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Herb   /ərb/  /hərb/   Listen
Herb

noun
1.
A plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests.  Synonym: herbaceous plant.
2.
Aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities.



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"Herb" Quotes from Famous Books



... is rather a strange title; but I read once somewhere that the story about it is, that the Spirit of Evil, envying the good which this herb might do to mankind, bit away part of it and thence ...
— Bob Strong's Holidays - Adrift in the Channel • John Conroy Hutcheson

... until Henry also made a catch and then they gathered more plums and berries. They dug up, too, the root of the Indian turnip, an herb that burnt the mouth like fire, but which Henry said they could use, after soaking it a long time in water. Then they discussed the matter of the fish trap which they thought they could make in a day's work. ...
— The Young Trailers - A Story of Early Kentucky • Joseph A. Altsheler

... necessary to avoid this beverage if such restlessness is to be escaped; still it will generally be found that in cases in which tea has caused serious wakefulness and restless tossing, that there is more than the mere effect of the herb, and that superabundant heat is present also; then the application already pointed ...
— Papers on Health • John Kirk

... when a famish'd wolf, that all night long Had ranged the Alpine snows, by chance at morn Sees from a cliff, incumbent o'er the smoke Of some lone village, a neglected kid That strays along the wild for herb or spring; Down from the winding ridge he sweeps amain, And thinks he tears him: so with tenfold rage, 530 The monster sprung remorseless on his prey. Amazed the stripling stood: with panting breast Feebly he pour'd the lamentable wail Of helpless consternation, struck at ...
— Poetical Works of Akenside - [Edited by George Gilfillan] • Mark Akenside

... or Knotted, and Pot.—Hardy annuals. Aromatic and sweet flavour. Used for stuffings and as a pot herb; leaves dried ...
— Gardening for the Million • Alfred Pink

... sense.' A man must have his sense to imitate him worthily. How we look through his words at the Deluge, as he floods it upon us in Book xi. l. 738-53!—The Attic bees produce honey so flavoured with the thyme of Hymettus that it is scarcely eatable, though to smell the herb itself in a breezy walk upon that celebrated Mount would be an exceeding pleasure; thus certain epic poems are overpoweringly flavoured with herbs of Milton, while yet the fragrant balm and fresh breeze of his poetry is not to ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... his cauld blastis keyne, Has slain this gentil herb, that I of mene; Quhois piteous death dois to my heart sic paine That I would make to plant his root againe,— So confortand ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... carry their captors. Some, however, caught sight of the little calabashes of coca which the English carried. That woke them from their torpor, and they began coaxing abjectly (and not in vain), for a taste of that miraculous herb, which would not only make food unnecessary, and enable their panting lungs to endure the keen mountain air, but would rid them, for a while at least, of the fallen Indian's most unpitying foe, the malady ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8 • Charles H. Sylvester

... the procession at the Abbey, the Herb-woman and her Maids, and the Serjeant-Porter, remained at the entrance within the great ...
— Coronation Anecdotes • Giles Gossip

... name of a small insectivorous plant, Pinguicula vulgaris, which grows in wet, boggy land. It is a herb with a rosette of fleshy, oblong leaves, 1 to 3 in. long, appressed to the ground, of a pale colour and with a sticky surface. Small insects settle on the leaves and are caught in the viscid excretion. This, like the excretion ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 - "Bulgaria" to "Calgary" • Various

... render their view other than hypothetical. Agreeing that plants and animals were produced by Omnipotent fiat does not exclude the idea of natural order and what we call secondary causes. The record of the fiat—"Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed," etc., "and it was so;" "let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle and creeping thing and beast of the earth after his kind, and it was so"—seems even to imply them. Agreeing that they were ...
— Evolution and Ethics and Other Essays • Thomas H. Huxley

... The holotype was found on a moss-covered log over a stream in dense cloud forest by day. The paratype was calling at night from a low herb at the edge of a small stream in the cloud forest. Nearby a Ptychohyla ...
— Descriptions of Two Species of Frogs, Genus Ptychohyla - Studies of American Hylid Frogs, V • William E. Duellman

... pile of stones. He deposited the stake in its proper place, and returned to find her seated on the ground, plucking a handful of the leaves of a little erect herb that grew abundantly in the hollow. These she rubbed together and held to her face inside ...
— The Claim Jumpers • Stewart Edward White

... herb." Davis, who visited Sumatra in 1599 (Purchas i. 120) speaks "of a kind of seed, whereof a little being eaten, maketh a man to turn foole, all things seeming to him to be metamorphosed." Linschoten's "Dutroa" was a poppy-like bud containing small ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... and adapting part of his sermon paper to the handle of the teakettle, poured the boiling water on some herb drink for ...
— The May Flower, and Miscellaneous Writings • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... old-fashioned kind who believed in big doses and three pills at a time, and something new every week or two; but, in addition to his prescriptions, Mrs. Bright tried all sorts of queer patent physics which people told her of, or which she read about in the newspapers. She also took a great deal of herb tea of different sorts. There was always a little porringer of something steaming away on her stove,—camomile, or boneset, or wormwood, or snakeroot, or tansy, and always a long row of fat bottles with labels on ...
— Eyebright - A Story • Susan Coolidge

... ladies met at the house of the Rev. Mr. Parsons, who preached to them a sermon from Proverbs 31-19. They spun and presented to Mrs. Parsons two hundred and seventy skeins of good yarn." They drank "liberty tea." This makeshift of a beverage was made of the four-leaved loosestrife. The herb was pulled up like flax, its stalks were stripped of the leaves and were boiled. The leaves were put in a kettle and basted with the liquor distilled from the stalks. After this the leaves were dried in ...
— Sabbath in Puritan New England • Alice Morse Earle

... after rubbing their black noses with cinnabar powder, which they carried in a sack, bowed to the ground. Then Alvez, advancing in his turn, handed the king a supply of fresh tobacco—"soothing herb," as they call it in the country. Moini Loungga had great need of being soothed, for he was, they did not know why, in a ...
— Dick Sand - A Captain at Fifteen • Jules Verne

... some boisterous doubts. For, hearing that an hour or two previous she had been partaking of some twenty unripe bananas, I rather fancied that that circumstance might have had something to do with her sufferings. But however it was, all the herb-leeches on the island would not have altered her own ...
— Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2) • Herman Melville

... one avalanche its cloy Of ice and snow, so doth her breast employ Its hidden store of blushes; and they wreak Destruction, as they crush my aching heart,— Destruction, wild, relentless, and as sure As the poor Alpine hamlet's; and no art Can hide my agony, no herb can cure My wound. Her very blush says, "We must part." Why was it always ...
— When hearts are trumps • Thomas Winthrop Hall

... the next court, and on her way she borrowed a cup; of odd saucers she had plenty, serving as plates when occasion required. Half an ounce of tea and a quarter of a pound of butter went far to absorb her morning's wages; but this was an unusual occasion. In general, she used herb-tea for herself, when at home, unless some thoughtful mistress made a present of tea-leaves from her more abundant household. The two chairs drawn out for visitors, and duly swept and dusted; an old board arranged with some skill upon two old candle boxes set on end (rather rickety to be sure, ...
— Mary Barton • Elizabeth Gaskell

... vulgare).—Dried fennel herb, when ground, enters into the composition of some sachet powders. The oil of fennel, in conjunction with other aromatic oils, may be used for perfuming soap. ...
— The Art of Perfumery - And Methods of Obtaining the Odors of Plants • G. W. Septimus Piesse

