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Class   /klæs/   Listen
Class

verb
(past & past part. classed; pres. part. classing)
1.
Arrange or order by classes or categories.  Synonyms: assort, classify, separate, sort, sort out.



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"Class" Quotes from Famous Books



... classic inspiration as it were in dreams, and who has painted the birth of Venus almost exactly as Poliziano imagined it. Again, we seize the broader beauties of the Venetian masters, or the vehemence of Giulio Romano's pencil. To the last class belong ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Second Series • John Addington Symonds

... if we keep clear of Christiania, is far from being formidable; and it will require a long the to enable the merchants to attain a sufficient moneyed interest to induce them to reinforce the upper class at the expense of the yeomanry, with whom they ...
— Letters written during a short residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark • Mary Wollstonecraft

... charge of the brigade while at Montauk, and much of his time was taken up in getting out necessary reports, and seeing to it that the entire camp was kept in first-class sanitary condition. ...
— American Boy's Life of Theodore Roosevelt • Edward Stratemeyer

... works in this class, there is no doubt that the Daphnephoria is the most technically complete. The procession is seen defiling along a terrace backed by trees through which the clear southern sky gleams. A youth carrying the symbolic olive bough, ...
— Frederic Lord Leighton - An Illustrated Record of His Life and Work • Ernest Rhys

... by inscriptions, as occasion demanded. Only when Roman supremacy had embraced or subjected to its influence all the countries of the Mediterranean was there need of some means by which those members of the ruling class who had gone to the provinces as officials, tax-farmers, and in other occupations, might receive the current news of the capital. It is significant that Caesar, the creator of the military monarchy and of the administrative centralization ...
— Introduction to the Science of Sociology • Robert E. Park

... even Mr. Davis was privy to the diabolical plot, but think it the emanation of a set of young men of the South, who are very devils. I want to throw upon the South the care of this class of men, who will soon be as obnoxious to their industrial classes as ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... but what results from that? Only this, that with the exception of a limited number of exceptionally enlightened men, equality is absolute between women and the remainder of the men; that this small class apart, inferiority and superiority are equally divided between the two sexes. But since it would be completely absurd to restrict to this superior class the rights of citizenship and the power of being entrusted ...
— The First Essay on the Political Rights of Women • Jean-Antoine-Nicolas de Caritat Condorcet

... fitted them for the conduct of such an expedition, but also enabled them to note and describe with accuracy the various interesting objects in botany and zoology met with in the course of their journey. It is therefore hoped that there will be sufficient to interest each class of reader. Aided by Mr. Jardine, senior, a gentleman of large experience in both Botany and Natural History, the Editor has been enabled to supply the generic names of the birds and plants met with; which, ...
— The Overland Expedition of The Messrs. Jardine • Frank Jardine and Alexander Jardine

... the cool scorn of the preceding moment! Hissing, spitting, as if poisoned by passion, he burst with the hate that his character had forbidden him to express on a living counterfeit. Wilson was shaken, as if by a palsy. He choked over passionate, incoherent invective. It was class hate first, then the hate of real manhood for a craven, then the hate of disgrace for a murder. No man so fair as a gun-fighter in the Western ...
— The Man of the Forest • Zane Grey

... except in his dreams; these are the leavings of the twenty-four franc prisoners; and as he eats and drinks, at dessert he cries 'Long live the King,' and blesses the Bastile; with a couple of bottles of champagne, which cost me five sous, I made him tipsy every Sunday. That class of people call down blessings upon me, and are sorry to leave the prison. Do you know that I have remarked, and it does me infinite honor, that certain prisoners, who have been set at liberty, have, almost immediately afterwards, got imprisoned again? Why should this be the case, unless it be to ...
— Ten Years Later - Chapters 1-104 • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... daughter and protect her from wolves—do you hear? And what is more, she is too good and true to go with you. She has a backbone if you haven't; and she'll see it her duty to stick to that lump of middle-class meat she is bound to—and she'll do her best, if she suffers to heart-break. It is she, the poor, little white dove, that you and I have wounded between us, that I pity, ...
— Beyond The Rocks - A Love Story • Elinor Glyn

... British flag. But you suggested that you might need other supplies. We can furnish your party with all the English goods they want, and there are first-class tailors ...
— Asiatic Breezes - Students on The Wing • Oliver Optic

