Online dictionaryOnline dictionary
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Class   /klæs/   Listen
Class

noun
1.
A collection of things sharing a common attribute.  Synonyms: category, family.
2.
A body of students who are taught together.  Synonyms: course, form, grade.
3.
People having the same social, economic, or educational status.  Synonyms: social class, socio-economic class, stratum.  "An emerging professional class"
4.
Education imparted in a series of lessons or meetings.  Synonyms: course, course of instruction, course of study.  "Flirting is not unknown in college classes"
5.
A league ranked by quality.  Synonym: division.  "Princeton is in the NCAA Division 1-AA"
6.
A body of students who graduate together.  Synonym: year.  "She was in my year at Hoehandle High"
7.
(biology) a taxonomic group containing one or more orders.
8.
Elegance in dress or behavior.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |
Add this dictionary
to your browser search bar





"Class" Quotes from Famous Books



... of a simpler and swifter mode of writing is felt by all who have much writing to do—by newspaper men, by legal gentlemen, by clergymen, by students in taking class lectures and making notes of many things valuable for future "refreshment," authors and scientific men in recording ...
— Miss Dexie - A Romance of the Provinces • Stanford Eveleth

... class we find here and there on the earth's surface districts sprinkled with innumerable shallow lakes of all sizes, down to mere pools. Such, for instance, occur in the district of Le Doubs between the Rhone ...
— The Beauties of Nature - and the Wonders of the World We Live In • Sir John Lubbock

... seems that the journeying of my jade was near its ending. For upon this morning, fortune threw me into the way of a fellow who had been in my class at the University, who was to be my deus ex machina. No two persons in the world could have been more dissimilar than "Jack" Ballard and I, and yet, perhaps for that reason, there had always been a kind of affinity between ...
— Paradise Garden - The Satirical Narrative of a Great Experiment • George Gibbs

... the Word in the Hebrew, in which this particle is soft, beginning and ending with a vowel sound. Again, in the Word, in Hebrew, it can in some measure be seen from the words used whether they belong to the celestial class or the spiritual class, that is, whether they involve good or truth. Those involving good partake largely of the sounds of u and o, and also somewhat of a, while those involving truth partake of the sounds ...
— Heaven and its Wonders and Hell • Emanuel Swedenborg

... seem to indicate that the average woman, of any class of society, places the "prevailing mode" first in her personal clothing problems. How to be "in style" absorbs much attention and time. Surely it is overshadowing other very important considerations relating to dress. When American women have awakened to the real importance of ...
— Vocational Guidance for Girls • Marguerite Stockman Dickson

... that Sunday evening at seven o'clock, as was her wont, to a Bible class which she had started for the instruction of some of the poor neglected boys and lads who idled about in the dreary back streets of our aristocratic neighbourhood. The boys had become so fond of her that they were eager to attend, and usually assembled round ...
— My Doggie and I • R.M. Ballantyne

... Some of these experts have never been called so in their lives, and will be greatly astonished to find that they are called so now. But when I know they are the thing, why should I hesitate about the name? In any proper meaning of the word there are several first-class "experts" among my friends who go fishing, sealing, whaling, hunting, trapping, "furring" or guiding for their livelihood. And I hereby most gratefully acknowledge all I have learnt during many a pleasant day with them, afloat and ashore. The other kind ...
— Draft of a Plan for Beginning Animal Sanctuaries in Labrador • William Wood

... waistcoat, the well-ironed shirt and collar, English scarf, and the blackthorn stick which he carried balanced in the hollow of his arm. If he had been in overalls she would not have hesitated an instant, but she saw that this man was not of her class, nor of any other class about her. "I don't know whether ye can or not," came the frank reply. "I'm thinkin' about it. You don't look as if ye were flat broke. If you're goin' to take me room, I don't want to be watchin' ye, and I won't! Once we know ye're ...
— Felix O'Day • F. Hopkinson Smith

... knowledge cry out. A very small inaccuracy in a picture which is otherwise photographic will often have a very disturbing effect. In plays of society in particular, the criticism "No one does such things," is held by a large class of playgoers to be conclusive and destructive. One has known people despise a play because Lady So-and-so's manner of speaking to her servants was not what they (the cavillers) were accustomed to. On the other hand, one has heard a whole ...
— Play-Making - A Manual of Craftsmanship • William Archer

... I do not know; for certainly I do not put him beyond the pale if his response is not as mine. And yet he will differ, I feel sure, in more significant matters. He is not altogether of my world. Nor does he enter into this essay. There are enough without him, and of every class. In the West, the very day laborer pitches his camp in the mountains for his two weeks' holiday. In the East and Middle West, every pond with a fringe of hemlocks, or hill view by a trolley line, or strip of ocean ...
— Definitions • Henry Seidel Canby

... hands, he pinned it for her. She saw, felt, and noted his hands; a pitying admiration, of which only the pity was foolish, woke in her; and ere she knew, she was looking up in his face with such a light in her eyes that Andrew found himself embarrassed, and let his fall. Moved by that sense of class-superiority which has no place in the kingdom of heaven, she attributed his modesty to self-depreciation, and the conviction rose in her, which has often risen in such as she, that there is a magnanimity demanding the sacrifice, not merely of conventional dignity, ...
— The Elect Lady • George MacDonald

... of this class, held in subjection, existed in nearly all the States, but was more numerous and of more serious concernment in the South than in the North on account of natural differences of climate and production; and it was foreseen that, ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... true gentleman," committed suicide together with four of his captains. Li Hung-chang was then sent to Japan to sue for peace, and while there he was shot in the cheek by a fanatical member of the Soshi class. This act brought him much sympathy—he was then seventy-two years old; and in the treaty of Shimonoseki, which he negotiated, better terms perhaps were obtained than would otherwise have been the case. ...
— China and the Manchus • Herbert A. Giles

... neighborhood by perpetual catastrophes. But this kind of humility is rendered especially difficult in these days, by the contumely thrown on men in humble employments. The very removal of the massy bars which once separated one class of society from another, has rendered it tenfold more shameful in foolish people's, i.e., in most people's eyes, to remain in the lower grades of it, than ever it was before. When a man born of an artisan was looked upon as an entirely different species of animal from a man born ...
— On the Old Road Vol. 1 (of 2) - A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature • John Ruskin

