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Lea   /li/   Listen
Lea

noun
1.
A unit of length of thread or yarn.
2.
A field covered with grass or herbage and suitable for grazing by livestock.  Synonyms: grazing land, ley, pasture, pastureland.






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"Lea" Quotes from Famous Books



... and abominable orgies. The early Christians were accused of such rites, and they charged dissenting sects with the same.[461] The Manichaeans, Waldenses, Huguenots, Puritans, Luciferans, Brothers of the Free Spirit, and so on through the whole list of heretical sects, have been so charged. Lea, in his History of the Inquisition, mentions over a dozen cases of such charges, some of which were true. Nowadays the same assertions are made against freemasons by Roman Catholics.[462] Jews are believed ...
— Folkways - A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals • William Graham Sumner

... feast. Later, there was shooting, and Robin Hood, having once missed the mark, applied to the King, whom he did not recognize, for a punishment. Thereupon King Richard arose, rolled up his sleeve, and gave such a blow as Robin had never felt before. It was afterwards that Sir Richard of the Lea appeared upon the scene, and disclosed the identity of the powerful stranger. Then Robin Hood, Little John, Will Scarlet, and Alan-a-Dale followed the King to London at the royal wish, and left Sherwood for many ...
— John and Betty's History Visit • Margaret Williamson

... Pow'r the giftie gie us To see oursels as ithers see us! It wad frae monie a blunder free us, And foolish notion; What airs in dress an' gait wad lea'e us, ...
— Life and Literature - Over two thousand extracts from ancient and modern writers, - and classified in alphabetical order • J. Purver Richardson

... Lea, in his History of Confession and Indulgences, ii, p. 87, quotes Zanchini, Tract. de Haeret., cap. 33, to the effect that goods of a heretic were confiscated and disabilities inflicted on two generations ...
— A Short History of Women's Rights • Eugene A. Hecker

... falls the heavy shower That drenches deep the furrow'd lea; Nor do continual tempests pour On the vex'd [2]Caspian's billowy sea; Nor yet the ice, in silent horror, stands Thro' all the passing months ...
— Original sonnets on various subjects; and odes paraphrased from Horace • Anna Seward

... gate, and looked into an empty field where no sheep were feeding, where the short grass was nipped and blanched. It was a very grey day; a most opaque sky, "onding on snaw," canopied all; thence flakes felt it intervals, which settled on the hard path and on the hoary lea without melting. I stood, a wretched child enough, whispering to myself over and over again, "What shall I do?—what shall ...
— Jane Eyre - an Autobiography • Charlotte Bronte

... raised her head and fixed upon Parsifal her prayerful wet eyes. Either from his recent contemplation of the flowery lea, or some occult association of her personality with the past, the flowers of Klingsor's garden come into his mind. "I saw them wither who had smiled on me. May they not also be hungering for redemption now?... Your tears, too, are turned to blessed dew.... You weep, and see, the ...
— The Wagnerian Romances • Gertrude Hall

... on the grey walls there confronting dawn, on the low green lea, Lone and sweet as for fairies' feet held sacred, silent and strange and free, Wild and wet with its rills; but yet more fair falls ...
— Highways & Byways in Sussex • E.V. Lucas

... river, till the land became little peopled, and the sixth day they rode the wild-wood ways, where was no folk, save now and again the little cot of some forester or collier; but the seventh day, about noon, they came into a clearing of the wood, a rugged little plain of lea-land, mingled with marish, with a little deal of acre-land in barley and rye, round about a score of poor frame-houses set down scattermeal about the lea. But on a long ridge, at the northern end of the said plain, was a grey castle, strong, and with big and high towers, yet not so much greater ...
— Child Christopher • William Morris

... to close, and Mr. Polly stopped him neatly, as it were a miracle, with the head of the broom across his chest. Uncle Jim seized the broom with both hands. "Lea-go!" he said, and tugged. Mr. Polly shook his head, tugged, and showed pale, compressed lips. Both tugged. Then Uncle Jim tried to get round the end of the broom; Mr. Polly circled away. They began to circle about one another, both tugging hard, both intensely watchful ...
— The History of Mr. Polly • H. G. Wells

... of the seventeenth century, in an English country district, two lads romped on the same lea and chased the same butterflies. One was a little brown-eyed boy, with red cheeks, fine round form, and fiery temper. The other was a gentle child, tall, lithe, and blonde. The one was the son of a man ...
— The Bay State Monthly, Volume 3, No. 4 • Various

... the King's companies keep these prizes, the winning companies shall have, first, two tuns of Rhenish wine; second, two tuns of English beer; and, third, five of the fattest harts that run on Dallom Lea. Methinks that is a princely ...
— Robin Hood • J. Walker McSpadden

... softly flow, by lawn and lea, A rivulet then a river: Nowhere by thee my steps shall be, ...
— Beauties of Tennyson • Alfred Tennyson

... fingers touch the harp Wafting sweet music o'er the lea, It is for thee thus swells her heart, Sighing ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... than the first green leaf With which the fearful springtide flecks the lea, Weep not, Almeida, that I said to thee That thou hast half my heart, for bitter grief Doth hold the other half in sovranty. Thou art my heart's sun in love's crystalline: Yet on both sides at once ...
— The Suppressed Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Alfred Lord Tennyson