... Ann persisted that she must consult Brother Goshorn, the antiquated class-leader at the cross-roads. Brother Goshorn was a good man, but Jonas had a great contempt for him. He was a strainer out of gnats, though I do not think he swallowed camels. He always stood at the door of the love-feast and kept out every ...
— The End Of The World - A Love Story • Edward Eggleston

... Lernanto a pupil, a learner (mas.). " Lernantino a pupil, a learner (fem.). an Lernejano a schoolboy. " Lernejanino a schoolgirl. ge Gelernantoj pupils (mas. and fem.). ist Lernejisto a school teacher. estr Lernejestro a school master (head teacher). [Error in book: Lernjestro] ant Lernantaro a class. ej Lernejo a school. et Lernejeto an elementary school. ar Lernejaro an university. ul Lernulo a learned man, a savant. " Lernulino a learned woman, a "blue stocking." ajx Lernajxo knowledge. il Lernilo intelligence (the). ind Lerninda worth learning. o Lerno act or action ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... people of sense, as well as condition, had prejudiced me to the married state; and, as I knew I could not bear it, surely I was in the right to decline it: And you see, my dear, that I have not gone among this class of people for a wife; nor know I, indeed, where, in any class, I could have sought one, or had one suitable to my mind, if not you: For here is my misfortune; I could not have been contented to have been but moderately happy ...
— Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded • Samuel Richardson

... on this subject, which a boy in Sunday-school once had. The teacher had been talking to his class about the beginning of this sermon on the mount. He had spoken of the sweetness of the words of Jesus, when "He opened his mouth and taught" his disciples. "How pleasant it must have been, ...
— The Life of Jesus Christ for the Young • Richard Newton

... appeared symptoms of the course, of the "rig," he was eventually to run. I could think of him but as the fils de famille ideally constituted; not that I could then use for him that designation, but that I felt he must belong to an important special class, which he in fact formed in his own person. Everything was right, truly, for these felicities—to speak of them only as dramatic or pictorial values; since if we were present all the while at more of a drama than we knew, so at least, to my vague divination, ...
— A Small Boy and Others • Henry James

... applications brought indignant citizens with six-shooters. Packard had occasion to note the merits as a lethal weapon of the iron "side-stick" with which he locked his type forms. It revealed itself as more potent than a six-shooter, and a carving-knife was not in a class with it; as he proved to the satisfaction of all concerned when a drunken butcher, who attempted to cut a Chinaman into fragments, came to the Cowboy office, "to forestall adverse comment in the ...
— Roosevelt in the Bad Lands • Hermann Hagedorn

... apparatus be got ready. They have to sit there, these old Parlements, uneasily waiting; as it were, with the rope round their neck; crying as they can, Is there none to deliver us? But happily the answer being, None, none, they are a manageable class, these Parlements. They can be bullied, even into silence; the Paris Parliament, wiser than most, has never whimpered. They will and must sit there; in such vacation as is fit; their Chamber of Vacation distributes in the interim what little justice is going. ...
— The French Revolution • Thomas Carlyle

... that she would have to meet people who were not of her class and who would shock her by their vulgarity. But his situation demanded that he should not disdain anybody. At all events, he counted on her tact and on ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... judge of the whole sex by their own wives," so Mr. Emerson believed women could understand metaphysics and theology as well as men. He discussed science and religion with his pupils, and the result was a class of self-respecting, ...
— Lives of Girls Who Became Famous • Sarah Knowles Bolton

... but that the spirit of its form shall communicate itself to the very disguise, and indicate the shape it hides from the manner in which it is worn. A majestic form and graceful motions will express themselves through the most barbarous and tasteless costume. Few poets of the highest class have chosen to exhibit the beauty of their conceptions in its naked truth and splendour; and it is doubtful whether the alloy of costume, habit, &c., be not necessary to temper this planetary music ...
— English literary criticism • Various

... having concluded, some observations upon his tale were made in due course. The sentimental member said that Lady Caroline's history afforded a sad instance of how an honest human affection will become shamefaced and mean under the frost of class-division and social prejudices. She probably deserved some pity; though her offspring, before he grew up to man's estate, had deserved more. There was no pathos like the pathos of childhood, when a child found itself in a world where it was not wanted, and could not understand the reason ...
— A Group of Noble Dames • Thomas Hardy