... late, some of our horses having wandered in the night, the feed at the camp not being very good; indeed the only green herb met by us, for some considerable distance, has been the sow or milk thistle (Sonchus oleraceus), which grows to a considerable height. Of this the horses are extremely fond: it is also very fattening. ...
— Australia Twice Traversed, The Romance of Exploration • Ernest Giles

... being! In Tuscany, my own dear sunny land, Our nobles were but citizens and merchants,[170] Like Cosmo. We had evils, but not such As these; and our all-ripe and gushing valleys 710 Made poverty more cheerful, where each herb Was in itself a meal, and every vine Rained, as it were, the beverage which makes glad The heart of man; and the ne'er unfelt sun (But rarely clouded, and when clouded, leaving His warmth behind in memory of his beams) Makes the worn mantle, ...
— The Works of Lord Byron - Poetry, Volume V. • Lord Byron

... o'er my body rise— But only earth above, and sunny skies. Thus would I lowly lie in peaceful rest, Nursing the Herb Divine from out my breast. Green let it grow above this clay of mine, Deriving strength from strength that I resign. So in the days to come, when I'm beyond This fickle life, will come my lovers fond, And gazing on the plant, their grief restrain ...
— Pipe and Pouch - The Smoker's Own Book of Poetry • Various

... in swine, but not in cow. My second is in quarrel, but not in row. My third is in rip, but not in tear. My fourth is in pretty, but not in fair. My fifth is in herb, but not in root. My sixth is in inch, but not in foot. My seventh is in rake, but not in hoe. My eighth is in yes, but not in no. My whole is a ...
— Harper's Young People, April 6, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... an old dog, stark naked, an acrobat, and of Moorish descent like themselves. For this almost nameless crime it was equally decided by the king, people, and the churchmen that the Mooress, to pay for all, should be burned and cooked alive in the square near the fountain where the herb market is. Then the good man Bruyn clearly and dextrously demonstrated to the others that it would be a thing most profitable and pleasant to God to gain over this African soul to the true religion, and if the devil were lodged in this feminine body the faggots would be useless to burn him, as said ...
— Droll Stories, Complete - Collected From The Abbeys Of Touraine • Honore de Balzac

... Marjoram!" (Sang an old dame standing on the kerb); "You may hear a thousand ballads, You may pick a thousand salads, Ere you light on such another herb. ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Volume 152, March 21, 1917 • Various

... minutes without uttering a cry. He generally falls backwards and sometimes succumbs to the fever which ensues; hence as soon as the ordeal is over the women are prodigal of their attentions to him, and rub the swollen arm with a particular kind of herb.[149] Ordeals of this sort appear to be in vogue among the Indians of the Rio Negro as well as of the Amazon.[150] Among the Rucuyennes, a tribe of Indians in the north of Brazil, on the borders of Guiana, young men who are candidates for marriage ...
— Balder The Beautiful, Vol. I. • Sir James George Frazer

... then, somewhat the Talleyrand type? How many distinguished men have been fat. Napoleon, Renan, Gibbon, Dr. Johnson—" she turned her sheet as she mildly brought out the desultory list. "And all seem to end in n, do they not? I am glad that I asked Mr. Drew. He flavours the dish like an aromatic herb; and what a success he has been; hein? But he is the type of personal success. ...
— Tante • Anne Douglas Sedgwick

... necessities, having seed in itself according to its likeness, when from feeling of our infirmity, we compassionate so as to relieve the needy; helping them, as we would be helped; if we were in like need; not only in things easy, as in herb yielding seed, but also in the protection of our assistance, with our best strength, like the tree yielding fruit: that is, well-doing in rescuing him that suffers wrong, from the hand of the powerful, and giving him the shelter of protection, by the mighty ...
— The Confessions of Saint Augustine • Saint Augustine

... and rushes covered it. Thorn bushes were there, too, but not so tall; they were hung with lichen. Besides the flags and reeds, vast quantities of the tallest cow-parsnips or "gicks" rose five or six feet high, and the willow herb with its stout stem, almost as woody as a shrub, ...
— After London - Wild England • Richard Jefferies

... (?) a malt liquor in which the herb of this name was infused, or a person who sold the ...
— Epicoene - Or, The Silent Woman • Ben Jonson

... morn, the day was brief, Loose on the cherry hung the crimson leaf; The dew dwelt ever on the herb; the woods Roar'd with strong blasts, with mighty showers the floods: All green was vanish'd, save of pine and yew, That still displayed their melancholy hue; Save the green holly with its berries red, And the green moss that ...
— Crabbe, (George) - English Men of Letters Series • Alfred Ainger

... herb of healing, A balsam and a sign, Flower of a heart whose trouble Must have been worse ...
— Last Poems • A. E. Housman

... than Irving in the heraldry of genius: he has more quarterings in his shield. Not only does he excel the other in brief essay, depending only on endogenous forces, whereas Irving is always adorning his paragraphs with that herb-o'-grace, quotation, but he also greatly surpasses him in the construction of his stories; and finally, his psychological analysis and symbolic imagination place him beyond rivalry. It is a brilliant instance of the more ideal ...
— A Study Of Hawthorne • George Parsons Lathrop

... Herb-Soup, the Foundation. Hops. Hare, to pot. Herbs, to dry. Hare coursed, how to keep. Ditto hunted, to dress. Ditto the Pudding for it. Ditto to roast. Hare, to stew. ...
— The Country Housewife and Lady's Director - In the Management of a House, and the Delights and Profits of a Farm • Richard Bradley

... all things upon earth that breathe and grow A herb most bruised is woman. We must pay Our store of gold, hoarded for that one day To buy us some man's love, and lo, they bring A master of our flesh. There comes the sting Of the whole shame, and then the jeopardy For good or ill, what shall that ...
— The Truth About Woman • C. Gasquoine Hartley

... Luciano fell hungrily upon dishes of herb-flavoured cutlets, and Neapolitan maccaroni, green figs, green and red slices of melon, chocolate, and a dry red Florentine wine. The countess let them eat, and then gave her son a letter that been delivered at ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... our God did. And what did He say to poor Adam? "Cursed be the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life; thorns and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field, and in the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread." Did He say one word calculated to make him a better man? Did He put in the horizon of the future one star of hope? Let us be honest, and see what this ...
— Lectures of Col. R. G. Ingersoll, Volume I • Robert Green Ingersoll

... Tien-sing, we observed several large fields cultivated with a vegetable called by the Chinese the Pe-tsai, or white herb, apparently a species of Brassica or cole; though insipid in its taste, being not unlike that of the cos-lettuce, it is held in preference to all other vegetables; and the capital is most abundantly supplied with it in the summer ...
— Travels in China, Containing Descriptions, Observations, and Comparisons, Made and Collected in the Course of a Short Residence at the Imperial Palace of Yuen-Min-Yuen, and on a Subsequent Journey thr • John Barrow

... word. Arbour certainly owes its modern spelling to Lat. arbor, a tree, but it represents also Mid. Eng. herbere, erbere, which comes, through French, from Lat. *herbarium. But this can only mean herb-garden, so that the sense development of the word must have been affected by harbour, properly "army-shelter," ultimately identical with Fr. auberge (p. 164). When ...
— The Romance of Words (4th ed.) • Ernest Weekley