... is another class of men to be considered. I mean the heathen, and all those who never had the means of knowing the way of life. What about the untold millions that passed away in the darkness? Will not the grace and power that redeemed such a man as Saul ...
— Love's Final Victory • Horatio

... characteristic of this class of Christians is their belief in the final holiness and happiness of the whole human family. Some of them believe that all punishment for sin is endured in the present state of existence, while others believe it extends into the future life; but all agree that it is administered in a ...
— The Book of Religions • John Hayward

... further remark. He was one of the taciturn specimens of his class, and began at once to unload the waggon. With the able assistance of Brook and his men, and the feeble aid of the "Tottie," or Hottentot leader of the "span" of oxen, the boxes, ploughs, barrels, bags, cases, etcetera, which ...
— The Settler and the Savage • R.M. Ballantyne

... Biddle, of Philadelphia," replied the scoundrel, in very gentleman-like accents for one of his class. "They say she's never been able to find a man good enough for her, and so she's keeping herself on ice till she dies, in hopes that she'll find one in heaven. ...
— The Honorable Peter Stirling and What People Thought of Him • Paul Leicester Ford

... he tried to ascribe to himself what his father did. Other critics reluctant to bring so serious a charge against a man who held honorable positions in Spain and later in England believe that the material in class c relates to the second voyage—that of 1498, and that by a mistake it was in the minds of the narrators confused with the voyage of 1497. For a presentation of all the original material the reader may be ...
— The Northmen, Columbus and Cabot, 985-1503 • Various

... but immortality. It sounds harsh, but let us admit it; he was at best a great imitator, however noble the objects of his imitation. A recent writer has tried to put him in the class with "John Rogers, the Pride of America," but this is manifestly unfair. As an artist he ranks rather with ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 6 - Subtitle: Little Journeys to the Homes of Eminent Artists • Elbert Hubbard

... highly considered French officer, though he had not then given promise of being a popular hero and a world-famous man. General Boulanger's mother was named Griffith; she was a lady belonging apparently to the upper middle class in Wales. She had a great admiration for George Washington, and the future French hero received one of his names from the American "father of his country." In his boyhood Boulanger was always called George; but when he came of age he preferred to call himself ...
— France in the Nineteenth Century • Elizabeth Latimer

... declension are mostly masculine, and so on. From such a system as this two results are reasonably sure to follow. Where the gender of a noun in literary Latin did not conform to these rules, in popular Latin it would be brought into harmony with others of its class. Thus stigma, one of the few neuter nouns in -a, and consequently assigned to the third declension, was brought in popular speech into line with sella and the long list of similar words in -a, was made feminine, and put in the first declension. In the case of another class ...
— The Common People of Ancient Rome - Studies of Roman Life and Literature • Frank Frost Abbott

... century have mostly originated in two totally distinct ranks of society. They have either been the scions of noble and powerful families; or they have arisen, in spite of circumstance, from humble parents, by the sole recommendation of personal worth. Of the great middle class, the class which is certainly the most respectable of the English community, and which is at present the controlling power in the state, but few have recently attained great eminence. That the titled and wealthy should advance to power and influence in a government ...
— Continental Monthly - Volume 1 - Issue 3 • Various

... worry of keeping the English community in hand, the Boers have been visited by other plagues, such as rinderpest. In 1897 such a calamity befell them, and although the rich farmers did not suffer materially, the poorer class experienced reverses sufficient to discourage them for life. The mistake made was simply this (and it is characteristic of the Boers): every individual farmer and owner of stock exercised his own judgment throughout, and the most drastic results followed as a consequence. Temporary ...
— The Boer in Peace and War • Arthur M. Mann

... voyage to Mombasa and back was thirty-five days, the twelve vessels were sufficient to maintain a continuous service, with an occasional extra voyage for the transport of goods, particularly of horses. There was no distinction of class on board the vessels of the Society; no fee was taken from anyone, either for transport or for board during the whole voyage, and everyone was therefore obliged to be content with the same kind of accommodation, which certainly was not ...
— Freeland - A Social Anticipation • Theodor Hertzka

... than half your fault," went on the man on the real side of the mirror. "You dug and worked, and you thought that if you only kept ahead of your class in Physiology you had a clean card to success. How many fellows did ...
— Stanford Stories - Tales of a Young University • Charles K. Field

... separate and distinct class, and against us every avenue of improvement was effectually closed. Strangers from all lands of a color different from ours were ...
— A Social History of the American Negro • Benjamin Brawley

... time would she have left to live the only life she's fit to lead if she had to make money? I'm not worried about bare life for Helen; I'm worried about what kind of life it's to be. Helen was brought up to be an idler and to make a good marriage—like most girls of her class—and she hasn't made it, and she's not likely ...
— Franklin Kane • Anne Douglas Sedgwick

... old man, I, whom you envy, perhaps—yes, I, who am beginning to get on in the world, as middle-class people say—I, who publish books and earn a little money—well, I am being killed by it all. I have often already told you this, but you don't believe me, because, as you only turn out work with a deal of trouble and cannot bring yourself to public notice, happiness in your eyes could naturally ...
— His Masterpiece • Emile Zola

... prediction is not inspiration; the one may be wrought out by man, the other descends from God. The same principle which led Erasmus to predict that those who were "in power" would destroy the rich shrines, because no other class of men in society could mate with so mighty a body as the monks, conducted the author of Piers Ploughman to the same conclusion; and since power only could accomplish that great purpose, he fixed on the highest as the most likely; and thus the wise prediction was, ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... and so on throughout the piece; but Mariyeh is evidently the person alluded to, according to the common practice of Muslim poets of a certain class, who consider it indecent openly to mention a woman as an ...
— Tales from the Arabic Volumes 1-3 • John Payne

... otherwise than to summarise them. The Liberal party have maintained their ascendancy, and they have provided the town with a set of schools that cannot be equalled by any town in the kingdom, either for number, magnificence of architecture, educational appliance, high-class teachers, or (which is the most important) means for the advancement of the scholars, to whom every inducement is held out for self-improvement, except in the matter of religion, which, as nearly ...
— Showell's Dictionary of Birmingham - A History And Guide Arranged Alphabetically • Thomas T. Harman and Walter Showell