... store was established on Adeline Street, where lived a comfortable, salaried class. Here, his shelves carried a higher-grade and a more diversified stock. By the same old method, he drew his crowd. He established a delicatessen counter. He dealt directly with the farmers, so that his butter ...
— The Turtles of Tasman • Jack London

... flirtations are child's play. People have no time for making love; the men, in particular, are extremely busy. I am told that sort of thing consumes hours; I have never had any time for it myself. If the leisure class should increase here considerably, there may possibly be a change; but I doubt it, for the women seem to me in all essentials exceedingly reserved. Great superficial frankness, but an extreme dread of complications. The men strike me as very good fellows. I think that at bottom ...
— The Point of View • Henry James

... population, says Cato, produces the bravest men, the most valiant soldiers, and a class of citizens the least given of all to evil designs. . . . A bad bargain is ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... there have been many instances of a man descended from the lowest class of the populace reaching the highest rank. Kings, conquerors, emperors, have thus risen from the ranks of peasants and laborers, and the crown has been worn by men born to the beggar's lot. In the history of Japan only one instance of this kind appears, that of one born a peasant who supplanted ...
— Historic Tales, Vol. 12 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... following him, assumed that there would be concurrence from all sections of Irishmen. It must be "a free assembly"—no proposal must be barred in advance: it must be representative of "every class, creed and interest"—and in recapitulating these, he added the Irish peers. In regard to political parties and bodies, as such, he desired a very limited representation. The United Irish League, "the ...
— John Redmond's Last Years • Stephen Gwynn

... "first dark" for base-ball, and from first dark till Sunday-go-to meeting for drinking and dancing. Sunday you could go to the colored church (with benefit of white clergy) or you could go to the white church just like real class except you sat ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: Volume IV, Georgia Narratives, Part 1 • Works Projects Administration

... few resources still at our command were devoted to supporting your faithful servants of every class, and in saving them from execution. I have to regret the loss of the Chevalier de Margadelle, Raoulle, Tamerlan and the young Tellier, all of whom were carried away by their zeal for your Majesty's cause and fell victims to it at Paris and Versailles. I had hired ...
— The House of the Combrays • G. le Notre

... John Craven remarked that although Mr. Renold had gone over a wide field of subjects, he had practically confined his remarks to Messrs. Brown & Sharpe's establishment, and while he (Mr. Craven) was ready to admit that so far as high class work and sanitary arrangements were concerned, Messrs. Brown & Sharpe's were a model, they could not be put forward as representative of American establishments generally. As a matter of fact, many of the American workshops ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 832, December 12, 1891 • Various

... Gaspe portrays the life of this seigneurial class to which he himself belonged. The manor-house was usually a long, low, stone-built structure, surmounted by overhanging gables and a lofty roof. A wing was sometimes added at right angles, and always a group of strongly-built ...
— Old Quebec - The Fortress of New France • Sir Gilbert Parker and Claude Glennon Bryan

... persons except through the mouths of those to whom had been committed the dispensation of the means of grace! Whatever wind might blow, except from their bellows, was, to Mr Cairns at least, not even of doubtful origin. Indeed the priests of every religion, taken in class, have been the slowest to recognize the wind of the spirit, and the quickest to tell whence the blowing came and whither it went—even should it have blown first on their side of the hedge. And how could it be otherwise? How should they recognize ...
— Malcolm • George MacDonald

... pay it, for no other class o' min can do the wurruk. Why, it 'ud kill an American ...
— The Grain Ship • Morgan Robertson

... dreamy look came into his eyes. "We may make him President anyhow. But if he'd been educated—there wouldn't be any if or and about it. Washington and Jefferson and Madison belong to the rich and powerful class. Jackson is a yeoman like your father. But he'd be President. Boy, if he'd been educated! Nothing could stop him. Don't you see this is your country? This is a poor man's world. All you have to do is to train your mind. You've got to do this—you ...
— The Victim - A romance of the Real Jefferson Davis • Thomas Dixon

... was a great miser in Amsterdam; he lived in the most miserable way that a man could live in; wore nothing but rags; and having been formerly a seaman, his attire was generally of the description common to his class. He had one son, to whom he denied the necessaries of life, and whom he treated most cruelly. After vain attempts to possess a portion of his father's wealth, the devil instigated the son to murder the old man, who was one day found dead in his bed; but as there were no marks of violence which could ...
— The Phantom Ship • Frederick Marryat

