparent neglect, and having made a long journey to see her also laid in the earth, I returned to my old home, in order to make fresh arrangements. ...
— Wilfrid Cumbermede • George MacDonald

... service, however great, that others were not ready to fill the place and do as well. The Navy is full of heroes unknown to fame. Its great merit is the professional spirit which runs through it; the high sense of duty, the lofty standards of service to which its hearts are loyal and which make them all equal ...
— Modern Eloquence: Vol II, After-Dinner Speeches E-O • Various

... be as good as a hundred there," he explained. "Pick them off as they rush through. Aim carefully and make every shot count." ...
— The Boy Allies At Verdun • Clair W. Hayes

... however, which would add to your beauty. I do know, however, something which would add to your happiness. I have found your ring, slain your enemy, brought you the secret of youth and health; now will you not come with me to my King, who loves you so much that he will make you the ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... Mrs. Ogren and her husband would have endured the agony of long-continued hunger, but they could not see their little baby starve. For some time he was fed on cold water and raw rice, but when their small stock of the latter ran out, they tramped back to make another appeal to the people who had so recently refused to help them. Their reception was even worse than on the previous occasion. One of the men had heard of the Boxers' offer of Tls. 100 for the head of every foreigner brought to them, and was anxious to earn ...
— Noble Deeds of the World's Heroines • Henry Charles Moore

... house for a man and does not make its construction firm and the house, which he has built, collapses and causes the death of the owner of the house, that builder ...
— The Witchcraft Delusion In Colonial Connecticut (1647-1697) • John M. Taylor

... hoops with a netting, the total length of which was about twenty-five feet. They also faced each hoop with a netting, leaving an aperture large enough for the ducts to enter. It was long and tedious work to make the netting, as this was done by cutting the hide of an elk and the hide of a mule deer into strips and plaiting the strips on the hoops. They then had a network tunnel, at the smaller end of which they constructed an inclosure five or six feet square by means of stout poles which they thrust ...
— The Last of the Chiefs - A Story of the Great Sioux War • Joseph Altsheler

... Wilberforce has a local Boy's Scout Club conducted under the auspices of the Young Men's Christian Association. Howard University, Fisk University and Morehouse College conduct boys clubs and some of the men find excellent opportunity for service. The following make visits to prisons and render the inmates service: Knoxville College, Benedict College, Virginia Union University, Atlanta University, ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 5, 1920 • Various

... significations which time or fashion gradually confer upon old words very unreadily. I could see, at first, that they were puzzled by my use of the word "awful," now long adopted generally to strengthen a statement, very much as they themselves make use of "terrible," "desp'rate," or "de-adly." They connect the word "friend" with the signification "benefactor" only; a man, speaking of someone born with a little inherited fortune, said that "his friends lived before him." I told an old labourer that my little daughter considered him a ...
— Grain and Chaff from an English Manor • Arthur H. Savory

... The things that make a life to please, (Sweetest Martial), they are these: Estate inherited, not got: A thankful field, hearth always hot: City seldom, law-suits never: Equal friends, agreeing forever: Health of body, peace of mind: Sleeps that till the morning ...
— A Handbook for Latin Clubs • Various

... Majesty, "that settles that. We have a whole night ahead of us, Sir Kenneth. What do you say we make ...
— That Sweet Little Old Lady • Gordon Randall Garrett (AKA Mark Phillips)

... "Devonian and Cornwall branch of the Turolds," and contained notes of Robert Turold's ancestral discoveries in that spot. The notes were not finished, but ended abruptly in the middle of a sentence: "It is necessary to make it clea—" ...
— The Moon Rock • Arthur J. Rees

... slip 1, make 1, knit 2 together, inserting the needle into the back part of the stitch, slip 1, ...
— Beeton's Book of Needlework • Isabella Beeton

... each division shall choose out of their own tribe twelve guards, who are to be between twenty-five and thirty years of age. Both the wardens and the guards are to serve two years; and they shall make a round of the divisions, staying a month in each. They shall go from West to East during the first year, and back from East to West during the second. Thus they will gain a perfect knowledge of the country at ...
— Laws • Plato

... may be examined by anyone desirous of doing so. When this part of the performance is finished, the medium and his sitter then join or clasp their right hands (as in handshaking), and the sitter is instructed not to release the hand for a single instant. To "make assurance doubly sure," however, the hands are fastened together in any way the sitters may desire; the hands being tied together with tape, e. g., and the ends of this tape tied and the knots sealed. The tape connects ...
— The Lock and Key Library/Real Life #2 • Julian Hawthorne

... by a roar, a human roar, a roar such as only a Hollander can make when a Hollander is honestly angry. As I rose from the domain of the subconscious, the idea that the roar belonged to Bill The Hollander became conviction. Bill The Hollander, alias America Lakes, slept next to The Young Pole (by ...
— The Enormous Room • Edward Estlin Cummings