... circuit. His talents are undeniable, as he commenced his education at fourteen and terminated it at twenty-one, the law- course included. This man is an epitome of all that is good and all that is bad, in a very large class of his fellow citizens. He is quick-witted, prompt in action, enterprising in all things in which he has nothing to lose, but wary and cautious in all things in which he has a real stake, and ready to turn not only his hand, but his heart and his principles to any thing that offers an advantage. ...
— Home as Found • James Fenimore Cooper

... don't happen in life like they do in books, because a first-class story could be made out of Joey Pond's knack for moving things by looking at them. In a book Joey might have saved the world or destroyed it, depending on which line would interest the most readers and bring the writer the fattest ...
— To Remember Charlie By • Roger Dee

... a bully; but it was vanity and not malice which made him always spoil for a fight. He and Viggo Hook had attended the parson's "Confirmation Class," together, and it was there their hostility ...
— Boyhood in Norway • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... Deane's ed.; Arber, op. cit. p. 305. The fact that Lyford (Bradford, Historie, Mass. ed. p. 217) recommended that every "particular" (i.e. non-partnership colonist) sent out by the Adventurers—and they had come to be mostly of that class—"should come over as an Adventurer, even if only a ser vant," and the fact that he recognized that some one would have to pay in L10 to make each one an Adventurer, would seem to indicate that any one was eligible and that either L10 was the price of the ...
— The Mayflower and Her Log, Complete • Azel Ames

... don't pretend you don't know that Miss Nevil is a great partisan of yours, swears by you, says you're misunderstood by people, and, what's infernally odd in a woman who don't belong to the class you fancy, don't talk of your habits. That's why she wants to consult you about Somers, I suppose, and that's why, knowing you might influence her, I came here ...
— A Sappho of Green Springs • Bret Harte

... severe and geometrical in its reasoning, there is scarcely any human occupation which it does not enlighten, and upon the perfection of which it may not have great influence. It bestows great enjoyment to every class of individuals: and who would not be ambitious of becoming acquainted with a science which enlightens almost every species ...
— James Cutbush - An American Chemist, 1788-1823 • Edgar F. Smith

... fell through the opened roof upon new canvases fastened to the frames. And it poured down bountifully upon intelligent young faces. The scene was a beautiful one, and it was complete except in one particular: the teacher of the class was missing—the teacher and ...
— A Cathedral Singer • James Lane Allen

... experience exactly the same dream. If this were an ordinary imposture, the machinery would be arranged for results that would but little vary; if it were a supernatural agency permitted by the Almighty, it would surely be for some definite end. These phenomena belong to neither class; my persuasion is, that they originate in some brain now far distant; that that brain had no distinct volition in anything that occurred; that what does occur reflects but its devious, motley, ever-shifting, half-formed thoughts; in short, that it has been but the dreams ...
— The Best Ghost Stories • Various

... I see how it is! You're getting cussed sick of this two-cent game here," said Candage, mournfully. "I don't blame ye. We ain't in your class, here, Captain Mayo." He took the papers which the young man held out to him. "I suppose this is the last time we'll share, you and me. I'll miss ye devilish bad. I'd rather go for nothing and let you have ...
— Blow The Man Down - A Romance Of The Coast - 1916 • Holman Day

... Vacation of the College will be expired on Wednesday the 6th of May, any Students then offering themselves shall be admitted into such Class, as (upon Examination) they shall be found ...
— As I Remember - Recollections of American Society during the Nineteenth Century • Marian Gouverneur

... naturally command a very wide class of those intelligent readers, for whom the Earl of Iddesleigh, in 'lectures and Essays,' puts forward a courageous plea in his informing and genial address on the uses ...
— Marmion • Sir Walter Scott

... observation seldom falsified, that such exercises, by poets of the higher class, display neither their special characteristics, nor any special characteristics at all. Matthew Arnold's was not one of the exceptions. It is very much better than most school prize poems: it shows the critical and scholarly character of the writer ...
— Matthew Arnold • George Saintsbury

... Presidency. Similar sentiments were manifested by the advanced antislavery men of Missouri, who, in their hot faction-fight with the "conservatives" of that State, had not received from Lincoln the active support they demanded. Still another class of Union men, mainly in the East, gravely shook their heads when considering the question whether Lincoln should be re-elected. They were those who cherished in their minds an ideal of statesmanship and of personal bearing in high office ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... spoke one of the leading representatives of the peasant class, Lars Larsson, the deputy from the ...
— Historic Girls • E. S. Brooks

... citizenship in old Marlowe's mind which very few women, certainly not a girl as young as Phebe, could have shared. Many years ago the elder Sefton had perceived that the companionless man was groping vaguely after many a dim thought, political and social, which few men of his class would have been troubled with. He had given to him several books, which old Marlowe had pondered over. Now he felt that, quite apart from his own personal ground of resentment, he had done wrong to the laws ...
— Cobwebs and Cables • Hesba Stretton

... Reynolds (b. Dublin 1844), F.R.S., professor of chemistry, Trinity College, Dublin, for many years, discovered the primary thiocarbamide and a number of other chemical substances, including a new class of colloids and several groups of organic and other compounds ...
— The Glories of Ireland • Edited by Joseph Dunn and P.J. Lennox

... you, but wait until you hear what it is I want you to do. This afternoon my class from the settlement is coming here for tea after I have taken them to the Art Museum. There are ten of them; all girls about your own age. I intended to give them chocolate and cake, as it is so cold to-day, ...
— Phyllis - A Twin • Dorothy Whitehill

... which are not cultivated, but grow in the wild state, are a many-seeded berry, blue or bluish-black in color. Huckleberries, although belonging to a different class, are commonly regarded as blueberries by many persons. Berries of this kind occur in many varieties. Some grow on low bushes close to the ground, others are found on taller bushes, and still others grow on very tall bushes. Again, some grow in dry ground in a ...
— Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5 • Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