... was born on a farm in Lorain County in 1825, was graduated at the head of his class from West Point. He achieved lasting fame in the siege of Fort Pulaski in Georgia, which other engineers had said could never be taken. Gilmore reduced it in two days by a feat in gunnery which changed forever the science and practice of that branch of the military art. ...
— Stories Of Ohio - 1897 • William Dean Howells

... more confounding to Fouchette when she was being overwhelmed with the subservient attentions of the young man's family; but the less she comprehended the more she held her tongue. They were of the class moderately well-to-do and steeped in politics ...
— Mlle. Fouchette - A Novel of French Life • Charles Theodore Murray

... water that the front of it is always getting dirty, and his ears and the ends of his trousers trail in the mud. A great authority has told us that, but for three white hairs on his shirt (upon so little do class distinctions hang), he would be a Cocker of irreproachable birth. A still greater authority has sworn that he is a Sussex. The family is indifferent—it only calls him a Silly Ass. Why he was christened ...
— Happy Days • Alan Alexander Milne

... forget how that grand old man met the disheartened boy. Speaking in the wise, friendly way which subdued the heart and strengthened the will, he made the half-hour spent with him the turning-point of my life. In conclusion, he advised me to enter the Senior class the following fall, thus taking a partial course of study. How many men are living to-day who owe much of the best in their lives to that divinely inspired guide ...
— Taken Alive • E. P. Roe

... character and give them the opportunity of developing their gifts for the benefit of the race. Humble origin had no deterrent effect on him. His most brilliant officers and men of position sprang from the middle and lower middle class, and taking them as a whole, their devotion never gave way, even during the most terrible adversity that ever befell mortal man. One small instance of admiration and sympathy is evidenced by the beautiful ...
— The Tragedy of St. Helena • Walter Runciman

... of fun, those young Druses and Maronites and Greeks and Mohammedans, so I try a mild joke on them, by pretending that they are a class and that I am teaching them a lesson. "A, B, C," I chant, and wait for them to repeat after me. They promptly take the lesson out of my hands and recite the entire English alphabet in chorus, winding up with shouts of "Goot mornin'! How you do?" and merry laughter. ...
— Out-of-Doors in the Holy Land - Impressions of Travel in Body and Spirit • Henry Van Dyke

... of 1812 his father removed to Gorham. At the academy in this town, then one of the best in Maine, Seargent was fitted for Bowdoin College, where he was graduated in the class of 1826, at the age of seventeen. After studying law for a year with Judge Pierce, of Gorham, he set out for what was at that day the Far West, in quest of fortune. Having tarried a few months at Cincinnati, he then made ...
— The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss • George L. Prentiss

... his way on board a ship, as a sailor boy, to San Francisco, and finally arrived at the diggings where his uncle was engaged in mining. In those early days of California mine digging the miners were generally a very rough class of men. So it happened that soon after Ned's arrival a great gruff "digger" offered to treat Ned to a drink of liquor, and became very angry because he refused ...
— Fun And Frolic • Various

... those who had the largest number of ships engaged in the whaling-trade. Something like the following was the course of life with a Monkshaven lad of this class:—He was apprenticed as a sailor to one of the great ship-owners—to his own father, possibly—along with twenty other boys, or, it might be, even more. During the summer months he and his fellow apprentices made ...
— Sylvia's Lovers — Complete • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... the popular idea of "crushing out militarism" once for all. It would be desirable, even if it were not necessary, to leave Germany as a first-class power. We couldn't disarm her people forever. We've got to leave her and the rest to do what they think they must do; and we must arm ourselves the best ...
— The Life and Letters of Walter H. Page, Volume I • Burton J. Hendrick

... sparrow, or the chewink. In adjoining counties, in the same latitude, and equally inland, but possessing a different geological formation and different forest-timber, you will observe quite a different class of birds. In a land of the beech and sugar maple I do not find the same songsters that I know where thrive the oak, chestnut, and laurel. In going from a district of the Old Red Sandstone to where I walk ...
— Wake-Robin • John Burroughs