... he happened to be one of a gang of robbers, he replied: "Shairan tempted me: the Khan sent me into Kemek, a neighbouring village, with a letter to the famous Hakim (Doctor) Ibrahim, for a certain herb, which they say removes every ailment, as easily as if it were brushed away with the hand. To my sorrow, Shermadan met me in the way! He teazed me, saying, 'Come with me, and let us rob on the road. An Armenian is coming from Kouba with money.' My young heart could not resist this ... oh, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Vol. 53, No. 331, May, 1843 • Various

... Yes, and often has the Witch Sought to tear it from its niche; But to thwart her cruel will The wise God renews it still. Though it grows in soil perverse, Heaven hath been its jealous nurse, And a flower of snowy mark Springs from root and sheathing dark; Kingly safeguard, only herb That can brutish passion curb! Some do think its name should be ...
— Modern Prose And Poetry; For Secondary Schools - Edited With Notes, Study Helps, And Reading Lists • Various

... at last," muttered he, as he flung himself to the ground, and commenced gathering the stalks of a small herb that grew plentifully about. It was an annual, with leaves very much of the size and shape of young garden box-wood, but of a much brighter green. Of course we all knew well enough what it was, for there is not a village "common" in the Western United States that is not ...
— The Hunters' Feast - Conversations Around the Camp Fire • Mayne Reid

... wild beasts upon her; upon which they made a very mournful outcry; and some of them scattered spikenard, others cassia, others amomus (a sort of spikenard, or the herb of Jerusalem, or ladies rose), others ointment; so that the quantity of ointment was large, in proportion to the number of people; and upon this all the beasts lay as though they had been fast asleep, and did ...
— The Forbidden Gospels and Epistles, Complete • Archbishop Wake

... untrammelled, For the danger is an infant Without strength to hurt or harm him. Be it that those wretched Christians Have bewitched him, disenchant him, Since you have the power; for Nature With such careful forethought acteth, That an antidotal herb She for every poison planteth. And if, finally, your wish Is that he this fatal sadness Should forget, and wholly change it To a happier state and gladder, Get him married: for remember Nothing is so well adapted ...
— The Two Lovers of Heaven: Chrysanthus and Daria - A Drama of Early Christian Rome • Pedro Calderon de la Barca

... this delightful Herb whose tender Green Fledges the River's Lip on which we lean— Ah, lean upon it lightly! for who knows From what once lovely Lip it ...
— Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam • Omar Khayyam

... discovered what it is pleased to call an order of development on earth—tender grass, herb, tree; moving creatures that have life in the waters; bird, reptile, beast, cattle, man. The Bible gives the same order ages before, and calls ...
— Recreations in Astronomy - With Directions for Practical Experiments and Telescopic Work • Henry Warren

... that connected the Chinese herb so closely with the struggle of principle in America. To this day, while the issues are obscured in the mind of the average American, he remembers the tax on tea, and that his ancestors would not pay it. Picturesque tales of ladies' associations depriving themselves of ...
— The Siege of Boston • Allen French

... East and westward, and the dell their slopes enfold Basks in purple, glows in green, exults in gold Glens that know the dove and fells that hear the lark Fill with joy the rapturous island, as an ark Full of spicery wrought from herb and flower and tree. None would dream that grief even here may disembark On the wrathful woful ...
— A Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... is the wife of the desert and of despair, bred up in hate and vengeance, and lo! all these innocent things agree to smile upon her! The trees, soothed by the south wind, pay her gentle homage. Each herb of the field, with its own special virtue of scent, or remedy, or poison—very often the three things are one—offers itself to her, ...
— La Sorciere: The Witch of the Middle Ages • Jules Michelet

... se, will cure invalids of any class, they are certainly worthless in this class of patients. The whole materia medica affords no root, herb, extract, or compound that alone will cure a person suffering from emissions. Thousands of unfortunates have been ruined by long-continued drugging. One physician will purge and salivate the patient. Another will dose him with phosphorus, quinine, or ergot. Another ...
— Plain Facts for Old and Young • John Harvey Kellogg

... it dry medicaments. And it is evident that this is done by him in a technical fashion. Eurypalus, who is wounded in the thigh, first treats it with a sharp knife, then he washes it with clear water; afterward to diminish the pain, he employs an herb. For there are many in existence that heal wounds. He knew this, too, that bitter things are suitable; for to dry up wounds requires exsiccation. After Patroclus has applied the healing art, he did not go away immediately, but ...
— Essays and Miscellanies - The Complete Works Volume 3 • Plutarch

... unspotted cloth; nor any cow, her horns tipped with rings of brass, and her neck garlanded with flowers, to lead thee, holding by her tail, through pleasant paths to the land of Yama! May no Purohita come to strew thy bier with the holy herb, nor any next of kin be near to whisper ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II, No. 8, June 1858 • Various

... calculate the cost of an overture? What melody does Tityrus meditate on his tenderly spiral pipe? The leaden seed of it, broadcast, true conical "Dents de Lion" seed—needing less allowance for the wind than is usual with that kind of herb—what crop are you likely to have of it? Suppose, instead of this volunteer marching and countermarching, you were to do a little volunteer ploughing and counter-ploughing? It is more difficult to do it straight: the dust of the earth, so ...
— The Crown of Wild Olive • John Ruskin

... kind of broth for weakly persons may be made as follows. Boil two pounds of loin of mutton, with a large handful of chervil, in two quarts of water, till reduced to one. Any other herb or roots may be added. Remove part of the fat, and take half a pint three or four times a day. If a broth is wanted to be made quickly, take a bone or two of a neck or loin of mutton, pare off the fat and the skin, set it on the fire in a small tin saucepan that has a cover, with ...
— The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, • Mary Eaton

... and to make him straightway their master-cook. This was precisely the elevated point of trust to which Ruus had aspired, since his entrance into the monastery was urged by the resolution to work out its destruction. The victuals of the friars, made savoury by every herb and spice Ruus could take from the abundant hand of Nature, or steal from the art of man, were luscious to the extreme of taste; and, delivering themselves up to the enjoyment of all earth's good things, the friars allowed fasting and prayer ...
— A Yacht Voyage to Norway, Denmark, and Sweden - 2nd edition • W. A. Ross

... But it is not for him whose soul is dark, whose designs are selfish, whose affections are dead, or whose thoughts are vain, to say with the son of Amram, "My doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall distil as the dew; as the small rain upon the tender herb, and as the showers upon the grass."—Deut., xxxii, 2. It is not for him to exhibit the true excellency of speech, because he cannot feel its power. It is not for him, whatever be the theme, to convince the judgement with deductions of reason, to fire the imagination with glowing imagery, or win ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... a great deal since then," pleaded Mrs. Witton "and if you do not want any new doctors, isn't there something I can do for you? If you will tell me how you feel, it may be that some sort of herb tea—or a mustard plaster—" ...
— The Girl at Cobhurst • Frank Richard Stockton

... court. That shall I never, said Bagdemagus, till men speak of me great worship, and that I be worthy to be a knight of the Round Table. And so he rode forth, and there by the way he found a branch of an holy herb that was the sign of the Sangreal, and no knight found such tokens but ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... a young man who wished the love of women went to him and asked for a love potion. The old man said, "Turn me over." The young man turned the conjurer over and found under him an herb. The old man told him he must not give this away or throw it away. The young man went home to his wigwam. On his return home all the women of the place followed him, everywhere and at all times. He longed to be alone, and did not like to have the women so ...
— Contribution to Passamaquoddy Folk-Lore • J. Walter Fewkes