... began to think that possibly he had misplaced his confidence and that the dwarf might not be precisely the sort of person to whom to entrust a secret of such delicacy and importance. And being led and tempted on by this remorseful thought into a condition which the evil-minded class before referred to would term the maudlin state or stage of drunkenness, it occurred to Mr Swiveller to cast his hat upon the ground, and moan, crying aloud that he was an unhappy orphan, and that if he had not been an unhappy orphan things ...
— The Old Curiosity Shop • Charles Dickens

... enough, or a class on which you can rely, nothing will delight them more than to do their own dyeing. A fourth-grade class in one of the Baltimore schools has successfully dyed all the raffia, cord, cotton, and textiles ...
— Construction Work for Rural and Elementary Schools • Virginia McGaw

... germs of all human qualities, sometimes manifesting one quality, sometimes another; and often does not resemble himself at all, manifesting no change. With some people these changes are particularly sharp. And to this class Nekhludoff belonged. These changes in him had both physical and spiritual causes; and one of these changes ...
— The Awakening - The Resurrection • Leo Nikoleyevich Tolstoy

... concern itself with the monarchy. It should hardly any longer, it seems to me, let the monarchy play the part of the seductive wanton who turns the thoughts of all citizens to war—which is much against the message of Christianity—and to class distinctions, to luxury, to show and vanity. The monarchy is now so great a lie that it compels the most upright man ...
— Bjoernstjerne Bjoernson • William Morton Payne

... was a great miser in Amsterdam; he lived in the most miserable way that a man could live in; wore nothing but rags; and having been formerly a seaman, his attire was generally of the description common to his class. He had one son, to whom he denied the necessaries of life, and whom he treated most cruelly. After vain attempts to possess a portion of his father's wealth, the devil instigated the son to murder the old man, who was one ...
— The Phantom Ship • Captain Frederick Marryat

... of thoughtful practice is what we call experience: it is the power or faculty of seeing clearly before you begin, what to avoid and what to select—or rather what to do and what not to do. High-class workmanship, or technical knowledge, was in his hands quite a science. Every piece of work was made subject to the soundest philosophical principles, as applied to the use and treatment of materials. It was this that gave such a charm of enjoyment to his dealing with tools and materials. ...
— James Nasmyth's Autobiography • James Nasmyth

... of the Japanese art of cookery; but Dr. Almquist and Lieut. Nordquist, who were more unprejudiced, said they could put up with them very well. The following menu gives an idea of what a Japanese inn of the better class has to offer:— ...
— The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II • A.E. Nordenskieold

... of pure white cottages. The newly-drained land swarmed with stocks of new breeds: horses and sheep from Flanders, cattle from Normandy; for Richard de Rulos was the first—as far as history tells—of that noble class of agricultural squires, who are England's blessing ...
— Hereward, The Last of the English • Charles Kingsley

... wish I could be in your class!" cried Bunny. "Even though I am a grade ahead of you," he added. "Does she tell about Indian fights with bows and arrows, and taking ...
— Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Big Woods • Laura Lee Hope

... It is not your time. My soul, I think, is ages older than yours. It takes ages of schooling to get into that class that may leave Earth forever, and be as the angels. Even now I know, I am sure that you are fretting and miserable for the love of some woman. For whose ...
— The Maid of Maiden Lane • Amelia E. Barr

... the dangers which surround them. Nor, it may be added, do the few who possess the presence of mind to study and the faculty of appreciating the signs of such a political tempest, always honestly interpret them. As has been said, a large class eagerly welcomed the decision that Kentucky should remain neutral in the great struggle impending, as a relief, however temporary, from the harassing consideration of dangers at which they shuddered. Nine men out of ten, will shrink from making up their minds upon a difficult ...
— History of Morgan's Cavalry • Basil W. Duke

... the mission was a higher class of workers. This need was now to be supplied—in fact, the preparation for its supply had been quietly going on concurrently with the mission itself, though in a different quarter of ...
— A History of the English Church in New Zealand • Henry Thomas Purchas

... command of Egyptian overseers who kept count of the bricks, cutting their number upon tally sticks, or sometimes writing them upon sherds. These overseers were brutal fellows, for the most part of the low class, who used vile language to the slaves. Nor were they content with words. Noting a crowd gathered at one place and hearing cries, we went to see what passed. Here we found a lad stretched upon the ground being cruelly ...
— Moon of Israel • H. Rider Haggard

... includes a certain set of people, of the middle class very "middlish," who are ever on the look-out for some opportunity, however slight and seemingly remote, of bettering themselves socially; and, learning that those in a higher strata of society are interested ...
— Scottish Ghost Stories • Elliott O'Donnell

... this class are on foot from the dawn of day. Their talent is evinced by the adroit mode in which they baffle the vigilance of the porters. They go up the staircase, sometimes on one pretext, and sometimes on another, look round them, and if they find any keys in the doors, ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 14, - Issue 389, September 12, 1829 • Various

... North Carolina History will be greatly aided in the work by having a wall map of North Carolina before the class, and to this end the publishers have prepared a good and accurate school map, which will be furnished at ...
— School History of North Carolina • John W. Moore

... one can be climbing the Rockies and at the same time partaking of an excellent dinner served as in a first-class hotel!" he remarked ...
— Hunter's Marjory - A Story for Girls • Margaret Bruce Clarke

... into the class of vocational agriculture in the ninth grade I try to get him to plant some black walnuts so they will get big enough to graft while he is in high school. The use of this method is helpful in getting many trees started. ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the 43rd Annual Meeting - Rockport, Indiana, August 25, 26 and 27, 1952 • Various

... of age and upwards may select an area not exceeding 200 acres of first-class land, provided he does not hold land on credit under any previous Act. He is required to pay a cash deposit of $0.04 an acre at the time of sale, an instalment of $0.06 an acre for each of the two following years, $0.24 an acre annually for the next four years, $0.36 an acre for the next ...
— Australia The Dairy Country • Australia Department of External Affairs

... missionary gave me the charge of a class. We were to meet, and talk together about our souls, and God's love for us, and to do all we could to help each other to the better land. To do my duty as the leader was a great and an important work. ...
— On the Indian Trail - Stories of Missionary Work among Cree and Salteaux Indians • Egerton Ryerson Young

... mortalia. Eleganter, ut solet, Peile, 'unearthly cannons. (Cf. Ainaw. D. s. v.) Perrecondita autem est quaestio de lusibus illorum temporum, neque in Smithii Dict. Class. satis elucidata. Consule omnino Kentf. de Bill. Loculis, bene ...
— Verses and Translations • C. S. C.