... converted at a Moody and Sankey meeting, in New York, and started home on the ferry-boat, and there was a collision and he got drowned. He is of a class that think all heaven goes wild with joy when a particularly hard lot like him is saved; they think all heaven turns out hosannahing to welcome them; they think there isn't anything talked about in the realms of the blest but their case, for that day. This barkeeper thinks there ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... more than he does, girls are so silly," he said. He did not class Lucina Merritt ...
— Jerome, A Poor Man - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... as the last toilette of a prisoner under sentence of death. When they had completed their task, I heard a buzz of admiration round me. If the sisters were worthy of belief, they had never seen such a wonderful transformation. Those who were in the class-rooms or the sewing-room, were summoned to view and admire me, and some of the elder children were also admitted. Perhaps I was intended as an example for the latter, for I heard the lady superior say to them, 'You see, my dear children, the result of good ...
— The Count's Millions - Volume 1 (of 2) • Emile Gaboriau

... You're apt to think he's a fool at first. But that's a mistake. He isn't at all—I'd hate to lose his account. He makes machines in a small way, but very well and quite profitably. His father made a reputation for turning out high-class work and the son keeps it up. We got to know him at St. Mark's. Mrs. Jim says he's the only man of real charity she knows—not even ...
— The House of Toys • Henry Russell Miller

... variety, who didn't mind showing a spice of devil before they married and settled down. Lots of them didn't, and were no worse for it in the end. It had not occurred to him that Rosie would be different from others of the class, or that she would take in deadly earnest what was no more than play ...
— The Side Of The Angels - A Novel • Basil King

... the stationers to sell books was intended to prevent students of a profiteering turn of mind from buying books for resale to their fellow-students at a higher price, thus cornering the market and holding up the work of an entire class. In course of time, however, the book-dealers were permitted not only to sell textbooks, at prices still controlled by official action, but also to buy and sell manuscripts of other books, both those produced by local scribes and those ...
— Printing and the Renaissance - A paper read before the Fortnightly Club of Rochester, New York • John Rothwell Slater

... are these material results worthy of notice. Others of a moral and social kind force themselves on our attention. Four million negro slaves had been set free. Legislation, if it inclined to the advantage of any class, inclined to that of the poor. Its intention was to raise them from poverty, and better their lot. A career was open to talent, and that without any restraint. Every thing was possible to intelligence and industry. Many of the most important public offices were ...
— History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science • John William Draper

... said Mrs. White, pleasantly, utterly at a loss. Did people of the nicer class speak of furniture as if it were made merely to be useful? "But what a distinct period these things belong to, don't they?" she asked, feeling her ...
— The Rich Mrs. Burgoyne • Kathleen Norris

... the music hall. Girls of all ages, rosy from the air, and bubbling over with that gleeful excitement that comes from running to school on a fine autumn morning, hurried, skipped, fluttered by; from the hollow class-rooms came a quick drumming of voices; a bell rang; a voice like a bird cried, "Muriel." And then there came from the staircase a tremendous knock-knock-knocking. Some one had dropped ...
— The Garden Party • Katherine Mansfield

... mind a press criticism that appeared in a first-class London daily newspaper, with reference to a singer quite unknown to fame. It stated that "every note was pure joy." Could one say anything finer than this, and would not anything added to it but serve to spoil it? It epitomises ...
— Spirit and Music • H. Ernest Hunt

... great exactness the feelings that overwhelmed her now, whenever she let her imagination dwell upon the lives of women, of whatever class and whatever kind. Futility! The mournful composition, with its strange modern character, its suggestion of striving and confusion and pain, expressed as only music could express, the yearning and the sadness that burden so ...
— The Daughters of Danaus • Mona Caird

... goes on during the second and third hours of the morning, at the end of which each member of the class is expected to have their respective duties done and ready to put in the steam ...
— News Writing - The Gathering , Handling and Writing of News Stories • M. Lyle Spencer

... cruelty, or of dishonest silence, but remember the failing of human nature, and pity rather than blame a weakness which may be the cause of as much future sorrow to thyself, beloved Adelheid, as it is now of bitter regret to me. I have never concealed from thee that my birth is derived from that class which throughout Europe, is believed to be of inferior rights to thine own; on this head, I am proud rather than humble, for the invidious distinctions of usage have too often provoked comparisons, and I have been in situations ...
— The Headsman - The Abbaye des Vignerons • James Fenimore Cooper