... that Biffy Lea, one of Princeton's greatest tackles, was slowly but surely making a wonderful tackle out of Doc Hillebrand. Bert Wheeler was making rapid strides to attain the position of halfback. They were the only two freshmen who made the team that ...
— Football Days - Memories of the Game and of the Men behind the Ball • William H. Edwards

... greatest and - shears at C will be w x AGC and -w x CHB. But if the load is distributed to the bracing intersections by rail and cross girders, then the shear at C' will be greatest when the load extends to N, and will have the values w x ADN and -w x NEB. An interesting paper by F.C. Lea, dealing with the determination of stress due to concentrated loads, by the method of influence lines will be found in Proc. ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 - "Brescia" to "Bulgaria" • Various

... wind on the Thames blew icy breath, The wind on the Seine blew fiery death, The snow lay thick on tower and tree, The streams ran black through wold and lea; As I sat alone in London town And dreamed a dream of ...
— Winning a Cause - World War Stories • John Gilbert Thompson and Inez Bigwood

... "Ut lea, quam saevo foetam pressere cubili Venantes Numidae, natos erecta superstat Mente sub incerta, torvum ac miserabile frendens Illa quidem turbare globes, et frangere morsu Tela queat; sed prolis amor crudelia vincit Pectora, et in ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 • Leigh Hunt

... ill is a maid. For when my loathing it of heat deprives me, I know not whither my mind's whirlwind drives me. Even as a headstrong courser bears away His rider, vainly striving him to stay; 30 Or as a sudden gale thrusts into sea The haven-touching bark, now near the lea; So wavering Cupid brings me back amain, And purple Love resumes his darts again. Strike, boy, I offer thee my naked breast, Here thou hast strength, here thy right hand doth rest. Here of themselves thy shafts come, as if shot; ...
— The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Christopher Marlowe

... the Queen had task'd Our skill to-day amidst the silver Lea, Whereon the noontide sun had not yet bask'd, Wherefore some patient man we thought to see, Planted in moss-grown rushes to the knee, Beside the cloudy margin cold and dim;— Howbeit no patient fisherman was he That cast his sudden shadow from the brim, ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... for thee, as I hae been, We should hae been gallopin' doun in yon green, And linkin' it owre the lily-white lea— And wow gin I were but ...
— Shining Ferry • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... never a pathway shall ye tread, No foot of seashore, hill, or lea, But ye may think: "The dead, my dead, Gave this, a sacred ...
— More Toasts • Marion Dix Mosher

... best laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley, An' lea'e us nought but grief and ...
— Desk and Debit - or, The Catastrophes of a Clerk • Oliver Optic

... but useful Parliamentary service; Mr. Johnston, still of Ballykilbeg, but no longer a Liberal as he ranked twenty years ago; Sir John Kennaway, still towering over his leaders from a back bench above the gangway; Sir Wilfrid Lawson, increasingly wise, and not less gay than of yore; Mr. Lea, who has gone over to the enemy he faced in 1873; Sir John Lubbock, who, though no sluggard, still from time to time goes to the ants; Mr. Peter M'Lagan, who has succeeded Sir Charles Forster as Chairman of the Committee on Petitions; Sir John ...
— The Strand Magazine, Volume V, Issue 26, February 1893 - An Illustrated Monthly • Various

... depths of the fathomless sea, Go where the dew-drop shines on the lea, Go where are gathered in lands afar, The treasures of earth for the rich bazaar, Go to the crowded ball-room, where All that is lovely, and young, and fair, Charms the soul with beauty and grace, And my third shall ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, Nov 1877-Nov 1878 - No 1, Nov 1877 • Various

... stem they cannot grieve. For me,"—she stooped, and, looking round, Plucked a blue hare-bell from the ground— "For me, whose memory scarce conveys An image of more splendid days, 175 This little flower, that loves the lea, May well my simple emblem be; It drinks heaven's dew as blithe as rose That in the king's own garden grows; And when I place it in my hair, 180 Allan, a bard is bound to swear He ne'er saw coronet so fair." Then playfully the chaplet wild ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... it would need a heart of flint To watch the blithe lambs caper o'er the lea, And, watching them, refrain from thoughts of mint, Of new potatoes, and ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, September 10, 1892 • Various

... America has made to the literature of the universal church. If to these we add the names of George Park Fisher, of Yale, and Bishop Hurst, and Alexander V. G. Allen, of Cambridge, author of "The Continuity of Christian Thought," and Henry Charles Lea, of Philadelphia, we have already vindicated for American scholarship a high place in this department ...
— A History of American Christianity • Leonard Woolsey Bacon

... to live at Aldercliffe, the stately colonial mansion of Mr. Lawrence Fernald; or at Pine Lea, the home of Mr. Clarence Fernald, where sweeping lawns, bright awnings, gardens, conservatories, and flashing fountains made a wonderland of the place. Troupes of laughing guests seemed always to be going and coming at both houses and there were horses and motor-cars, tennis courts, ...
— Ted and the Telephone • Sara Ware Bassett

... a lady sweet and fair In simple dress, But right well clothed upon is she With seemliness. By her do flowers seem less bright, And she is such a glorious sight As, on May morns, the golden sun which lights up hill and lea— But froward maids delight us not, with all ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... a mountain I stand, With a crown of red gold in my hand, - Wild Moors came trooping o'er the lea, O how from their fury shall I flee, flee, flee? O how from their ...
— The Zincali - An Account of the Gypsies of Spain • George Borrow