... box of matches," she said, "and here is the water and herb tea, in reach of your arm. You're not ...
— The Young Franc Tireurs - And Their Adventures in the Franco-Prussian War • G. A. Henty

... how Charles did cry! But it was of no use. He had better not have taken her away from Giles, for he did not know what to feed her with, and had given her among the greens he had gathered a herb called hemlock, which is poisonous and will kill whatever eats of it; and it ...
— Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12) - Classic Tales And Old-Fashioned Stories • Various

... a certain kind of herb whereof in summer they make a great provision for all the year, making great account of it, and only men use it; and first they cause it to be dried in the sun, then wear it about their necks wrapped in a little beast's skin made like a bag, together with a hollow piece of stone or wood ...
— Pioneers in Canada • Sir Harry Johnston

... many, very many more who are wholly unacquainted with the peculiar and interesting structure of this fruit and its allies—the raspberry, blackberry, dewberry, and their congeners. The plant which bears the strawberry, whether the wild or garden species, is an herb with three-partite leaves, notched at the edge with a pair of largo membraneous stipules at their base. When growing, this plant throws out two kinds of shoots—one called runners, which lie prostrate on the ground, and end in a tuft of leaves—these root into the soil, and then ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 462 - Volume 18, New Series, November 6, 1852 • Various

... through Arabia, keeping the Euphrates on the 1 right, five desert stages—thirty-five parasangs. In this region the ground was one long level plain, stretching far and wide like the sea, full of absinth; whilst all the other vegetation, whether wood or reed, was sweet scented like spice or sweet herb; there were no trees; but there was wild game of all kinds—wild asses in greatest abundance, with plenty of ostriches; besides these, there were bustards and antelopes. These creatures were occasionally ...
— Anabasis • Xenophon

... absurd and proud custom of walking in public in boots, and the ridiculous one of wearing the hair long;* - statutes, moreover, which demanded of him to refrain from all taverns, wine-shops, and houses in which they sold wine or any other drink, and the herb called nicotiana or "tobacco"; not to hunt wild beasts with dogs or snares or nets; not to carry cross-bows or other "bombarding" weapons, or keep hawks for fowling; not to frequent theatres or the strifes of gladiators; and only to carry a bow and arrows for the sake of honest recreation; ...
— The Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green • Cuthbert Bede

... almost verbatim et literatim from Cheyne's list in The English Malady (1733), his recommendation (Section VIII) of "Spleen-Wort" as the best medicine for the hypochondriac patient is not. Since Hill devotes so much space to the virtues of this herb and concludes his work extolling this plant, a word should be said about it. Throughout his life he was an active botanist. Apothecary, physician, and writer though he was, it was ultimately botany that was his ruling passion, as is made abundantly clear in ...
— Hypochondriasis - A Practical Treatise (1766) • John Hill

... I sent Friday to the shore, to get a sort of herb that grew there. I soon heard him cry out to me, "O grief! O bad! O bad! O out there boats, one, two, three!" "Keep a stout heart," said I, to cheer him. The poor man shook with fear; for he thought that the men who brought him here, had now come ...
— Robinson Crusoe - In Words of One Syllable • Mary Godolphin

... bringing in, in addition to the customary herb-breakfast, an ill-cooked rabbit. Montgomery followed him. His roving eye caught the position of my ...
— The Island of Doctor Moreau • H. G. Wells

... the song of the nightingale, from amidst one of the neighbouring copses, which studded the ground towards the chase of Marybone, came soft and distant on the serene air. The balm and freshness of spring were felt in the dews, in the skies, in the sweet breath of young herb and leaf; through the calm of ever-watchful nature, it seemed as if you might mark, distinct and visible, minute after minute, the blessed growth ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... hath so many good virtues, and is so beneficial to mankinde." Sir James Smith as quaintly observes, "the malice of the devil has unhappily been so successful, that no virtue can now be found in the remainder of the root or herb."— Knowledge for the People. ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume 19, No. 533, Saturday, February 11, 1832. • Various

... resembling the long horns of Lobsters, each of whose stems or quills, DD, were brisled or brushed with multitudes of small stiff hairs, issuing out every way from the several joints, like the strings or sproutings of the herb Horse-tail, which is oft observ'd to grow among Corn, and for the whole shape, it does very much resemble those brushy Vegetables; besides these, there are two other jointed and brisled horns, or feelers, EE, in the forepart of the head, and a proboscis, F, underneath, which ...
— Micrographia • Robert Hooke

... I suppose it will be ages before we get a glimpse of her again," Grace complained, impatient for the promised excitement. "I asked the druggist if he knew her, and he laughed sort of queer, and said someone in the family must be a root and herb fiend, for she bought the queerest old dried roots and foreign herbs, that no one else ever called for. They even had to send to New York to get some of her orders filled. What do you suppose anyone wants old dried up ...
— The Girl Scouts at Bellaire - Or Maid Mary's Awakening • Lilian C. McNamara Garis

... mystery night and day; Still wanders where the sacred spring is hidden; Yet, would he take the seal from the forbidden, Then must he work and watch as well as pray! How work? How watch? Beside him—in his way,— Springs without check the flow'r by whose choice spell,— More potent than "herb moly,"—he can tell Where the stream rises, and the waters play!— Ah! spirits call'd avail not! On his eyes, Sealed up with stubborn ...
— Southern Literature From 1579-1895 • Louise Manly

... was that of the contented Shepherd Boy in the Valley of Humiliation, singing his cheerful songs, and wearing "the herb called Heart's Ease in his bosom"; but all the glorious ups and downs of the "Progress" I would gladly have shared with Christiana and her children, never desiring to turn aside into any "By-Path Meadow" while ...
— A New England Girlhood • Lucy Larcom

... paper discovered, and therewith was eloquence made possible. Paper, so smooth and so continuous, the snowy entrails of a green herb; paper which can be spread out to such a vast extent, and yet be folded up into such a little space; paper, on whose white expanse the black characters look beautiful; paper which keeps the sweet harvest of the mind, and restores it to the reader ...
— The Letters of Cassiodorus - Being A Condensed Translation Of The Variae Epistolae Of - Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus Senator • Cassiodorus (AKA Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus Senator)

... YERBA BUENA do, sir?" responded the youth gravely. "It's the old Spanish title of the first settlement here. It comes from the name that Father Junipero Serra gave to the pretty little vine that grows wild over the sandhills, and means 'good herb.' He called it 'A balm for ...
— A Ward of the Golden Gate • Bret Harte

... so poor and lanky. And deir hosses was in de same fix. Men and hosses had know'd plenty till dat Sherman come along, but most of dem never know'd plenty no more. De men got over it better dan de hosses. Women folks cared for de men. Dey brewed tea from sage leaves, sassafras root and other herb teas. Nobody never had no money to fetch no medicine from de towns wid, so dey made liniments and salves from de things dat grow'd around about in de woods ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves • Works Projects Administration