... equal to the entire number of periodicals in France outside of Paris (796 in 1875), with an average issue less than half that of ours. The proportion of readers to the population, certainly in this class of literature, thus appears to be rapidly growing: and the change is most striking if we take, for example, that group of periodicals which are most purely literary and most remote from the mere ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - February, 1876, Vol. XVII, No. 98. • Various

... opportunity of speaking to the captain of the boy Gerrard, and remarked that he was far better educated than were lads generally of his class. ...
— Paul Gerrard - The Cabin Boy • W.H.G. Kingston

... who studies the advertisements in the newspapers will observe that they often subserve such perverse tendencies. "Educational" advertisements may be classified in three groups. Those of the first group are perfectly harmless (in appearance). To this class belong advertisements in which a teacher offers instruction to children. Since this is the ordinary form of serious advertisement, it attracts no special attention; there is nothing suspicious about it, and it is merely intended to lead to correspondence ...
— The Sexual Life of the Child • Albert Moll

... down the court and her head inclined a little toward the earth as though she were listening for the sound of a footstep. Not only the dreamer of dreams in that den of squalor, this Alban Kennedy was her idol to-night as he had been the idol of fifty of her class since he came to live among them. What cared she for his ragged shoes or the frayed collar about his neck? Did not the whole community admit him to be a very aristocrat of aristocrats, a diamond of class in a quarry of ashes, a figure at once mysterious and heroical? And this ...
— Aladdin of London - or Lodestar • Sir Max Pemberton

... factors hastened the breakdown of the old groupings. Economic interests came to the fore. In the {20} discussion of canal and railway projects, banking and currency, trade and tariffs, new personal, class, or sectional interests arose. Once, too, that the machinery of responsible government had been installed, differences in political aptitude, in tactics and ideals, developed, ...
— The Day of Sir Wilfrid Laurier - A Chronicle of Our Own Time • Oscar D. Skelton

... will suit me very well for your call, at any time you please. You are quite right to avoid Figgis; he is one of the small horse-dealing class who are a discredit to our country districts. Any further information is ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, January 19, 1916 • Various

... flourish in Bode's Berlin Ephemeris for 1788 his remarkable 'discovery ' of the papers of Thomas Hariot previously known as an eminent Algebraist or Mathematician, but now elevated to the rank also of a first-class English Astronomer. The next year, 1786, is celebrated in the annals of English science from the circumstance of Oxford's having accepted a proposition from Dr Zach to publish his account of Hariot and his writings. The Royal Academy ...
— Thomas Hariot • Henry Stevens

... professionally also they were to mark a new departure. In 1846 the Punjab was still a Sikh province, and the administration was only thinly strengthened by a sprinkling of British officers. Men, half soldiers, half civilians, and known in India under the curious misnomer of Political Officers,—a class to whom the British Empire owes an overwhelming debt—were scattered here and there, hundreds of miles apart, and in the name of the Sikh Durbar practically ruled and administered provinces as large as Ireland or Scotland. The only British troops in ...
— The Story of the Guides • G. J. Younghusband

... visitor descends into the heart of the rock upon which the citadel is built, and which until recently supplied it with water. Close by is the parapet from which the last of the Memluks made his desperate leap for freedom, and became sole survivor of his class so treacherously murdered by Mohammed Ali; behind, crowning the Mokhattam Hills, is the little fort built by Napoleon the Great to command the city, while in every direction are views almost impossible of ...
— Peeps at Many Lands: Egypt • R. Talbot Kelly

... of God, who misconstrue it and comment upon it according to their own fancy, and for their own honor and profit. While much that purports to be spiritual has not the Word as source and gives honor to the Spirit at the expense of the Word, the class under consideration profess to magnify the Word; they would be master interpreters of the Scriptures, confident that their explanations are correct and superior. In condemnation of this class, Peter says (1 Pet 4, 11), ...
— Epistle Sermons, Vol. II - Epiphany, Easter and Pentecost • Martin Luther

... which depopulated a quarter of the realm, ruined its commerce, weakened it in every direction, gave it up for a long time to the public and avowed pillage of the dragoons, authorised torments and punishments by which so many innocent people of both sexes were killed by thousands; ruined a numerous class; tore in pieces a world of families; armed relatives against relatives, so as to seize their property and leave them to die of hunger; banished our manufactures to foreign lands, made those lands flourish and overflow at the expense of France, and enabled them to build ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XIV., His Court and The Regency, Complete • Duc de Saint-Simon