... is the case in England; at least was During the dynasty of Dandies, now Perchance succeeded by some other class Of imitated Imitators:—how[bn] Irreparably soon decline, alas! The Demagogues of fashion: all below Is frail; how easily the world is lost By Love, or War, and, now ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... rough, strong utterance, the harshly manifested passions, the unbridled aversions, and headlong partialities of unlettered moorland hinds and rugged moorland squires, who have grown up untaught and unchecked, except by Mentors as harsh as themselves. A large class of readers, likewise, will suffer greatly from the introduction into the pages of this work of words printed with all their letters, which it has become the custom to represent by the initial and final letter only—a ...
— Charlotte Bronte's Notes on the pseudonyms used • Charlotte Bronte

... illustrations do not tally sufficiently with the text of the story. Some of the stories, in my opinion, are weak and not worth reading. But, as tastes differ, I take everything as it is, and say you have a first-class publication. ...
— Astounding Stories, July, 1931 • Various

... etchings of Pinelli) without the crest, and his feet and ankles bound with the ties of sandals. The figure is that of a tall muscular man of the finest proportions. The face, in all its features, is of the noblest class of ...
— Some Observations on the Ethnography and Archaeology of the American Aborigines • Samuel George Morton

... not inelegant, but there was a certain retinue wanting. He bowed well, but still it was not exactly the bow of a gentleman. The nursery-maids as they passed by said, "Dear me, what a handsome gentleman!" but had the remark been made by a higher class, it would have been qualified into "What a handsome man!" His age was apparently about five-and-thirty—it might have been something more. After a short time he left off his mechanical amusements, and turning round, perceived little Joey at the farther end. Whether from ...
— The Poacher - Joseph Rushbrook • Frederick Marryat

... a mustard-seed; but it might grow, for I knew well how sensitive was the nature of the Secretary; and he had not been consulted. And so I took it upon myself to be cicerone to the stranger. He was very grateful,—for a long time. Col. B. had graduated at West Point in the same class with the President and Bishop Polk, and subsequently, after following various pursuits, being once, I believe, a preacher, became settled as a teacher of mathematics at the University of Virginia. The colonel stayed near me, aiding in the work of answering ...
— A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital • John Beauchamp Jones

... chap reaching for the valise. I let out a yell, went after him and he dropped it. Ahem! Nothing like having a first-class hero in the family!" and Walter swelled out his chest, and ...
— The Motor Girls on Waters Blue - Or The Strange Cruise of The Tartar • Margaret Penrose

... warehouse. D-class leadys were loading material and weapons on surface carts. Cranes and derricks were working busily everywhere. The work was done with efficiency, but without hurry ...
— The Defenders • Philip K. Dick

... couldn't close my eyes all night." Then he began to twirl a huge cane, executing with a silly sort of care a variety of evolutions, the greater or less precision and agility of which were considered proofs of a young man's standing in the class of the ...
— The Chouans • Honore de Balzac

... good fortune that day, for they gave us a train of passenger coaches with seats, and our officers had a first-class coach in front. The other squadrons, and most of the other regiments, had to travel in open trucks, although I do not think any grumbled on that score. There was a French staff officer to each train, and ...
— Hira Singh - When India came to fight in Flanders • Talbot Mundy

... 6, 1899, the Agrarian Party was formed. It was chiefly composed of farmers and peasants. It defended the interests of their class and acquired considerable influence among them. In national matters it subscribed to the programme of Bohemian independence, and its organs have during the present war ...
— Independent Bohemia • Vladimir Nosek

... acclamations of a people proud of the genius and success of their great countryman. A day of thanksgiving was appointed. In all the cities of the Seven Provinces the public joy manifested itself by festivities of which the expense was chiefly defrayed by voluntary gifts. Every class assisted. The poorest labourer could help to set up an arch of triumph, or to bring sedge to a bonfire. Even the ruined Huguenots of France could contribute the aid of their ingenuity. One art which ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 3 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... with her innate love of beauty and charm in all personal things, the interior of the bungalow was a revelation. Never before had she been inside a middle class home, and what she saw not only far exceeded anything she had imagined, but was vastly different from her imaginings. Mrs. Mortimer noted her sparkling glances which took in everything, and went out of her way to show Saxon around, doing it under the guise of gleeful ...
— The Valley of the Moon • Jack London

... selfishness, but for your own sake, I know your love for your family, and know that it is reciprocal; I therefore cannot help thinking that you would mutually be lost to each other. The friends, too, which you have here, are of the highest and most desirable class. To quit them, in order to make new friendships in a strange land, in which the generality of its inhabitants at present seem incapable of such virtues as friendship is built upon, ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 3 • Madame D'Arblay

... from such slighter and vaguer tokens of the realm of marvel, up to the portents of ghostly apparitions or haunted chambers, I believe that the greater number of persons arrived at middle age, however instructed the class, however civilized the land, however sceptical the period, to which they belong, have either in themselves experienced, or heard recorded by intimate associates whose veracity they accept as indisputable in all ordinary transactions of life, phenomena which ...
— A Strange Story, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... they were in the olden time. In the first place, there is the caste of priests, which is separated from all the others; next there are the artificers, who exercise their several crafts by themselves, and without admixture of any other; and also there is the class of shepherds and that of hunters, as well as that of husbandmen; and you will observe, too, that the warriors in Egypt are separated from all the other classes, and are commanded by the law only to engage in war; moreover, the weapons with which they are equipped are shields and spears, ...
— The Antediluvian World • Ignatius Donnelly

... seemed to indicate an inner revolt against the brutifying manual labour which was beginning to bend him to the ground. He was, no doubt, an intelligent nature buried beneath the oppressive burden of race and class; one of those delicate refined minds embedded in a rough envelope, from which they in vain struggle to free themselves. Thus, in spite of his vigour, he seemed timid and restless, feeling a kind of unconscious shame ...
— The Fortune of the Rougons • Emile Zola