... breaking o'er us, See, heaven hath caught its hue! We've day's long light before us, What sport shall we pursue? The hunt o'er hill and lea? The sail o'er summer sea? Oh let not hour so sweet Unwinged by pleasure fleet. The dawn is breaking o'er us, See, heaven hath caught its hue! We've days long light before us, What ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... wildest confusion. My own wife was in hysterics; Mrs Irwin, I was told by half-a-dozen tongues at once, was dying; and the frightful cause of all was, that little George Irwin, a favourite with everybody, had in some unaccountable manner fallen into the river Lea, and been drowned. This, at least, was the general conviction, although the river had been dragged to no purpose—the poor child's black beaver-hat and feather having been discovered floated to the bank, a considerable way down the stream. The body, it was thought, had been carried out into ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 434 - Volume 17, New Series, April 24, 1852 • Various

... south, the eastern, western, and northern districts of England were cut off from the centre by natural barriers. The Fens of Cambridgeshire and the marshes of the Lea valley, together with the dense forest along the "East Anglian" range, enclosed the east in a ring fence; within which yet another belt of woodland divided the Trinobantes of Essex from the Iceni of Norfolk and Suffolk. The Severn and the Dee isolated what is now Wales, ...
— Early Britain—Roman Britain • Edward Conybeare

... book. While he was examining it, Stark, a very intelligent bookseller, came in, to whom Mr. Bird at once ceded the right of pre-emption. Stark betrayed such visible anxiety that the vendor, Smith, declined setting a price. Soon after Sir C. Anderson, of Lea (author of Ancient Models), came in and took away the book to collate, but brought it back in the morning having found it imperfect in the middle, and offered L5 for it. Sir Charles had no book of reference to guide ...
— Enemies of Books • William Blades

... praised the Princess for her deed, wondering the while at her valour and stout-heartedness. They fared on lustily and ceased not so doing all that night and halted not till the day broke with its shine and sheen and the sun shone bright upon plain and height when they came to a wide riverino lea wherein the gazelles were frisking gracefully. Its surface was clothed with green and on all sides fruit trees of every kind were seen: its slopes for flowers like serpents' bellies showed, and birds sang on boughs aloud and its rills in manifold runnels ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 9 • Richard F. Burton

... Lea), politician, born at Richmond; entered the House of Commons in 1832 as a Tory, and was in turn Secretary to the Admiralty and War Secretary under Peel; during the Aberdeen ministry he, as War Secretary, ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... lo, a mighty water, a rushing flood and wide, And no ferry for the shipless; so he went along its side, As a man that seeketh somewhat: but it widened toward the sea, And the moon sank down in the west, and he went o'er a desert lea. ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... it). Oh, madam, not the lea— (Checking himself and looking at it.) You have your brother's hand. And the ...
— The Man of Destiny • George Bernard Shaw

... winna laist a day. The moment I lea' her, she'll be as ill's ever," said the youth. "She has a kin' a likin' to me, 'cause I gi'e her sugar, an' she canna cast me; but she's no a bit better i' the hert o' her yet. She's an oonsanctifeed brute. I cudna think o' ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... tolls, the knell of parting day; The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea; The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... gateway to Theobald Park, stands Temple Bar, stone for stone intact as it was in the days when traitors' heads were raised above it in Fleet Street, although the original wooden gates are missing. Waltham Abbey is situated on the River Lea, near the point where King Alfred defeated the Danes in one of his battles. They had penetrated far up the river when King Alfred diverted the waters from beneath their vessels and left them stranded in a wilderness of ...
— British Highways And Byways From A Motor Car - Being A Record Of A Five Thousand Mile Tour In England, - Wales And Scotland • Thomas D. Murphy

... dernierement pardeca m'en a donne de la part de nostre Saint-Pere, de mettre sus et introduire l'inquisition selon la forme de droict, pour estre le vray moien d'extirper la racine de telles erreurs, pugnir et corriger ceulx qui lea font et commettent avec leurs imitateurs, toutes fois pour ce que en cela se sont trouvez quelques difficultez, alleguant ceulx des estats de mon royaume, lesquels ne veulent recevoir, approuver, ne observer la dicte inquisition, les troubles, divisions et aultres inconveniens qu'elle pourroit ...
— The Rise of the Hugenots, Vol. 1 (of 2) • Henry Martyn Baird

... rights have crazed thee? Would'st thou be A Winter Amazon, more fierce than he? Can Summer birds thy shrew-heroics sing? Wilt tend no more the daisies on the lea, Nor wake thy cowslips ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 101. October 24, 1891 • Various

... ages since, storm-tossed, And driven far inland from the roaring lea, Some baffled ocean-spirit, worn and lost, Here, through dry summer's dearth and winter's frost, Yearns for the sharp, sweet ...
— Songs from the Southland • Various

... over the lea, you have a full view of Darsie Latimer, with his new acquaintance, Wandering Willie, who, bating that he touched the ground now and then with his staff, not in a doubtful groping manner, but with the confident air of an experienced pilot, heaving ...
— Redgauntlet • Sir Walter Scott

... forest and lea, And casts in earth's lap all the wealth of the year; But the promise she brings wakes no transports in me, Still the landscape looks dim through the fast ...
— Enthusiasm and Other Poems • Susanna Moodie

