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Infectious disease   /ɪnfˈɛkʃəs dɪzˈiz/   Listen
Infectious disease

noun
1.
A disease transmitted only by a specific kind of contact.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Infectious disease" Quotes from Famous Books



... premenstrual internal secretion reaction are the extremes of a vast number and variety of types. There are women in an unstable quasi-premenstrual state for the greater part of their lives. Sometimes an infectious disease or a psychic blow will put a woman into this class. The significance of these cyclic changes has been tremendously increased by the recent formal admission of women to participation in public activities on a plane of ...
— The Glands Regulating Personality • Louis Berman, M.D.

... conditions the increase of circulation is transitory. In fevers there is an increased redness in the mucous membrane, and this continues so long as the fever lasts. In some diseases red spots or streaks form in the mucous membrane. This usually indicates an infectious disease of considerable severity, and occurs in blood poisoning, purpura hemorrhagica, hemorrhagic septicemia, and in urticaria. When the liver is deranged and does not operate, or when the red-blood corpuscles are broken down, as in serious cases of influenza, there is ...
— Special Report on Diseases of the Horse • United States Department of Agriculture

... are attending a sick person a current of air that has passed over the patient should be avoided. We may approach with safety very near a person who has an infectious disease, provided care is taken to keep on the side from which the currents of air ...
— A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (Revised Edition) • Calvin Cutter

... buildings of the North-Western Hospital. The brick wall encloses a house and front-garden at one time belonging to Sir Rowland Hill. This site was acquired by the Metropolitan Asylums Board in 1868, and was destined to be used for cases of infectious disease, a plan which provoked the greatest agitation in the parish. In 1870 a severe epidemic of small-pox broke out, and some wards were hastily built in addition to those which had already been used for fever patients. As ...
— Hampstead and Marylebone - The Fascination of London • Geraldine Edith Mitton

... Infectious disease was one of the grave perils with which the slavers had to reckon. The overcrowding of the slaves, the lack of exercise and fresh air, the wretched and insufficient food, all combined to make grave, general sickness an incident of almost every ...
— American Merchant Ships and Sailors • Willis J. Abbot

... common preventives against infection are such as are peculiarly inimical to every kind of insect; camphor, chloride of lime, tobacco-smoke, and powerful scents and smokes of any kind. The first impulse on the appearance of an infectious disease is to purify everything as much as possible, and by extra cleanliness and fumigations to endeavor to arrest its progress. The great purifier of Nature is a violent wind, which usually terminates an epidemic immediately; ...
— Eight Years' Wandering in Ceylon • Samuel White Baker

... not of his, a codicil, and not of his, not in the body of his testaments, but interlined and postscribed by others, that the way to the communion of saints should be by such a solitude as excludes all doing of good here. That is a disease of the mind, as the height of an infectious disease of the body is solitude, to be left alone: for this makes an infectious bed equal, nay, worse than a grave, that though in both I be equally alone, in my bed I know it, and feel it, and shall not in my grave: and this too, that in my bed my soul is still in an infectious body, ...
— Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions - Together with Death's Duel • John Donne

... The relapsing fever is an infectious disease or possibly a group of closely related infectious diseases occurring in various parts of the world. Occasionally it is introduced into America, but it does not seem to spread here. It has been shown that the disease is communicated from ...
— Insects and Diseases - A Popular Account of the Way in Which Insects may Spread - or Cause some of our Common Diseases • Rennie W. Doane

... overcrowding. There must be a maximum number of inhabitants to any tenement, and a really sane law will be far more stringent to secure space and air for young children than for adults. There is little reason, except the possible harbouring of parasites and infectious disease, why five or six adults should not share a cask on a dust heap as a domicile—if it pleases them. But directly children come in we touch the future. The minimum permissible tenement for a maximum of two adults and a very young child is one properly ventilated room ...
— Mankind in the Making • H. G. Wells

... disease threaten a village or town, the disorder will be stayed by a live toad being suspended for three or four days in a chimney. The dried body of a dead toad, worn in the breast, prevents the possessor of the charm from being injured by any infectious disease. Hippocrates had great honours conferred on him on account of the cures he effected by the application of certain parts of reptiles to disordered persons. The heart of a toad, suspended by a blue ribbon round ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... problem of the relation of syphilis to marriage is simply an aspect of the transmission of an infectious disease. The infection of one party to the marriage by the other and the transmission of that infection to children summarizes the social problem. Through the intimate contacts of family life, syphilis attacks the ...
— The Third Great Plague - A Discussion of Syphilis for Everyday People • John H. Stokes

... Ship Two Brothers on her voyage from New Orleans to this point having put into Charleston S.C. there contracted the yellow fever or some other infectious disease, by which two of her crew have died. Exercising a discretionary power given by the quarantine laws to the Superintendant, I have caused this ship to commence her quarantine near this place between Rozins Bluff and Jones Point. As the removal of vessels from this port to the mouth of Elizabeth River ...
— Seaport in Virginia - George Washington's Alexandria • Gay Montague Moore