... delights, natures, inclinations, continuance of time, as they are simple or mixed with other diseases, as the causes are divers, so must the signs be, almost infinite, Altomarus cap. 7, art. med. And as wine produceth divers effects, or that herb Tortocolla in [2454]Laurentius, "which makes some laugh, some weep, some sleep, some dance, some sing, some howl, some drink," &c. so doth this our melancholy humour work several ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... his horse and bore him secretly to the women's rooms. There Iseult told her mother the tale and left the hero with her, and as the Queen unharnessed him, the dragon's tongue fell from his boot of steel. Then, the Queen of Ireland revived him by the virtue of an herb and said: ...
— The Romance Of Tristan And Iseult • M. Joseph Bedier

... such a painfully familiar and unheroic episode as an attack of colic. It makes little difference whether the attack is due to the swallowing of some mineral poison, like lead or arsenic, or the irritating juice of some poisonous plant or herb, or to the every-day accident of including in the menu some article of diet which was beginning to spoil or decay, and which contained the bacteria of putrefaction or their poisonous products. The reaction of defense is practically the same, varying only with ...
— Preventable Diseases • Woods Hutchinson

... tell you, when you ask me softly and without threats, O King? See"—and Zikali took up some of the twisted roots—"these are the roots of a certain poisonous herb that blooms at night on the tops of mountains, and woe be to the ox that eats thereof. They have been boiled in gall and blood, and ill will befall the hut in which they are hidden by one who can speak the words of power. This is the bone ...
— Child of Storm • H. Rider Haggard

... lad, who had been accused of bewitching the sultan's brother, were found with their arms tied behind them, writhing in torture on their faces. No sympathy was shown them from the jeering crowd. The lad at last cried out: "Take me to the forest; I know a herb remedy." He was allowed to go, while the woman was kept in the stocks near the sick patient. The lad was put to death, and Captain Grant suspected, tortured before a fire. Another man, for a crime in the sultan's harem, was stripped, tied ...
— Great African Travellers - From Mungo Park to Livingstone and Stanley • W.H.G. Kingston

... that Oxley could not take into his calculations—for he did not know its power—the sure, if gradual change wrought by stocking. Under the ceaseless tread of myriad hoofs, the loose, open soil was to become firm and hard, whilst fresh growths of herb and grass followed the footsteps of the invading herds. The shaking bogs and morasses were to become solidified, and the waters that permeated them to retreat into well defined chains of ponds and ...
— The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888 • Ernest Favenc

... sheer like a wall. On the other side of it was a space the size of an amphitheatre, a large part of it spread with soft green grass, like a carpet, and the rest of the floor scattered with low shrubs and big tussocks. Amongst them was a herb giving out a fragrance, when the feet crushed it, like that of wild thyme. The whole air seemed filled with a blend of ...
— Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land • Rosa Praed

... forms of folk stories relates to the wanderings of a hero in distant regions. He may set forth in search of a fair lady who has been taken captive, or to obtain a magic herb or stone to relieve a sufferer, to cure diseases, and to prolong life. Invariably he is a slayer of dragons and other monsters. A friendly spirit, or a group of spirits, may assist the hero, who acts according ...
— Myths of Babylonia and Assyria • Donald A. Mackenzie

... Persian, Roman, Arabian, and Syrian; and he was skilled in astronomy and in leechcraft, the theorick as well as the practick; he was experienced in all that healeth and that hurteth the body; conversant with the virtues of every plant, grass and herb, and their benefit and bane; and he understood philosophy and had compassed the whole range of medical science and other branches of the knowledge tree. Now this physician passed but few days in the city, ere he heard of the King's malady and all his bodily sufferings through the leprosy with which ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... them on all sides. Be sure they are dry and not moist when you cut or pick them, and free them from dirt and decayed leaves. After they are entirely dried out, put them in paper bags upon which you have written the name of the herb and the date of tying it up. Hang them where the air is dry and there is no chance ...
— Practical Suggestions for Mother and Housewife • Marion Mills Miller

... and dogs, And more unpitying men, the garden seeks, Urged on by fearless want. The bleating kind. Eye the bleak heaven, and next the glistening earth, With looks of dumb despair; then, sad dispersed, Dig for the withered herb through heaps of snow ...
— McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... as though they thought that mirth would come for asking; others, grown brutal by being caged, made up in noise what they lacked in peace. How comfortless they seemed! The only solace that the eye could trace was the odious herb, tobacco! ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, November 27, 1841 • Various

... hacked the serpent in pieces, and the blood flowed out and reddened the river. But when he came to the middle tail his sabre was broken, and when he searched he found that within the tail was a great sword which he took out. And this is the herb-quelling-great-sword. ...
— Japan • David Murray

... crossed his path. The priests basking in the warmth were like four great black cats. It was indeed a pleasant spot, and contentment oozed into one by every pore. The canon rolled himself another cigarette, smiling as he inhaled the first sweet whiffs; and one could not but think the sovereign herb must greatly ease the journey along the steep and narrow way which leads to Paradise. The smoke rose into the air lazily, and the old cleric paused now and again to look at it, the little smile of self-satisfaction ...
— The Land of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches and Impressions in Andalusia • William Somerset Maugham

... the sun. We found it was a cloud of locusts raised about twenty or thirty fathoms from the ground, and covering an extent of several leagues; at length a shower of these insects descended, and after devouring every green herb, while they rested, again resumed their flight. This cloud was brought by a strong east-wind, and was all the morning in passing over the adjacent country." (Voyage ...
— Zoonomia, Vol. I - Or, the Laws of Organic Life • Erasmus Darwin

... practice of using tobacco, is a sufficient argument to induce all decent people to wage war against it. Stage coaches, rail cars, steamboats, public houses, courts of justice, halls of legislation, and the temples of God, are all defiled by the loathsome consumers of this dirty, Indian herb. For the sake of decency, for the honor of humanity, let the land be purified from this ...
— A Disquisition on the Evils of Using Tobacco - and the Necessity of Immediate and Entire Reformation • Orin Fowler

... thee conversing I forget all time, All seasons, and their change,—all please alike. Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glist'ring with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful ev'ning mild; then silent night With this her solemn bird and this fair moon, And these the ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... besides being ornamental and valuable for timber, produces a most bee-inviting flower. Vetch, clover, and most of the legumes and mints are valuable plants to furnish pasture for bees. Catnip may be cultivated for the bees and sold as an herb as well. ...
— Agriculture for Beginners - Revised Edition • Charles William Burkett

... Beat the Herb Calaminth with Turpentine, and yellow Wax to a Salve, and apply it. To expel the inward Poyson, give the ...
— The School of Recreation (1696 edition) • Robert Howlett

... for three or four hours, he is apt to do justice to a meal, especially if his appetite is healthy. I think I astonished the governor by the dexterous way in which I managed to consume eleven cups of his aromatic concoction of an Assam herb, and the easy effortless style with which I demolished his high tower of "slap jacks," that but a minute or so smoked hotly under ...
— How I Found Livingstone • Sir Henry M. Stanley

... seeking, about that time, for such objects as might produce a profit in China, and hearing of the general use, there, of a beverage from a plant of the country, endeavoured to introduce the use of the European herb, sage, amongst the Chinese, for a similar purpose, accepting, in return, the Chinese tea, which they brought to Europe. The European herb did not continue long in use in China, but the consumption of tea has been gradually increasing in Europe ever since. The annual public ...
— Domestic pleasures - or, the happy fire-side • F. B. Vaux