... Love, she said, he wanders far Over the Southern sea; Nor Paris gay, nor ancient Rome, Could keep my love from me. The good ship drives through the misty night With the black rocks under the lea. To and fro, to and fro, Winter storms may come and go: You and I, ah! well we know Hope of ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2 No 4, October, 1862 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... let me enjoy it. Let me be childish; be thou childish with me. Freedom invites me! Oh, let me employ it Skimming with winged step light o'er the lea; Have I escaped from this mansion of mourning? Holds me no more the sad dungeon of care? Let me, with joy and with eagerness burning, Drink in the free, the ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... Institution of Great Britain; and Alfred Swaine Taylor, M.D., F.R.S., Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of London, and Professor of Chemistry and Medical Jurisprudence in Guy's Hospital. Philadelphia. Blanchard & Lea. 8vo. pp. ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 12, August, 1863, No. 70 - A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics • Various

... upon the looks of the landlady, and whether she was likely to allow us a tablecloth—and wish for such another honest hostess as Izaak Walton has described many a one on the pleasant banks of the Lea, when he went a fishing—and sometimes they would prove obliging enough, and sometimes they would look grudgingly upon us—but we had cheerful looks still for one another, and would eat our plain food savorily, scarcely grudging Piscator[7] his Trout ...
— English Prose - A Series of Related Essays for the Discussion and Practice • Frederick William Roe (edit. and select.)

... have been in danger of shipwreck, with a rocky shore close on the lea in a heavy gale, may understand the relief offered by a sudden shift of wind in the moment of extremity. Such experience alone can allow an appreciation of the mental reaction after a great strain of anxiety that I had ...
— Ismailia • Samuel W. Baker

... Duke of Sussex's Catalogue, and those of Lea Wilson, George Offor, Francis Fry, William Maskell, W. J. Loftie, W. J. Blew, Farmer-Atkinson, Lord Ashburnham, and the Rev. W. Makellar of Edinburgh, we must go for the means of bibliographically estimating the editions of the Scriptures and the Prayer-Book; and the Huth and Caxton ...
— The Book-Collector • William Carew Hazlitt

... on Oakridge lea, The other world's astir, The Cotswold Farmers silently Go back to sepulchre, The sleeping watchdogs wake, and see No ...
— Georgian Poetry 1916-17 - Edited by Sir Edward Howard Marsh • Various

... shall the wizard moon ascend The heavens, in the crimson end Of day's declining splendour; here The army of the stars appear. The neighbour hollows dry or wet, Spring shall with tender flowers beset; And oft the morning muser see Larks rising from the broomy lea, And every fairy wheel and thread Of cobweb dew-bediamonded. When daisies go, shall winter time Silver the simple grass with rime; Autumnal frosts enchant the pool And make the cart-ruts beautiful; And when snow-bright ...
— Underwoods • Robert Louis Stevenson

... pink and red, Before the Bumble Bee, A lover bold, with cloak of gold, Came singing merrily Along the sunlit ways that led From woodland, and from lea. ...
— Poems of Experience • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... thy soul; Shalt freely foot it where the poppies blow, Shalt fight unfettered when the cannon roll, And haply, Wanderer, when the hosts go home, Thou only still in Aveluy shalt roam, Haunting the crumbled windmill at Gavrelle And fling thy bombs across the silent lea, Drink with shy peasants at St. Catherine's Well And in the dusk go home ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Aug. 22, 1917 • Various

... several ways, Madame Belamour towards Bowstead, Mr. and Mrs. Arden on their sturdy roadster towards Lea Farm. ...
— Love and Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... most surprising features of the general election in Ireland is the complete collapse of the Liberal party. Not a single Liberal has returned for any constituency. Saturday's dispatches announced the defeat of Mr. Thomas Lea in West Donegal, and Mr. William Findlater in South Londonderry. That settles it. The list is closed. Every Liberal candidate who tried his fortune with an Irish constituency has suffered a signal discomfiture at the polls. Some of them have been beaten by ...
— Donahoe's Magazine, Volume 15, No. 1, January 1886 • Various

... by the lonesome road that lies across the lea Or whether by the hill that stoops, rock-shadowed, to the sea, Or by a sail that blows from far, my love returns ...
— Fires of Driftwood • Isabel Ecclestone Mackay

... They rested likewise, half-tired man and horse, And homeward went for food and courage new; Whereby refreshed, they turned again to toil, And lived in labour all the afternoon. Till, in the gloaming, once again the plough Lay like a stranded bark upon the lea; And home with hanging neck the horses went, Walking beside their master, force by will. Then through the deepening shades a ...
— A Hidden Life and Other Poems • George MacDonald

... the garments of woe, Sackcloth and ashes for aye; Winds of the South! oh, a requiem blow, Sighing and sorrow to-day. Sprinkle the showers from heaven's blue eyes Wide o'er the green summer lea, Rachel is weeping, oh! Lord of the skies, ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... convention met in the court-house of Albert Lea, October 9, 10. On the first evening Mrs. Chapman Catt was the speaker, her theme being A True Democracy. The Rev. Ida C. Hultin of Illinois lectured on The Crowning Race. Miss Laura A. Gregg and Miss Helen ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV • Various

... come not now to print the lea, In freak and dance around the tree, Or at the mushroom board to sup And drink the dew from the buttercup. A scene of sorrow waits them now, For an Ouphe has broken his vestal vow He has loved an earthly maid, And left for her his woodland shade; He has lain upon her ...
— Selections From American Poetry • Various

... breeze o'er the blossoming lea, Sure never winds swept past so sweet and low, No lonely, unblest future waiteth now; Dear Love for ...
— Poems • Marietta Holley