... alternately talked, sung, and dismounted from his horse to speak to every peasant girl who met us on the road; he seemed at home with every one, and made the time pass agreeably enough. He sung, at my request, the Marseillois, and sung it with such emphasis, energy, and attitude, as to make me sincerely repent the having called forth such a deafening exhibition of his powers. Though one or two travellers passed us whilst he was thus exhibiting, my gentleman was not in the slightest degree discomposed, but continued his song, his attitudes, ...
— Travels through the South of France and the Interior of Provinces of Provence and Languedoc in the Years 1807 and 1808 • Lt-Col. Pinkney

... man! A perfect picter! Give him my fond love, Fuzzy, and say that I am desolated not to be able to stay to make his acquaintance, but I must make a ...
— Tom and Some Other Girls - A Public School Story • Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey

... displayed another fog, the men of the regiment exchanged eloquent comments; but they did not abuse it at length, because the streets of the town now contained enough galloping aides to make three troops of cavalry, and they knew that they had come to the verge of ...
— The Little Regiment - And Other Episodes of the American Civil War • Stephen Crane

... most persons is very unpleasant. Then take them out, wipe them, and season them, with pepper only. Beat some yolk of egg; and in another dish grate a sufficiency of bread-crumbs. Have ready in a frying-pan some lard and batter mixed, and make it boil. Then dip each slice of egg plant first in the egg, and then in the crumbs, till both sides are well covered; and fry them brown, taking care to have them done all through, as the least rawness renders ...
— Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches • Eliza Leslie

... the root of the difference. In a climate that keeps the pulses in full leap and the nerves tense, we call upon pride to lash on the quivering body and spirit to run the unrighteous race, the goal of which is to seem richer than we are, and make "smartness" (American smartness) cover the want of capital. Having created false standards of respectability, we crowd insane asylums and cemeteries in trying to live up ...
— The Secret of a Happy Home (1896) • Marion Harland

... busy, and it seems a queer side of war to cook and race around and make doctors as comfortable as possible. We have a capital staff, who are made up of zeal and muscle. I do not know how long it can last. We breakfast at 7.30, which means that most of the orderlies are ...
— My War Experiences in Two Continents • Sarah Macnaughtan

... Army. Lord Rotherwood was spending already as much as he could afford, in the days of agricultural depression, on the improvements planned with Mr. White. That individual was too good a man of business to fall, as he said, into the trap, and make a present to that scamp Richard of more than the worth of the houses, and only Mr. Flight was ready to go to any cost to keep off the Salvation Army; but the answer was curt. Richard knew he had no chance with ...
— Beechcroft at Rockstone • Charlotte M. Yonge

... priest's decision, and immediately made preparations for the ceremony. The altar was reared. The victim was adorned for the sacrifice, and the garlands, according to the accustomed usage, were bound upon his temples. He contrived, however, he said, at the last moment, to make his escape. He broke the bands with which he had been bound, and fled into a morass near the shore, where he remained concealed in inaccessible thickets until the Greeks had sailed away. He then came forth and was at length seized and bound by the shepherds ...
— Romulus, Makers of History • Jacob Abbott

... termination of the bank and of the second range of cliffs the coast became sandy, and trended north-eastward about three leagues; after which it turned south-east-by-east, and formed the head of the Great Australian Bight, whose latitude I make to be 31 deg. 29' south, and longitude 131 deg. 10' east. In the chart of admiral D'Entrecasteaux the head of the Great Bight is placed in 31 deg. 36' and 131 deg. 27'; but I think there is an error at least in the ...
— A Voyage to Terra Australis • Matthew Flinders

... within their quarters till they should receive orders to attack. He remained himself at the head of the infantry, in another part of the inclosed court, having issued the strictest commands that no one should make the smallest motion without his orders, which were to be conveyed by the discharge ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. IV. • Robert Kerr

... the gloom of night, at a given moment, and without a sound that could alarm the enemy. Wolfe withdrew his force from the Montmorenci, embarked them on board his ships, and made every sign of departure. Montcalm mistrusted these signs, and suspected Wolfe would make at least one more leap on Quebec before withdrawing. Yet he did not in the least suspect Wolfe's real designs. He discussed, in fact, the very plan Wolfe adopted, but dismissed it by saying, "We need not suppose that the enemy have ...
— Deeds that Won the Empire - Historic Battle Scenes • W. H. Fitchett

... sufficient stress on accented syllables. She says for example, "pro-vo-ca-tion," "in-di-vi-du-al," with ever so little difference between the value of syllables, and a good deal of inconsistency in the pronunciation of the same word one day and the next. It would, I think, be hard to make her feel just how to pronounce DICTIONARY without her erring either toward DICTIONAYRY or DICTION'RY, and, of course the word is neither one nor the other. For no system of marks in a lexicon can tell ...
— Story of My Life • Helen Keller