... had been ill for a long time with cancer of the stomach, and after the funeral Rushton & Co. had to clean and repaint and paper the room she had occupied during her illness. Although cancer is not supposed to be an infectious disease, they had orders to take all the bedding away and have it burnt. Sawkins was instructed to take a truck to the house and get the bedding and take it to the town Refuse Destructor to be destroyed. There were two feather beds, a ...
— The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists • Robert Tressell

... acts were in the nature of quarantine regulations and usually dealt solely with interstate transportation. In 1884 the exportation or shipment in interstate commerce of livestock having any infectious disease was forbidden.[488] In 1903 power was conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture to establish regulations to prevent the spread of such diseases through foreign or interstate commerce.[489] In 1905 the same official was authorized ...
— The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation • Edward Corwin

... this, our desire to worship incompetence, to an infectious disease. It has attacked the State at the very core, in its constitution, and it is not surprising that it is spreading rapidly to the customs and to ...
— The Cult of Incompetence • Emile Faguet

... expect me to be happy and content while you behave as you are doing now? You never speak to me; you never look at me; you fly from me as if I were an infectious disease. It is—unbearable," she ended ...
— The Halo • Bettina von Hutten

... poor, in the minute fulfillment of her duties, and on her knees in church. After acting one part of the evening, she would hasten, on the fall of the curtain, to pass the rest of it watching by the bedside of some poor wretch stricken low perhaps by some infectious disease. During the war of 1870, Madame Volnis's conduct was angelical. If there was some awful operation to be performed upon any of the wounded soldiers sent to Nice from the field of battle, it was she who was present, who held the sufferer's hand, and who consoled and cheered with the tenderness ...
— Lippincott's Magazine Of Popular Literature And Science, April 1875, Vol. XV., No. 88 • Various

... bitch that died after giving birth to eight pups — which might just as easily have caused her death under other conditions. What was the cause of death in the other case we were unable to find out; at any rate, it was not an infectious disease. ...
— The South Pole, Volumes 1 and 2 • Roald Amundsen

... may mention another bearing of biological knowledge—a more practical one in the ordinary sense of the word. Consider the theory of infectious disease. Surely that is of interest to all of us. Now the theory of infectious disease is rapidly being elucidated by biological study. It is possible to produce, from among the lower animals, examples of devastating diseases which spread in the same manner as ...
— Science & Education • Thomas H. Huxley

... which for a long time puzzled us as to the possibility of their inheritance, but which have now resolved themselves clearly into instances of the fact that a mother who happens to contract an acute infectious disease of any sort may communicate that disease to the unborn child. If this occurs at an early stage of development the child will naturally be promptly killed. In fact, this is the almost invariable result in smallpox and yellow fever. If, on the other ...
— Preventable Diseases • Woods Hutchinson

... suffer from an attack of pneumonia that so weakens the disease-resisting powers of the lungs as to result in a tubercular infection of these organs. In the horse, one attack of azoturia predisposes it to a second attack. One attack of an infectious disease usually confers immunity against that particular disease. Heredity does not play as important a part in the development of diseases in domestic animals as in the human race. A certain family may inherit a predisposition to disease through the faulty or insufficient ...
— Common Diseases of Farm Animals • R. A. Craig, D. V. M.

... in other words, is the bogy that haunts him night and day. Hence his life is enmeshed, as Dr. Frazer puts it, in a network of taboos. A taboo is anything that one must not do lest ill-luck befall. And ill-luck is catching, like an infectious disease. If my next-door neighbour breaks a taboo, and brings down a visitation on himself, depend upon it some of its unpleasant consequences will be passed on to me and mine. Hence, if some one has committed an act that is not merely a crime but a sin, it is every one's concern ...
— Anthropology • Robert Marett



Words linked to "Infectious disease" :   enteric fever, hepatitis, leprosy, Indian cholera, herpes, brucellosis, glandular fever, rickettsiosis, infectious mononucleosis, mumps, epidemic cholera, Mediterranean fever, breakbone fever, Malta fever, poliomyelitis, yellow jack, AIDS, typhoid, framboesia, tb, miliary fever, frambesia, epidemic disease, kissing disease, Hansen's disease, Asiatic cholera, rickettsial disease, yellow fever, cholera, pertussis, paratyphoid fever, yaws, dengue fever, listeriosis, rheumatic fever, sweating sickness, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, recurrent fever, tuberculosis, infantile paralysis, paratyphoid, ratbite fever, polio, Gibraltar fever, T.B., dysentery, dengue, mononucleosis, relapsing fever, whooping cough, epidemic parotitis, acute anterior poliomyelitis, undulant fever, typhoid fever, communicable disease, dandy fever, listeria meningitis, black vomit, mono, meningitis, Rock fever



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