... grass, Demeter's daughter, fresh and fair, A child of light, a radiant lass, And gamesome as the morning air. The daffodils were fair to see, They nodded lightly on the lea; Persephone! Persephone! ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... there was no mainner o' accoontin' for nor explainin', as fowks sae set upo' duin' nooadays wi' a'thing. That explainin' I canna bide: it's jist a love o' leasin', an' taks the bluid oot o' a'thing, lea'in' life as wersh an' fusionless as kail wantin' saut. Them 'at h'ard it tellt me 'at there was NO accoontin', as I tell you, for the reemish they baith h'ard—whiles douf-like dunts, an' whiles speech ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... up and singing, And the hare was out and feeding on the lea; And the merry merry bells below were ringing, When my ...
— Andromeda and Other Poems • Charles Kingsley

... summer-time how glad am I When over lea or down A country lass mine eyes espy, Of ...
— The Evolution of Love • Emil Lucka

... of Bareacres are fair upon the lea, Where the cliffs of bonny Diddlesex rise up from out the sea: I stood upon the donjon keep and view'd the country o'er, I saw the lands of Bareacres for fifty miles or more. I stood upon the donjon keep—it is a sacred place,—Where floated for eight ...
— Burlesques • William Makepeace Thackeray

... the bare, oblong schoolroom with the brown desks, seven rows across for the lower school, one long form along the wall for Class One where she and Ada and Geraldine sat apart. Never look through the bay windows over the lea to the Channel, at sunset, Lundy Island flattened out, floating, gold on gold in the offing. Never see magenta valerian growing in hot white ...
— Mary Olivier: A Life • May Sinclair

... While glowworms light the lea, I'll show ye where the dead should be— Each in his shroud, While winds pipe loud, And the red moon peeps dim through the cloud. Follow, follow me; Brave should he be That treads by ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... on Latworth lea, And where'll she see such a jovial three As we, boys, we? And why is she pale? It's because she drinks water instead ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... water, or grass, and then we would continue on in the inky darkness as though our march was to last eternally, and poor Blackie would step out as if his natural state was one of perpetual motion. On the 4th November we rode over sixty miles; and when at length the camp was made in the lea of a little clump of bare willows, the snow was lying cold upon the prairies, and Blackie and his comrades went out to shiver through their supper in the bleakest scene my eyes had ...
— The Great Lone Land - A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the North-West of America • W. F. Butler

... quiet and satisfied about the fight that old Sam and Peter couldn't make 'im out at all. He wouldn't even practise punching at a bolster that Peter rigged up for 'im, and when 'e got a message from Bill Lumm naming a quiet place on the Lea Marshes he agreed to it as comfortable ...
— Odd Craft, Complete • W.W. Jacobs

... little way down Notting Hill: thence it runs north-east to Primrose Hill, and so on; rather a narrow strip of it gets through Kingsland to Stoke-Newington and Clapton, where it spreads out along the heights above the Lea marshes; on the other side of which, as you know, is Epping Forest holding out a hand to it. This part we are just coming to is called Kensington Gardens; though why ...
— News from Nowhere - or An Epoch of Rest, being some chapters from A Utopian Romance • William Morris

... myself into this wholly. It seems to me the most suggestive history now to be written. The material at hand is ample and easily accessible. A multitude of historians have made remarkable contributions to it, and among these, in our own country, Irving, Prescott, Motley, Ticknor, and Lea; in England, Froude, Ford, Buckle, and others have given many pregnant suggestions and some increase of knowledge; Germany and France have contributed much in the form of printed books; Spain, much in the publication of ...
— Autobiography of Andrew Dickson White Volume II • Andrew Dickson White

... him! call him over the lea, Thou sad forsaken lass, Never more he'll come back to thee ...
— Tales from Many Sources - Vol. V • Various

... States have been investigated. Schweinitz[U] first made known to any extent the riches of this country, especially Carolina, and in this state the late Dr. Curtis and H. W. Ravenel continued their labours. With the exception of Lea's collections in Cincinnati, Wright's in Texas, and some contributions from Ohio, Alabama, Massachusetts, and New York, a great portion of this vast country is mycologically unknown. It is remarkably rich in fleshy fungi, not only in Agaricini, but also in Discomycetes, containing a large ...
— Fungi: Their Nature and Uses • Mordecai Cubitt Cooke

... All Nature to me! How bright the sun beameth, How fresh is the lea! White blossoms are bursting The thickets among, And all the gay greenwood Is ringing with song! There's radiance and rapture That nought can destroy, Oh earth, in thy sunshine, Oh heart, in thy joy. Oh love! thou enchanter So golden ...
— The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and - Modern Times • Alfred Biese

... and of Spring has loosen'd Winter's thrall; The well-dried keels are wheel'd again to sea: The ploughman cares not for his fire, nor cattle for their stall, And frost no more is whitening all the lea. Now Cytherea leads the dance, the bright moon overhead; The Graces and the Nymphs, together knit, With rhythmic feet the meadow beat, while Vulcan, fiery red, Heats the Cyclopian forge in Aetna's pit. 'Tis now the time to wreathe the brow with branch of myrtle ...
— Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace • Horace

... bad. She gives a pretty good swish at the face o' the harbour when the weather's rough from the south-east, and flies over on to the boats; but Bar Lea Point yonder takes all the rough of it and shelters us like. If the young gent looks down now, he ...
— Menhardoc • George Manville Fenn