... of that lake we find an elevated district with several small lakes and streams flowing through valleys. This is the water-shed also of two systems. The streams to the east, flowing into Lake Superior, ultimately enter the Saint Lawrence; while those to the west make their way into Lake Winnipeg, the waters of which, after flowing through a variety of channels, fall into Hudson Bay. To the west of this water-shed range the first lake we meet with is known as the Lac des Milles Lacs. Two rivers flow from it, expanding here and there into ...
— The Western World - Picturesque Sketches of Nature and Natural History in North - and South America • W.H.G. Kingston

... she preferred staying with her relatives in Glasgow. It was not exactly my ideal of married life, but as the couple always seemed happy enough when together, and the arrangement appeared to suit them both, it was not my place to make any comment. ...
— To Mars via The Moon - An Astronomical Story • Mark Wicks

... crimes, deserving the most cruel chastisement which human beings could inflict. The first small vestige of a feeling of obligation in a superior to acknowledge any right in inferiors, began when he had been induced, for convenience, to make some promise to them. Though these promises, even when sanctioned by the most solemn oaths, were for many ages revoked or violated on the most trifling provocation or temptation, it is probable that this, except by persons of ...
— The Subjection of Women • John Stuart Mill

... from Vermont rose from his seat and looked at me across the schoolroom. I thought he was going to say something. He took down his hat, went to the door, turned and looked at me again, but he did not speak or make any sign. Next morning his place was vacant, and I asked one of the boys if he had seen the young ...
— The Book of the Bush • George Dunderdale



Words linked to "Make" :   have sex, become, preserve, prefabricate, sort, jostle, perform, rack up, guess, add, come, give rise, represent, feign, number, set up, kick up, get at, obligate, puncture, actuate, estimate, claw, create mentally, summit, straighten, wreak, behave, cooper, pay, square away, slap together, publish, tack, perpetrate, bring about, pioneer, put on, actualise, multiply, flambe, ensure, rake off, pulsate, distil, facilitate, lard, turn a profit, prompt, profit, recreate, exaggerate, guarantee, add up, let, mold, force, clean up, lock, peak, elicit, deglaze, dry-wall, froth, consider, elaborate, instigate, sleep with, cut, raise, customize, sham, bed, approximate, comprise, total, beat, change, come through, achieve, cards, turn in, have a go at it, enkindle, institute, refashion, drive, whomp up, judge, extract, scale, roll in the hay, leave, arouse, occasion, incite, whip up, regulate, dummy, have it away, break, travel, dung, put together, bring, track, churn out, stir, determine, encourage, tally, solicit, amount, propel, motivate, bonk, mark, locomote, offset, originate, dissemble, conjure up, initiate, beget, insure, culminate, develop, return, compel, access, hump, keep, eliminate, reordering, neaten, twine, write, get laid, squeeze out, inspire, go, execute, go through, set, channelize, have intercourse, effectuate, have it off, modify, acquire, create by mental act, effect, smelt, underproduce, devil, top out, net, revet, stale, machine, dress, bear, derive, pull, breed, precook, organise, move, bootleg, overproduce, cook up, take home, fabricate, catch up, rebuild, sleep together, assemble, unmake, find, create from raw material, copy, alter, sack, bring up, create verbally, erect, short-circuit, secure, straighten out, frame up, manufacture, spawn, oblige, get together, suborn, scrape, shape, provoke, piece, generate, groin, bottom out, appear, accomplish, burn, put up, incorporate, press, put forward, jazz, call forth, short, rake in, shovel in, gross, variety, channelise, kindle, regard, substantiate, escallop, reproduce, fuck, affect, design, extrude, arithmetic, egest, lead, card game, decide, preassemble, impel, call down, pulse, forge, gauge, head, output, rear, laminate, riffle, eff, yield, compose, spume, play, seem, turn out, print, evoke, reckon, put out, cantilever, invoke, bushwhack, surmount, wattle, strike, dress out, know, direct, overdo, excrete, be, gather, chop, bring home, suds, assure, actualize, blast, corduroy, shell, act, mother, go through the motions, reshuffle, conjure, render, create from raw stuff, see, educe, wet, redo, fashion, fire, screw, regenerate, making, make unnecessary, sack up, persuade, grow, clap up, frame, throw together, pass, procreate, tidy, film, cleave, father, look, commit, top, sire, be intimate, start, clap together, view, kind, concoct, reconstruct, chelate, confect, breast, ground, do it, get through, go across, scallop, compile, tack together, organize, rename, tidy up, get it on, grind, bang, reshuffling, engender, influence, bring forth, lie with, distill, style, love, dummy up, choreograph, run aground, charge, eke out, re-create, customise, appoint, fudge together, proof



Copyright © 2022 Dictionary One.com