... species whatever in the whole class of Reptiles, is a marked feature in the zoology of this country, as well as in that of the Falkland Islands. I do not ground this statement merely on my own observation, but I heard it from the Spanish inhabitants of the latter place, and from Jemmy ...
— The Voyage of the Beagle • Charles Darwin

... boy?" said Meredith, joining the group about Harkless's chair. "Those fellows are Sophomores, class of heaven knows what. Aren't you feeling a ...
— The Gentleman From Indiana • Booth Tarkington

... this singular piety in externals (for it was really a species of piety), this typical sailor never gave up his belief in the efficacy of strong language, which, among the worst of his class, was frequently indescribable; and the more eloquent he was in the utterance of oaths the larger became his conviction that he possessed a gift not to be acquired by mere tuition. Many years ago, when I was a very small apprentice boy aboard a brig we had a steward who was also a sailor ...
— Windjammers and Sea Tramps • Walter Runciman

... The Cloud-Messenger an elegiac poem, though it would not perhaps meet the test of a rigid definition. The Hindus class it with The Dynasty of Raghu and The Birth of the War-god as a kavya, but this classification simply evidences their embarrassment. In fact, Kalidasa created in The Cloud-Messenger a ...
— Translations of Shakuntala and Other Works • Kaalidaasa

... apart by putting a band, B, around each end of both rods. The bare wires are pinched under the upper bands. The whole is then bound together by means of the bands, A, and placed in a tumbler of fluid, as given in App. 15. This method does not make first-class connections between the wire and ...
— How Two Boys Made Their Own Electrical Apparatus • Thomas M. (Thomas Matthew) St. John

... praising your great march through Georgia, and the capture of Savannah, there is a certain class having now great influence with the President, and very probably anticipating still more on a change of cabinet, who are decidedly disposed to make a point against you. I mean in regard to "inevitable Sambo." ...
— The Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Complete • William T. Sherman

... bring destruction on the worshiper; what could he do but lean upon the priest? The latter could say the prayers if he could not pray. All this worked powerfully for the elevation of the Brahmans, the "men of prayer;" they steadily grew into a class, a caste; and into this no one could enter who was not of priestly descent. Schools were now found necessary for the study of the sacred books, rites, and traditions. The importance which these attach to theology—doctrine—is very small; the externals of religion are all in all. The rites, ...
— Two Old Faiths - Essays on the Religions of the Hindus and the Mohammedans • J. Murray Mitchell and William Muir

... When class was over, the little scholars went their way to church, happy Pollie with her friend's hand still clasped in hers; and the bells rang out their peaceful chime, "It is the Sabbath! it is the Sabbath!" Even the usual noisy bustle of ...
— Little Pollie - A Bunch of Violets • Gertrude P. Dyer

... sitting, and extended his hand to each in turn, as Hawkins pronounced his name. Kit Kellogg scrutinized him and shook his hand with considerable warmth. Crumpet did the same, though with less cordiality in his manner. It was plain (and plainer to none than Deerfoot) that he was one of that numerous class of frontiersmen who regard the American Indian as an unmitigated nuisance, which, so far as possible, every white man should do his utmost to abate. He had been engaged in more than one desperate encounter with them and his hatred was of the most ferocious nature. ...
— Camp-fire and Wigwam • Edward Sylvester Ellis

... without its pleasures and excitements, yet it began to grow very irksome both to Don Pablo and Dona Isidora. Life in the wilderness, with its rude cares and rude enjoyments, may be very pleasant for a while to those who seek it as amateurs, or to that class who as colonists intend to make it a permanent thing. But neither Don Pablo nor his wife had ever thought of colonisation. With them their present industry was the result of accident and necessity. Their tastes and longings were very different. They longed to return to civilised ...
— Popular Adventure Tales • Mayne Reid

... which they found half full of applicants for medicine, among whom their entrance with the corpse produced no greater sensation than a momentary stare. The attire and bearing of Sir Norman proving him to be something different from their usual class of visitors, bringing one of the drowsy apprentices immediately to his side, inquiring ...
— The Midnight Queen • May Agnes Fleming

... As a special class of speeches we may mention the address made in Italian on the battlefield, either before or after the combat. Federigo of Urbino was esteemed a classic in this style; he used to pass round among his squadrons as they stood ...
— The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy • Jacob Burckhardt

... feelings altogether dissimilar. We cannot conceive of them as using the expressions or the gestures of each other. Let us suppose that a zoologist should attempt to give an account of some animal, a porcupine for instance, to people who had never seen it. The porcupine, he might say, is of the class mammalia, and the order glires. There are whiskers on its face; it is two feet long; it has four toes before, five behind, two fore teeth, and eight grinders. Its body is covered with hair and quills. And, when all this ...
— The Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches of Lord Macaulay, Vol. 2 (of 4) - Contributions To The Edinburgh Review • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... nothing about them—have shown me what the Bible means. Your father and brother knew what I had done, they met me separately, quite independent of each other, and both of them held out their hands to me; why, except that I had offended them, I cannot tell. A stranger, belonging to an obscure class, I had no claim upon them except that I had done what ought to have closed their house against me. And you know how they have interpreted that. They have shown ...
— Phoebe, Junior • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... to adopt, in my turn, a successful example from the once Great Unknown—now the not less great avowed author of the Waverley Novels, in the person of Sir Walter Scott, who did me the honor to adopt the style or class of novel of which "Thaddeus of Warsaw" was the first,—a class which, uniting the personages and facts of real history or biography with a combining and illustrative machinery of the imagination, formed a new species ...
— Thaddeus of Warsaw • Jane Porter

... suffice that we were driven down in two big sleigh-loads by Thomas Finch, the back wall of our defense, and Don Cameron, who plays in the right of the forward line, both great, strapping fellows, who are to be eventually, I believe, members of my preparatory class. ...
— Glengarry Schooldays • Ralph Connor