... mid-way measured course Gliding;—not torrent-like with fury spilt, Impetuous, o'er Himalah's rifted side, To ravage blind and wide, And leave a lifeless wreck of parching silt;— Gliding by thorpe and tower and grange and lea In tranquil transit to the ...
— The Visions of England - Lyrics on leading men and events in English History • Francis T. Palgrave

... Utrecht Psalter. Mr. Disraeli thought the scheme absurd. "Of course," he said, "you won't get it." He was told that, nevertheless, such things are, that public manuscripts had even been sent across the Atlantic in order that Mr. Lea might write a history of the Inquisition. "Yes," he replied, "but they never came back again." The work which has been awaited so long has come over at last, and will assuredly be accepted as the most important ...
— The History of Freedom • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... plundering in Sussex nigh Chichester; but the townsmen put them to flight, and slew many hundreds of them, and took some of their ships. Then, in the same year, before winter, the Danes, who abode in Mersey, towed their ships up on the Thames, and thence up the Lea. That was about two years after that they came ...
— The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle • Unknown

... clowk about your head, An' flee awa' to Flanners. Flee owre firth, an' flee owre fell, Flee owre pule, an' rinnan well, Flee owre muir, an' flee owre mead, Flee owre livan, flee owre dead, Flee owre corn, an' flee owre lea, Flee owre river, flee owre sea, Flee ye east, or flee ye west, Flee till him ...
— Rhymes Old and New • M.E.S. Wright

... ma kona ano Makaula nui no Kauai, a ia ia i hiki ai iluna pono o Kalalea, ike mai la oia i ka pio a keia anuenue i Oahu nei; noho iho la oia malaila he iwakalua la, i kumu e ike maopopoi'ai o ke ano o kana mea e ike nei. Ia manawa, ua, maopopo lea i ka Makaula he Alii Nui ka mea nona keia anuenue e pio nei, a me na onohi elua i hoopuniia i na ao ...
— The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai • Anonymous

... make a saint swear! Why, I tell you, if this paper, the loss of which seems to sit so light on you, be not found, farewell to the fair lordship of Glenvarloch—firth and forest—lea and furrow—lake and stream—all that has been in the house of Olifaunt since the days ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... the hill Grows different flowers than the vale and lea: But here and there in German homes there will Be found some hearts who fondly turn to thee; Where merry fellows are their wine enjoying With cheerful songs, thy praises will resound; Near landscape-painters' easels thou art lying, And in a huntsman's bag thou oft art found, And ...
— The Trumpeter of Saekkingen - A Song from the Upper Rhine. • Joseph Victor von Scheffel

... willow, o'er the lea! And willow once again! The Peer will fall in love with me! Why wasn't ...
— More Bab Ballads • W. S. Gilbert

... was our army that morning That stood by the cypress and pine When Sherman said, "Boys, you are weary; This day fair Savannah is thine," Then sang we a song for our chieftain That echoed o'er river and lea, And the stars on our banner shone brighter When Sherman marched on ...
— The Good Old Songs We Used to Sing, '61 to '65 • Osbourne H. Oldroyd

... carle cam ower the lea, Wi' mony good-e'ens and good-morrows to me, Saying, Kind Sir, for your courtesy, Will ye lodge a silly puir ...
— The Antiquary, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... bright and deep, Where the gray trout lies asleep, Up the river and o'er the lea, That's the way ...
— Fifty Famous People • James Baldwin

... Winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything we are out of tune; It moves us not. Great God! I'd rather be A pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea: Or hear old Triton ...
— Wordsworth • F. W. H. Myers

... importance was the death of Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, at the age of thirty-eight. He was the grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, and the son of the gifted Lea Solomon-Bartholdy, from whom he received his first piano lessons. At the age of ten he joined the Singing Academy of Berlin, where a composition of his, the "Nineteenth Psalm," was performed shortly after his entry. ...
— A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year - Volume Two (of Three) • Edwin Emerson

... upon the flower, and a silence hangs that only breaks in distant innuendo of the rivers or the low of cattle on the Cowal shore. The great bays lapse into hills that float upon a purple haze, forest nor lea has any sign of spring's extravagance or the flame of the autumn that fires Dunchuach till it blazes like a torch. All is in the light sleep of the year's morning, and what, I have thought, if God in His pious whim should never awake it ...
— John Splendid - The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn • Neil Munro

... the instant invasion of Yen,—a purpose which perhaps he had in view in his insult to the prince. The ruler of that state, to avert the emperor's wrath, sent him the head of Tan, whom he had ordered to execution. But as the army continued to advance, he fled into the wilds of Lea-vu-tung, abandoning his territory to the invader. In the same year the kingdom of Wei was invaded, its capital taken, and its ruler sent to the ...
— Historic Tales, Vol. 12 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... Schrader, Reallexicon, Art. "Keuschheit." He considers that Tacitus merely shows that German women were usually chaste after marriage. A few centuries later, Lea points out, Salvianus, while praising the barbarians generally for their chastity, makes an exception in the case of the Alemanni. (See also Havelock Ellis, Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Vol. VI, "Sex in Relation to ...
— The Task of Social Hygiene • Havelock Ellis

... Soon night Drew his murky curtains round The world, while a star of lustre bright Peep'd from the blue profound. Yet what cared we for darkening lea, Or warning bell remote? With rush and cry we scudded by, And seized the ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 55, No. 343, May 1844 • Various