... up, his godfather one day appeared and bade him go with him. He led him forth into a forest, and showed him a herb which grew there, and said, "Now shalt thou receive thy godfather's present. I make thee a celebrated physician. When thou art called to a patient, I will always appear to thee. If I stand by the head of the sick man, thou mayst say ...
— Household Tales by Brothers Grimm • Grimm Brothers

... all owned around here!" she laughed. "And they use herb doctors or homeopaths. No, we should starve in the midst of harvests. There is only one thing to do, to go back where we can earn a ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... profession had gone to the army, and the Tory physician had departed to the British lines. But, as is well known, the women in the early days of New Jersey were often obliged to be physicians; and among the good housewives of Burlington, who knew all about herb teas, homemade plasters, and potions, Mrs. Morris held a high position. The sick Continentals were told that she was just as good as a doctor, and, besides, was a very kind woman, always ready to help the ...
— The Junior Classics • Various

... where you have been racing all the day, to get your head so disordered," said Mistress Mabel; and she despatched Mary to her store closet for some herb tea for Harry ...
— Hayslope Grange - A Tale of the Civil War • Emma Leslie

... they left modern GALLANTRY and the POINT OF HONOUR, which still maintain their influence, and are the genuine offspring of those ancient affectations. [FN [f] In all legal single combats, it was part of the champion's oath, that he carried not about him any herb, spell, or enchantment, by which he might procure victory. Dugd. Orig. ...
— The History of England, Volume I • David Hume

... Bottles Hydrox Chemical Company Hygeia Nursing Bottles I-De-Lite Irondequoit Port Wine Jetum Jucket's (Dr.) Salve Karith Kellogg's Asthma Remedy Knickerbocker Spraybrushes Kondon's Catarrhal Jelly Kumyss, Arend-Adamick Lemke's (Dr.) Golden Electric Liniment Lemke's (Dr.) Laxative Herb Tea Lemke's (Dr.) St. Johannis Drops Leslie Safety Razors Louisenbad Reduction Salt Lune de Miel Perfume "Lustr-ite" Toilet Specialties Luxtone Toilet Preparations Mando, Depilatory Manicure Goods Mares Cough Balsam Martel's (Dr.) Female Pills Marvel Syringes Mayr's ...
— The Handy Cyclopedia of Things Worth Knowing - A Manual of Ready Reference • Joseph Triemens

... that Near East one packed in pine, suggesting the well-saged dressing of a turkey. A round mouthful of luscious mellowness, with a bouquet—a snapping reminder to the nose. And there's just a soupcon of new-mown hay above the green freckles of herb to delight the eye and set the fancy free. So this is the veritable vert, green cheese—the moon is made of it! Vert veritable. A general favorite with everybody who ever tasted it, ...
— The Complete Book of Cheese • Robert Carlton Brown

... Without the aid of our wealth, they could neither furnish forth their hosts in war, nor their triumphs in peace, and the gold which we lend them returns with increase to our coffers. We are like the herb which flourisheth most when it is most trampled on. Even this day's pageant had not proceeded without the consent of the despised Jew, who ...
— Ivanhoe - A Romance • Walter Scott

... fish, and kils and spoils much more: And I can tell you, that he can smel a fish in the water one hundred yards from him (Gesner sayes, much farther) and that his stones are good against the Falling-sickness: and that there is an herb Benione, which being hung in a linen cloth near a Fish Pond, or any haunt that he uses, makes him to avoid the place, which proves he can smell both by water and land. And thus much for my knowledg of the Otter, which you may now see above water at vent, and the dogs close ...
— The Compleat Angler - Facsimile of the First Edition • Izaak Walton

... strange homage to a love that a few hours ago had no friend in all the daylight, a fearful bliss beneath the secret moon? But yesterday a stupid old nurse, a herb-gathering friar, a rascally apothecary, had been their only friends, and now was all the world come ...
— Prose Fancies (Second Series) • Richard Le Gallienne

... world draws almost the whole of its substance. While we are inspiring the invisible fluid, and with every breath renewing the ruddy currents of the heart and sending them glowing with warmth and vitality to all the extremities of the frame, every leaf in the mighty forest, and every herb, and flower, and blade of grass on the surface of the whole earth, is maintaining a similar commerce with the air, drawing from its boundless stores of carbon, piling up cell upon cell and adding fibre to fibre, until trunk, and branch, and stem, and leaf, with all the ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 2, August, 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... spurge, which plucked at the bottom are a purgative and plucked at the top, an emetic. He cured sore throat by means of the vegetable excrescence called Jew's ear. He knew the rush which cures the ox and the mint which cures the horse. He was well acquainted with the beauties and virtues of the herb mandragora, which, as every one knows, is of both sexes. He had many recipes. He cured burns with the salamander wool, of which, according to Pliny, Nero had a napkin. Ursus possessed a retort and a flask; he effected transmutations; he sold panaceas. ...
— The Man Who Laughs • Victor Hugo

... a night in early spring as Mr. Tiralla staggered home. A long time would elapse before the lilac-bushes near the dilapidated railings in the weed-grown herb garden would bloom; there was still no sign of buds on the trees, the plain was still bare and wintry-looking. But something was already moving deep down in the earth. The furrows, through which Mr. Tiralla tramped as he crossed ...
— Absolution • Clara Viebig

... crystal. Above Teign's shrunken current extended oak and ash, while her banks bore splendid concourse of the wild water-loving dwellers in that happy valley. Meadowsweet nodded creamy crests; hemlock and fool's parsley and seeding willow-herb crowded together beneath far-scattered filigree of honeysuckles and brambles with berries, some ripe, some red; while the scarlet corals of briar and white bryony gemmed every riotous trailing thicket, dene, and dingle along the river's brink; and in the grassy spaces ...
— Children of the Mist • Eden Phillpotts

... the world was before us, and seldom has it shone out beneath the gaze of youth and inexperience more winningly than it did under the influence of that delicious day. The rain of the preceding night, and of the early part of the morning, had given to herb and tree a fresher and a fairer green. The fallows wore no longer a parched-up and dust-like hue, and the rivulets, swollen but not polluted, retained their lucid character as they rolled on their way. ...
— Germany, Bohemia, and Hungary, Visited in 1837. Vol. II • G. R. Gleig

... in the "Odyssey." Ulysses having landed on her isle, she administered a potion to him and his companions, which turned them into swine, while the effect of it on himself was counteracted by the use of the herb moly, provided for him by Hermes against sorcery; she detained him with her for years, and disenchanted his companions on ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... at whose shrine in Ise it is subsequently found and given to the famous warrior, Yamato-dake, when he is setting out on his expedition against the Kumaso of the north. The sword is known as the "Herb-queller." Susanoo then builds for himself and Lady Wonderful a palace at Suga in Izumo, and composes a celebrated verse of Japanese poetry.* Sixth in descent from the offspring of this union is the "Kami of the great ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... colour, an almost uniform scheme of greyish green, is a curious contrast to the vivid blues and yellows of the period which preceded it, and examples of which may be seen in the choir of Canterbury. The pattern is an elaborate but restrained arrangement of the foliage of the Planta Benedicta (herb benet). The plain border surrounding the Early English glass was inserted in 1715. At the foot of the central light is a panel of Norman glass, the subject of which is either the dream of Jacob, or Daniel in ...
— The Cathedral Church of York - Bell's Cathedrals: A Description of Its Fabric and A Brief - History of the Archi-Episcopal See • A. Clutton-Brock