... over, and bonnetless women of low and high degree are returning to their homes; some wearing mantillas of satin, black and shining as their raven hair, which are pinned by a jeweled pin upon the top of their heads; others, more modern in their tastes, sport India shawls; while the common class still cling to the "rebosa," which they so ingeniously twirl around their heads and chests as to include in its narrow folds their arms, and all above the waist except the face. Priests appear in black gowns, and fur hats with such ample ...
— Mexico and its Religion • Robert A. Wilson

... ride into the Station and come back with one hundred rupees. He would, with that money in his pocket, walk to the nearest side-station on the line, about five miles away, and would there take a first-class ticket for Karachi. Knowing that he had no money on him when he went out shooting, his regiment would not immediately wire to the seaports, but would hunt for him in the native villages near the river. Further, no ...
— Indian Tales • Rudyard Kipling

... desk at a lower level. The lower part is boldly corbelled out and the junction of the octagon with the pier shafts is well managed, but the upper open-panelled part is rather too definitely cut off from the lower by the battlemented cornice. Very few examples of this class of pulpit exist in England, and none ...
— Bell's Cathedrals: The Churches of Coventry - A Short History of the City and Its Medieval Remains • Frederic W. Woodhouse

... to answer the following question: A judge being irremovable, and consequently debarred from being, according to your subtle distinction, a functionary, and receiving a salary which is not the equivalent of the work he does, is he to be included in the class of clerks?" ...
— Bureaucracy • Honore de Balzac

... itself very readily to such preliminary treatment. In a first-class article, the beans should be of the highest excellence; they should be carefully grown on the plantation and there prepared with great skill, arriving in the factory in good condition. In the factory they should simply receive the mechanical ...
— Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes and Home Made Candy Recipes • Miss Parloa

... fact that while there were few abroad in the temple grounds at night, there were yet enough to make it possible for him to fare forth under cover of his disguise without attracting the unpleasant attention of the guards, and, too, he had noticed that the priesthood constituted a privileged class that seemed to come and go at will and unchallenged throughout the palace as well as the temple. Altogether then, he decided, night furnished the most propitious hours for his investigation—by day he could lie up ...
— Tarzan the Terrible • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... there comes a stage when the girls almost invariably go to the wall, because they will stand snubbing, and the boys will not. Domestic authority, like some other powers, is apt to be magnified on the weaker class. ...
— Junior Classics, V6 • Various

... within reach, there are some 130,000 volumes in the Parliamentary Libraries of the Dominion, 700,000 in the Universities, Colleges and Schools—all of which are necessarily of a limited professional class—and 140,000 in Mechanics' Institutes and Literary Societies. The grand total of library and prize books despatched to the Public Schools of the Province of Ontario alone within twenty-five years is over one million and a quarter of volumes—comprising ...
— The Intellectual Development of the Canadian People • John George Bourinot

... students and their parents, and the master was given enthusiastic help by them in all his experiments; above all he was loyally aided by his assistant, Fraeulein Nina Gorter. The Conservatoire authorities, however, were not sympathetic, and it became necessary to form a volunteer-experimental class, which worked outside official hours ...
— The Eurhythmics of Jaques-Dalcroze • Emile Jaques-Dalcroze

... perfectly aware that her visitor was of unknown Western origin, and a poor but clever protege of the rich banker; but she was one of a certain class of American women who, in the midst of a fierce democracy, are more or less cat-like conservators of family pride and lineage, and more or less felinely inconsistent and treacherous to republican principles. Bly, who had just settled in his mind to send her the rent anonymously—as a weekly ...
— The Heritage of Dedlow Marsh and Other Tales • Bret Harte

... parish, some wholly self-made, with no interest or knowledge of anything outside their own affairs, and almost as far removed as the labourers themselves from the ranks above. The Ellerbys were of another stamp, or a different class. If not a gentleman, Mr. Ellerby was very like one and was accustomed to associate with gentlemen. He was a farmer, descended from a long line of farmers; but he owned his own land, and was an educated and ...
— A Shepherd's Life • W. H. Hudson

... curses of Ireland at the time were the Penal Laws and the corrupt administration of Dublin Castle. Chesterfield determined to strike a heavy blow at each of these evil things. He saw that the baneful class ascendency which was engendered by the Penal Laws was as bad in the end for the oppressors as for the oppressed. He saw that it was poisoning those who were administering it as well as those against whom it was administered. ...
— A History of the Four Georges, Volume II (of 4) • Justin McCarthy

... possibly be a bid for pecuniary reward. Mr. Frohman, whose name is often unfortunately mentioned in connection with the sad, cruel, oppressive, commercial speculators in dramatic "goods," belongs absolutely and utterly to another class. It is ten thousand pities that the enthusiasm and real artistic fervor of this undaunted, farseeing manager should be shadowed by this association. Mr. Frohman actually sent Miss Marie Tempest and her English company over from London for a short stay ...
— Ainslee's, Vol. 15, No. 6, July 1905 • Various

... a series of nearly uniform size, written by some of the first pens of the age. In every one of them a vast amount of useful information is presented in a short compass. They are of that class desiderated by Dr. Arnold—"I never wanted articles on religious subjects half so much as articles on common subjects, written with a decidedly religious turn." They are valuable additions to Sunday-school and family libraries, with special reference to which they have been carefully revised ...
— History, Manners, and Customs of the North American Indians • George Mogridge

... which were abstruse for them, they were not so with regard to individuals, and already began to regard the party chiefs with affection or hatred, not on account of the interest which they supposed them to take in the welfare of their class, but simply because as actors ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... hole-in-a-corner show, of course. But Symonds is to be the all-around judge, except for the toy breeds. And Symonds knows collies, from the ground up. I am going to take Bruce over there and enter him for the puppy class. If he is any good, Symonds will know it. If the dog is as worthless as I think he is, I'll get rid of him. If Symonds gives any hope for him, I'll keep him on a ...
— Bruce • Albert Payson Terhune

... hastily, we notice many admirable selections from the best authors, and as the book is entirely fresh, the matter never having appeared in previous readers or speakers, it cannot fail to be a welcome addition to the books of its class.—Springfield Republican. ...
— Rollo on the Atlantic • Jacob Abbott