... Lorraine glass, which throw a sunlit view over everything, and make the heart glad with little things, and thankful for small mercies! Such glasses had honest Izaak Walton, who, coming in from a fishing expedition on the river Lea, burst out into such grateful little talks as this: "Let us, as we walk home under the cool shade of this honeysuckle hedge, mention some of the thoughts and joys that have possessed my soul since we two met. And that our present happiness may appear the greater, and we more thankful ...
— How to Succeed - or, Stepping-Stones to Fame and Fortune • Orison Swett Marden

... summer wreaths are cast, And the blue gentian flower, that, in the breeze, Nods lonely, of her beauteous race the last. Yet a few sunny days, in which the bee Shall murmur by the hedge that skirts the way, The cricket chirp upon the russet lea, And man delight to linger in thy ray. Yet one rich smile, and we will try to bear The piercing winter frost, and ...
— Poems • William Cullen Bryant

... my indebtedness to Messrs. Lea and Febiger, the J. B. Lippincott Co., and to the editors of the American Journal of Insanity, and the Journal of the American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology, for their kind permission to reprint some of ...
— Studies in Forensic Psychiatry • Bernard Glueck

... wilt thou wander with me? We will roam through the forest, the meadow, and lea; We will haunt the sunny bowers, and when day begins to flee, Our couch shall be the ferny brake, our canopy the tree. Merry maid, merry maid, come and wander with me! No life like the gipsy's, ...
— Rookwood • William Harrison Ainsworth

... Morven's mossy mead. Wild thoughts and vain ambitions circle near, Whilst I, at peace, the abbey chimings hear. Loud shakes the surge of Life's unquiet sea, Yet smooth the stream that laves the rustic lea. Let others feel the world's destroying thrill, As 'midst the kine I haunt the verdant hill. Rise, radiant sun! to light the grassy glades, Whose charms I view from grateful beechen shades; O'er spire and peak diffuse th' expanding gleam That gilds ...
— Writings in the United Amateur, 1915-1922 • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

... by Smollett, however, is a more severe form of torture even than that practised by the Inquisition, and we can only hope that his description of its brutality is highly coloured. [See the extremely learned disquisition on the whole subject in Dr. H. C. Lea's History of the Inquisition in Spain, 1907, vol. iii. book vi chap. vii.] Smollett must have enjoyed himself vastly in the market at Nice. He gives an elaborate and epicurean account of his commissariat ...
— Travels Through France and Italy • Tobias Smollett

... "Landscape where the richest element Is a little sunshine innocent."... "No one runs to revel On thy rail-fenced lea."... "Debate with no man hast thou, With questions art never perplexed, As tame at the first sight as now, In thy plain russet gabardine dressed."... "Come ye who love, And ye who hate, Children of the Holy Dove, And Guy Faux of the state, And hang conspiracies ...
— Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience • Henry David Thoreau

... preacher's dictation— From all the dreaded lore of the books— Escaped from the thraldom of study, We turn to the babble of brooks; We hark to the field-minstrels' music, The lowing of herds on the lea, The surge of the winds in the forest, The roar of ...
— Happy Days for Boys and Girls • Various

... are fed, The snow lies deep on lawn and lea, The skies are shining overhead, The robin's tame that was so free. Far North, at home, the 'barley bree' They brew; they give the hour to folly, How 'Rab and Allan cam to pree,' They sing, we sing Heigh-ho, ...
— Ban and Arriere Ban • Andrew Lang

... have labored to demonstrate the blighting effect that the censorship was supposed to have on literature. But it is surprising how few examples they can bring. Lea, who ought to know the Spanish field exhaustively, can only point to a few professors of theology who were persecuted and silenced for expressing unconventional views on biblical criticism. He conjectures ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... lies astrand— Soon his couch lay Rhoderick Dhu, And oft his fevered limbs he threw In toss abrupt, as when her sides Lie rocking in the advancing tides, That shake her frame with ceaseless beat, Yet can not heave her from her seat;— O, how unlike her course on sea! Or his free step on hill and lea!—Lady of the Lake. ...
— The Red Acorn • John McElroy

... Savery. His early Religious Experience. Letter from Joseph Whitall. He marries Sarah Tatum. His interest in Colored People. Charles Webster. Ben Jackson. Thomas Cooper. A Child Kidnapped. Wagelma. James Poovey. Romaine. David Lea. The Slave Hunter. William Bachelor. Levin Smith. Etienne Lamaire. Samuel Johnson. Pierce Butler's Ben. Daniel Benson. The Quick-Witted Slave. James Davis. Mary Holliday. Thomas Harrison. James Lawler. William Anderson. Sarah Roach. Zeke. Poor Amy. Manuel. Slaveholders ...
— Isaac T. Hopper • L. Maria Child

... was a flash of lightning overhead, and a crackle of thunder rolled down the valley, heard louder than all the howling of the hurricane across the mountain sides. And then, when they had reached this place of shelter, Macleod dismounted, and crept as close as he could into the lea of the rocks. ...
— Macleod of Dare • William Black

... proceedings of church and town-house, but time was soon to show the value of such demonstrations. Meantime, the "muzzle" had been fastened with solemnity and accepted with docility. The terms of the treaty concluded at Plessis lea Tours and Bordeaux were made public. The Duke had subscribed to twenty-seven articles; which made as stringent and sensible a constitutional compact as could be desired by any Netherland patriot. These articles, taken in connection with the ancient charters which they expressly ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... herring-boats, their brown sails gleaming like gold against the dark angry water as they fluttered out to sea, unmindful of the leaden clouds banked up along the west, and all the symptoms of an approaching gale. The next morning it was upon us; but brought up as we were under the lea of a high rock, the tempest tore harmlessly over our heads, and left us at liberty to make the final ...
— Letters From High Latitudes • The Marquess of Dufferin (Lord Dufferin)