... Purple Willow-herb bent over To her shadow fair; Meadow-sweet, in feathery clusters, Perfumed all the air; Silver-weed was there, And in one calm, grassy spot, ...
— Legends and Lyrics: Second Series • Adelaide Anne Procter

... one with Nature, where is heard His voice in all her music, from the moan Of thunder to the song of night's sweet bird; He is a presence to be felt and known, In darkness and in light, from herb and stone, Spreading itself where'er that Power move, Which has withdrawn his being to its own; Which wields the world with never-wearied love, Sustains it from beneath, and ...
— Percy Bysshe Shelley as a Philosopher and Reformer • Charles Sotheran

... indirections, 'tis well to know that there is method in it, a fixed scale, and rank above rank in the phantasms. We begin low with coarse masks, and rise to the most subtle and beautiful. The red men told Columbus, "they had an herb which took away fatigue"; but he found the illusion of "arriving from the east at the Indies" more composing to his lofty spirit than any tobacco. Is not our faith in the impenetrability of matter ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. I, No. 1, Nov. 1857 • Various

... natural conversational powers, which called out hers. Where? In the street, in the first place, where I was so fortunate as to meet her just as she had dropped one of a number of parcels of herb medicine she was carrying. I had the pleasure of picking it up for her, and of relieving her of some of her load. Thus I found out where she lived, and then took it upon myself to call again; but she hasn't seemed to like me from ...
— The Brother Clerks - A Tale of New-Orleans • Xariffa

... Traveller! rest. This lonely yew-tree stands Far from all human dwelling: what if here No sparkling rivulet spread the verdant herb; What if these barren boughs the bee not loves; Yet, if the wind breathe soft, the curling waves, That break against the shore, shall lull thy mind By one soft impulse ...
— Lyrical Ballads 1798 • Wordsworth and Coleridge

... are not active enough to get out of it, and tearing the whips out of their hands and breaking them. At these spectacles, and everywhere else, the English are constantly smoking tobacco; and in this manner—they have pipes on purpose made of clay, into the farther end of which they put the herb, so dry that it may be rubbed into powder, and putting fire to it, they draw the smoke into their mouths, which they puff out again through their nostrils like funnels, along with it plenty of phlegm and defluxion from the head. In these theatres, fruits, such as ...
— Travels in England and Fragmenta Regalia • Paul Hentzner and Sir Robert Naunton

... potatoes during the summer became our chief, and often for months, our only fare. As to tea and sugar, they were luxuries we could not think of, although I missed the tea very much; we rang the changes upon peppermint and sage, taking the one herb at our breakfast, the other at our tea, until I found an excellent substitute for both in the root of ...
— Roughing it in the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... hind on the moor calves and abandons, For the grass has not come. On the bare heights stand the wild asses, Gasping for air With glazen eyes— Herb there ...
— Jeremiah • George Adam Smith

... is a tribe cultivating this herb (tobacco), in which they carry on an extensive traffic with the other tribes. They have large towns, fortified with wood, and they plant ...
— Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, Vol. 1 • Samuel de Champlain

... working on farm near La Plata, he decided to run away as he had done on several previous occasions. He was known by some as the herb doctor and healer. He would not be punished on any condition nor would he work unless he was paid something. It was said that he would save money and give it to people who wanted to run away. He was charged with aiding a girl to flee. He was to be whipped by the sheriff ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - From Interviews with Former Slaves - Maryland Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... scholiast says fruit may be eaten with impunity in great quantities if care is taken to drink a decoction of this herb afterwards. ...
— Peace • Aristophanes

... decree that they should take with them flint stones of their own and vervain of their own; that the Roman praetor should command them to strike the league, and that they should demand of him herbs. The description of herb usually given to the heralds is taken from the Capitol. Thus the Carthaginians being allowed to depart from Rome, when they had gone into Africa to Scipio concluded the peace on the terms before mentioned. They delivered up their men-of-war, their ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 2 • Various

... covering a matter of perhaps five miles a day, since sometimes the country was open and we crossed it with speed. Yet although our dangers were so many, strangely enough, during all this time, even in that heat neither of us fell sick, as I think because of the herb which Kari carried in his bag, that I found was named Coca, whereof we obtained more as we went and ate from time to time. Nor did we ever really suffer from starvation, since when we were hungry we took more of this herb which supported us until we could find food. These mercies I set ...
— The Virgin of the Sun • H. R. Haggard

... think of nothing but his new knife, and well pleased was he to show it to his young companions, many of whom had never before seen so polished a piece of iron. In his herb-gatherings for his mother, too, how useful it was to him in cutting through the tough stalks of some of the plants and in digging up the roots; and what fine things it enabled him to cut and carve for his mother,—new comb for her flax ...
— The Young Emigrants; Madelaine Tube; The Boy and the Book; and - Crystal Palace • Susan Anne Livingston Ridley Sedgwick

... might indicate. Where they fail, brown brake fern fills the spaces between the brambles; and in a moist spot the bunches of rushes are composed half of dry stalks, and half of green. Stems of willow-herb, four feet high, still stand, and tiny long-tailed tits perch sideways on them. Above, on the bank, another species of willow-herb has died down to a short stalk, from which springs a living branch, and at its end is one pink flower. A dandelion is opening on ...
— The Life of the Fields • Richard Jefferies

... one must not give up observing it to the extreme limits of the horizon. Monotonous as it may appear to heedless minds, it is none the less infinitely varied for him who knows how to comprehend it. Its slightest changes charm the imagination of one who feels the poetry of the ocean. A marine herb which floats up and down on the waves, a branch of sargasso whose light track zebras, the surface of the waters, and end of a board, whose history he would wish to guess, he would need nothing more. Facing this infinite, the mind is no longer stopped by anything. Imagination runs riot. Each of ...
— Dick Sand - A Captain at Fifteen • Jules Verne

... to assist at this bed of botany, and with spectacles slipping off, and pushed on her nose continually, peered over each green thing, and named in Irish "every herb ...
— Tales & Novels, Vol. IX - [Contents: Harrington; Thoughts on Bores; Ormond] • Maria Edgeworth

... toiled up a steep incline, where he could feel beneath him neither moss nor herb. Now and then his feet brushed through a soft tuft of parsley fern: but soon even that sign of vegetation ceased; his feet only rasped over rough bare rock, and he was alone ...
— Two Years Ago, Volume II. • Charles Kingsley

... were at tea; the fragrant herb filled the room with its aroma; the brown toast was odoriferous; and everything pleasant and charming. After a temporary warming, I was shown to a room, where I changed my wet dress, an returning to the table, found that the ...
— Redburn. His First Voyage • Herman Melville

... of doctor was asked to come in, and every treatment had recourse to; and, though of such medicines as cinnamon, aconitum seeds, turtle shell, ophiopogon, Yue-chue herb, and the like, he took several tens of catties, he nevertheless experienced no change for the better; so that by the time the twelfth moon drew once again to an end, and spring returned, this illness ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book I • Cao Xueqin

... Moses; a praise-singing psalmist like David; a shrine of wisdom like Solomon; a chosen vessel for proclaiming truth like Paul the Apostle; a man full of grace and knowledge of the Holy Ghost like John; the root of a holy herb-garden towards the children of faith; a vine branch with fruitfulness; a sparkling fire, with power to heat and warm the sons of life, in founding and dispensing charity. A lion in strength and might; a dove in gentleness and humility. A serpent in wisdom ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various