... Lawyers, as a class, play well; but their great fault is, they play too much for the galerie. The habit of appealing to the jury jags and blurs the finer edge of their faculties, and they are more prone to canvass the suffrages of the surrounders than to address ...
— Cornelius O'Dowd Upon Men And Women And Other Things In General - Originally Published In Blackwood's Magazine - 1864 • Charles Lever



Words linked to "Class" :   class Psilopsida, fraternity, teaching, Branchiopoda, Dicotyledonae, Heterobasidiomycetes, caste, Archosauria, taxonomic category, colloquialism, Equisetatae, Cryptophyceae, Acnidosporidia, Alismatidae, grammatical category, Hirudinea, Chrysophyceae, Asteroidea, Bryopsida, class Hydrozoa, estate, Charophyceae, subclass Actinopoda, Gnetopsida, subclass Amphineura, class Oomycetes, Anthoceropsida, Nuda, Selachii, Deuteromycetes, Pteridospermopsida, Tardigrada, Onychophora, yeomanry, Dilleniidae, first class, Lycopodiate, Anapsida, junior class, refresher course, Dipnoi, Rhizopoda, Cyanophyceae, Hominoidea, class Flagellata, Crustacea, Dibranchiata, class Hirudinea, class Onychophora, class Hexapoda, Chlorophyceae, class Gnetopsida, Pauropoda, syntactic category, Polyplacophora, Insecta, Chilopoda, Basidiomycetes, estate of the realm, Crinoidea, Hepaticopsida, Ulvophyceae, class act, categorise, Hemimetabola, denomination, amphibia, taxon, Hymenomycetes, Chytridiomycetes, Mammalia, Phytomastigina, class-conscious, Amphineura, Agnatha, Dibranchia, the three estates, Taxophytina, Gasteromycetes, Crossopterygii, Coniferophytina, Musci, Anthozoa, Hemiascomycetes, class Gastropoda, Zygomycetes, Elasmobranchii, orientation course, Arachnida, Schizomycetes, class Hyalospongiae, old school, class Chilopoda, count, Ciliata, sex, fair sex, compare, Tiliomycetes, extension course, Oligochaeta, subdivision Coniferophytina, subclass Malacostraca, Euascomycetes, Taxopsida, Scaphopoda, Cirripedia, Angiospermae, Synapsida, Teleostei, Bacillariophyceae, Eumycetes, elegance, course of lectures, Gastromycetes, catalogue, stereotype, Opisthobranchia, class Acrasiomycetes, adult education, Ciliophora, Gasteropoda, Xanthophyceae, graduating class, Malacostraca, Exopterygota, superfamily Hominoidea, instruction, Diatomophyceae, lesson, recitation, didactics, high-class, Gastropoda, subclass Hamamelidae, Pinophytina, catalog, class Bacillariophyceae, pedagogy, trade, Myxomycetes, Symphyla, Cnidosporidia, gathering, form class, Pantotheria, Commelinidae, Polychaeta, Cyclosporeae, Gymnospermophyta, Holothuroidea, Prototheria, firing line, Telosporidia, group, class Basidiomycetes, subdivision Cycadophytina, Trematoda, proletariat, propaedeutics, lecturing, Magnoliopsida, subclass Entomostraca, Placodermi, brass family, Channidae, subclass Homobasidiomycetes, Actinozoa, commonalty, peasantry, Zoomastigina, Larvacea, Ophiuroidea, home study, categorize, Flagellata, Coniferophyta, subdivision Ginkgophyta, Cephalopoda, domain, Entomostraca, labor, people, subdivision Cycadophyta, Ginkgophytina, Hepaticae, Cycadophyta, Acrasiomycetes, Caryophyllidae, phylum, coursework, Gnetophytina, Liliopsida, Gnathostomata, subdivision Pinophytina, Chelicerata, Diplopoda, Aphasmidia, Lycopodineae, Ascomycetes, commons, Actinopoda, collection, agriculture, brotherhood, required course, unitise, market, Psilopsida, woman, Eutheria, Cycadopsida, Gymnospermae, accumulation, division Gymnospermophyta, seminar, Euryalida, Metatheria, class Sphenopsida, Cycadophytina, class Tentaculata, Monocotyledonae, class Tiliomycetes, pigeonhole, Hydrozoa, upper crust, subdivision Taxophytina, class Scaphopoda, Infusoria, labour, class Schizomycetes, subdivision Ginkgophytina, Ascidiaceae, Ophiurida, Aves, Phasmidia, directed study, class Aves, aggregation, Rhodophyceae, Filicinae, Arecidae, Lepidosauria, cabin class, Thaliacea, Cestoda, discussion section, craft, Myriapoda, Discomycetes, commonality, Lycopsida, number, taxonomic group, Rosidae, Hexapoda, unitize, Sarcodina, correspondence course, Hyalospongiae, dichotomize, Ginkgopsida, league, Magnoliophyta, class Crustacea, Coniferopsida, society, stamp, violin family, Mastigophora, refresher, Bivalvia, orientation, Holocephali, size, Turbellaria, refer, division Anthophyta, division Magnoliophyta, conjugation, classy, Archaeornithes, Archiannelida, sodality, Euglenophyceae, superphylum, booboisie, elective, Homobasidiomycetes, dichotomise, ninja, Phaeophyceae, course session, Heterokontae, Echinoidea, conference, paradigm, class Magnoliopsida, section, Filicopsida, Anthophyta, Hamamelidae, Copepoda, class Asteroidea, lecture, Tentaculata, Scyphozoa, center, freshman class, class Cyanophyceae, woodwind family, propaedeutic, biology, Pinopsida, Plectomycetes, Chondrichthyes, Liliidae, elective course, Osteichthyes, isolate, Reptilia, bourgeoisie, underworld, declension, histocompatibility complex, educational activity, order, womanhood, Asteridae, education, Monocotyledones, biological science, Psilotatae, shop, Gnetophyta, Lamellibranchia, Oomycetes, Magnoliidae, workshop, tourist class, Pyrenomycetes, Dicotyledones, class Filicinae, form, Ostracoda, world, industrial arts, subdivision Gnetophytina, sergeant first class, ranalian complex, assemblage, Sphenopsida, Sporozoa, demimonde



Copyright © 2022 Dictionary One.com