... I were where Helen lies; Night and day on me she cries; O that I were where Helen lies On fair Kirconnell lea. ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... certain words and phrases, which a good writer uses only when he must, Mr. Beckett always when he can. We give without comment a mere list of these:—maugre, 'sdeath, eke, erst, deft, romaunt, pleasaunce, certes, whilom, distraught, quotha, good lack, well-a-day, vermeil, perchance, hight, wight, lea, wist, list, sheen, anon, gliff, astrolt, what boots it? malfortunes, ween, God wot, I trow, emprise, duress, donjon, puissant, sooth, rock, bruit, ken, eld, o'ersprent, etc. Of course, such a word as "lady" is made to do good service, and "ye" asserts its well-known superiority ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... was originally spelt, is derived from Hurst, a wood, Legh or Lea, a meadow or open place ...
— John Keble's Parishes • Charlotte M Yonge

... the giftie gie us To see oursels as others see us! It wad frae mony a blunder free us And foolish notion: What airs in dress and gait wad lea'e us And even devotion!" ...
— Analyzing Character • Katherine M. H. Blackford and Arthur Newcomb

... bigot spires, ye Tory towers, That crown the watery lea, Where grateful science still adores ...
— The Life of Sir James Fitzjames Stephen, Bart., K.C.S.I. - A Judge of the High Court of Justice • Sir Leslie Stephen

... it might he inconvenient for me in some respects, but I would be quite contented to resign the bargain rather than that more loss should be incurred. I saw, I told them, no other receipt than lying lea for a little, while taking a fallow-break to relieve my imagination, which may be esteemed nearly cropped out. I can make shift for myself amid this failure of prospects; but I think both Cadell and J.B. will be probable sufferers. However, they are very right ...
— The Journal of Sir Walter Scott - From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford • Walter Scott

... moves To kirk and market, to mild loves And modest hates, and still the sight Of brown kind faces, and when night Draws dark around with age and fear Theirs is the simple hope to cheer.— A land of peace where lost romance And ghostly shine of helm and lance Still dwell by castled scarp and lea, And the last homes of chivalry, And the good fairy folk, my dear, Who speak for cunning souls to hear, In crook of glen and bower of hill Sing ...
— The Moon Endureth—Tales and Fancies • John Buchan

... the homing hour is here, The task is done. Toilers, and they who course the deer Turn, one by one, At day's demise, Where dwells a deathless glow In loving eyes. I hear them hearthward go To castle, or to cottage on the lea; But him I love comes never ...
— Kansas Women in Literature • Nettie Garmer Barker

... Isabel, and very unfavorable for the flatboats in which the pursuers chased them. As Dan had anticipated, the slave-hunters were on the alert; and as the Isabel was standing through a narrow channel between two islands, the two boats, which had chased her in the morning, dashed out from under the lea of ...
— Watch and Wait - or The Young Fugitives • Oliver Optic

... John Allen, John Parteridge, William Aitkins, Joseph Rogers, Thomas Cock, John Berry, William Hutton, Thomas Cheek Lea, Durant Hidson, ...
— An History of Birmingham (1783) • William Hutton

... are sighing Over land and sea; The autumn woods are dying Over hill and lea; And my heart is sighing, dying, Maiden, ...
— The Portent & Other Stories • George MacDonald

... danger, and in a moment they had the turf of the yew-tree walk under their feet. It was lighter here, or at least it was just perceptibly less dark; for the yew walk was wider than the path that had led them under the lea of the house. Looking up, they could see between the high black hedges a strip of sky and ...
— Crome Yellow • Aldous Huxley

... Cooper your shells. He knows more about fresh water shells than any naturalist in New York. By the way, have you seen Mr. Lea's splendid monograph (with colored plates) of Unios, in the Transactions of the ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... children, we readily dedicate these local illustrations to the furtherance of his good work. The ugliest place we know in the neighbourhood of London, the most dismal and forlorn, is not Hackney Marshes, or those of the Lea, beyond Old Ford, at the East-end; but it is the tract of land, half torn up for brick-field clay, half consisting of fields laid waste in expectation of the house-builder, which lies just outside of Shepherd's Bush and Notting Hill. There it is that the ...
— Gipsy Life - being an account of our Gipsies and their children • George Smith

... the days waxed on to weeks, It was a pretty sight to see These lambs with frisky heads and tails Skipping and leaping on the lea, 20 Bleating in tender, trustful tones, Resting on rocky crag or mound. And following the beloved feet That once had sought ...
— Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems • Christina Rossetti

... September of the year 1651 the afternoon sun was shining pleasantly into the dining-hall of Forest Lea House. The sunshine came through a large bay-window, glazed in diamonds, and with long branches of a vine trailing across it, but in parts the glass had been broken and had never been mended. The walls were wainscoted with dark oak, as well as the floor, which shone bright with ...
— The Pigeon Pie • Charlotte M. Yonge



Words linked to "Lea" :   pace, commons, common land, ley, linear unit, grassland, yard, rural area, linear measure, cow pasture, country



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