Words linked to "Herb" :   beetleweed, fleabane, Cape periwinkle, Amaranthus spinosus, St. Barbara's herb, common devil's claw, Cichorium endivia, Asarum shuttleworthii, Eruca sativa, garden rocket, glasswort, Galega officinalis, Cichorium intybus, Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium, forget-me-not, herb garden, golden seal, false miterwort, Eruca vesicaria sativa, butterweed, globe thistle, golden groundsel, feverroot, bergenia, Emilia sagitta, herbaceous plant, acanthus, asparagus fern, chickweed, agrimonia, carrion flower, feabane mullet, Aspidistra elatio, American gentian, herb robert, black saltwort, ground cherry, chamois cress, Curcuma domestica, American columbo, alecost, healing herb, cultivated carrot, dog fennel, barrenwort, dog mercury, chamomile, Daucus carota sativa, Emilia coccinea, blessed thistle, halogeton, gipsywort, camomile, Anthyllis vulneraria, tracheophyte, Descurainia pinnata, bloodwort, California yellow bells, angelique, dragonhead, burnet bloodwort, Glycyrrhiza glabra, basil balm, gesneria, false gromwell, Dalmatia pyrethrum, Chinese forget-me-not, flame flower, elephant's-foot, foamflower, bible leaf, Dracocephalum parviflorum, herbal, goldcup, green gentian, edible asparagus, Australian pitcher plant, false nettle, herb mercury, catnip, ayapana, cultivated celery, aroid, apple of Peru, galaxy, Ensete ventricosum, Darmera peltata, bee balm, fumeroot, false mitrewort, devil's apples, Desmanthus ilinoensis, Dutchman's breeches, Eupatorium purpureum, button snakeroot, arugula, goldthread, clover, devil nettle, coltsfoot, benni, Apium graveolens rapaceum, herb Christopher, black salsify, goldenseal, Anthriscus sylvestris, flame-flower, Antennaria plantaginifolia, Eupatorium cannabinum, Berteroa incana, Anacyclus pyrethrum, Dicentra spectabilis, flax, Emmanthe penduliflora, Amsinckia intermedia, ginger, chicory plant, Diplotaxis muralis, Greek clover, columbo, catmint, cow parsnip, andryala, Guinea pepper, carrot, calamint, common cockscomb, benne, fetid horehound, Diplotaxis erucoides, costusroot, brinjal, deer's-ear, dittany, crucifer, cleome, Aframomum melegueta, asclepiad, astrantia, herb tea, blueweed, Gerardia virginica, Frasera speciosa, Celosia cristata, coleus, herb doctor, gumweed, golden ragwort, Eupatorium maculatum, balsamroot, asparagus pea, beaked parsley, draba, Galax urceolata, dog's mercury, bird's foot trefoil, Emilia javanica, American ginseng, butter-flower, Fagopyrum esculentum, Celosia argentea cristata, Eupatorium capillifolium, bladderpod, butterbur, Eranthis hyemalis, dwarf nipplewort, deadly nightshade, dagga, Eupatorium aya-pana, false bugbane, benny, Cephalotus follicularis, common amsinckia, Cacalia lutea, willowherb, fumitory, belladonna plant, bugleweed, eggplant bush, flame nettle, fines herbes, deer's-ears, Dalmatian pyrethrum, garden balm, coriander plant, cat's feet, Carthamus tinctorius, Abyssinian banana, Cakile maritima, bur reed, Antennaria dioica, cast-iron plant, barilla, foxglove, Celosia argentea, American pennyroyal, boneset, herb bennet, cat's foot, feverfew, Cacalia javanica, clammyweed, agrimony, bishop's cap, Cape dagga, Alexanders, Cynoglossum officinale, cayenne jasmine, Anemopsis californica, cumfrey, banana tree, goosefoot, anise plant, corn salad, bush pea, aspidistra, coreopsis, Dicentra cucullaria, Carum carvi, blue skullcap, Halogeton souda, fenugreek, carnivorous plant, ginseng, breadroot, Cuminum cyminum, Coptis groenlandica, cushion calamint, garden forget-me-not, Armoracia rusticana, gas plant, Anthriscus cereifolium, Gerardia pedicularia, cardamon, bird of paradise, aubergine, Apium graveolens, dock, blue pimpernel, devil's fig, esparcet, achillea, Cnidoscolus urens, climbing onion, false rue, boys-and-girls, Curcuma longa, bar-room plant, giant buttercup, Eupatorium rugosum, Amsinckia grandiflora, Anethum graveolens, arnica, Cynoglossum virginaticum, chaenactis, heal all, bellflower, Apium graveolens dulce, herb roberts, herbage, eggplant, celeriac, Cynoglossum amabile, Clinopodium vulgare, Alexander, gramineous plant, Eryngium aquaticum, Crambe maritima, breakstone, Dictamnus alba, hawkweed, astilbe, earthnut, beebalm, cockscomb, grains of paradise, Arnoseris minima, cardamom, Coriandrum sativum, celery root, false foxglove, Chamaemelum nobilis, Haastia pulvinaris, Eupatorium perfoliatum, geranium, dragon's head, cruciferous plant, buttercup, bog rhubarb, Collinsonia canadensis, goat's rue, camphor dune tansy, false saffron, alumroot, day lily, garden egg, Emilia flammea, Cassia marilandica, globeflower, Asparagus officinales, agueweed, Atropa belladonna, Anigozanthus manglesii, crotalaria, anise, fraxinella, Abelmoschus esculentus, caryophyllaceous plant, Ballota nigra, evening primrose, basil thyme, American licorice, coral necklace, crowfoot, bells of Ireland, Aureolaria pedicularia, graminaceous plant, bedstraw, dayflower, Elettaria cardamomum, chicory, Chrysanthemum balsamita, Aureolaria virginica, black lovage, blue thistle, drypis, canna, black archangel, vascular plant, bleeding heart, belladonna, baby blue-eyes, elsholtzia, bishop's hat, blue devil, Asparagus plumosus, cupflower, corn mayweed, cumin, bugle, German chamomile, Borago officinalis, bog hemp, herb of grace, asparagus, Conopodium denudatum, digitalis, gypsywort, dandelion, balsam herb, cottonweed, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Anthemis nobilis, Ethiopian banana, burning bush, common unicorn plant, Diplotaxis tenuifolia, giant hyssop, butterflower, arum, gromwell, Ananas comosus, celandine, globe flower, goat rue, flannel leaf, fiesta flower, Chrysanthemum parthenium, Australian sword lily, golden thread, gall of the earth, blowball, buckwheat, black henbane, fumewort, coolwart, Egyptian henbane, gum plant, herb Paris, cow parsley, endive, argemone, anchusa, Catharanthus roseus, celery, amaranth, Galeopsis tetrahit, American liquorice, Dicentra canadensis, flameflower, Glaux maritima, banana, dead nettle, Echium vulgare, beefsteak plant, black horehound, alpine coltsfoot, alumbloom, Epimedium grandiflorum, elephant-tusk, galax, Ayapana triplinervis, Ageratina altissima, Acinos arvensis, Fumaria officinalis, Herb Simon, creeping zinnia, Guinea grains, Bowiea volubilis, Coptis trifolia groenlandica, false rue anemone, fringepod, Asparagus setaceous, Halogeton glomeratus, herbs mercury, campanula, devil's claw, clammy chickweed, bloodroot, gumbo



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