... venture in a new silver mining country and a certain profit made; of a "misunderstanding," as he mirthfully explained it, now and then, with the children of the South; of horse swapping and a taste of the pearl fisheries of La Paz; of no end of adventures such as men of his class and nationality find every day in troublous Mexico. Twisty Barlow, an old-time friend with whom once he had gone adventuring in Peru, a man who had been deep sea sailor and near pirate, real estate juggler, miner, trapper and mule skinner, ...
— Daughter of the Sun - A Tale of Adventure • Jackson Gregory

... her whole nature reached out to it, in a proud and confident ambition. Nor had she any mystical demurrer to make. The originality which in some ways she richly possessed was not concerned in the least with the upsetting of class distinctions, and as a Catholic she had been taught loyally to ...
— Lady Rose's Daughter • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... see the bay horse? Such a one to go! He took a bit of ridin', When I showed him at the Show. [37] First prize the broad jump, First prize the high; Gold medal, Class A, You'll ...
— Songs Of The Road • Arthur Conan Doyle

... you belong to the class that you love," saith the rich man's sneer; "Work on with your class and be thankful." All that I hearken to hear, Nor heed the laughter much; have patience a little while, I will tell you what's in my heart, nor hide a jot by guile. ...
— The Pilgrims of Hope • William Morris

... passed, and that was always a pretty sight. A marriage is always an important affair in France in every class of life. There are long discussions with all the members of the two families. The cure, the notary, the patron (if the young man is a workman), are all consulted, and there are as many negotiations and agreements in the most humble families ...
— Chateau and Country Life in France • Mary King Waddington

... mix his blood with that of its inveterate enemies, and making himself free, as it were, of what they had been accustomed to call the old-established "corporation of tyrants." Another, and, it is to be hoped, as large a class of his subjects, were disgusted with his abandonment of the wife of his youth, for the sake of gratifying his vanity and ambition. There were also, we may easily believe, not a few royalists of the old school who had hitherto acquiesced in his sway the more easily, because he seemed destined to ...
— The History of Napoleon Buonaparte • John Gibson Lockhart

... complete liberty for each man to lead his life as he desires, provided only that in so doing he does not wrong his neighbor. Persecution is bad because it is persecution, and without reference to which side happens at the moment to be the persecutor and which the persecuted. Class hatred is bad in just the same way, and without any regard to the individual who, at a given time, substitutes loyalty to a class for loyalty to the nation, or substitutes hatred of men because they happen to come in a certain social category, for judgment awarded them according ...
— African and European Addresses • Theodore Roosevelt

... themselves in straitened circumstances. Yet out of this poverty, many open, generous hands would have been stretched to the widow and her ward had they permitted their want to be known. But they felt that they would rather starve than do this, for they belonged to that class which suffers in proud silence. Although they had practiced an economy that was so severe as to be detrimental to both health and character, their principal had melted away, and their jewelry and plate, with the exception of heirlooms that could not be sold without a sense of sacrilege, had been ...
— The Earth Trembled • E.P. Roe

... at a later period civil society was gradually organising itself on that hierarchical model which we know as feudalism, the Church, in the persons of its officers, was tending to become not so much the counterpart of the State as an integral part of it. For the clergy, as being the only educated class, were used by the Kings as civil administrators, and on the great officials of the Church were bestowed extensive estates which should make them a counterpoise to the secular nobles. In theory the ...
— The Church and the Empire - Being an Outline of the History of the Church - from A.D. 1003 to A.D. 1304 • D. J. Medley

... professional player the game in the larger towns took on a new lease of life, but in the smaller places where they could not afford the expense necessary to the keeping of a first-class team it ceased to be the main attraction and interest was centered in the doings of the teams ...
— A Ball Player's Career - Being the Personal Experiences and Reminiscensces of Adrian C. Anson • Adrian C. Anson

... having safely conducted this Pearl of Jeunes Personnes Bien Elevees out to the old Qui Hai. I have been charged with some few necessary explanations and negotiations, the delivery of some presents, and, when I have visited this first-class institute, enjoying all the attractions of the Jardin Anglais and the Promenade du Lac, I shall flee these tranquil slopes of the Pennine Alps. Incidentally, the records of Mademoiselle Euphrosyne will confirm the very ...
— A Fascinating Traitor • Richard Henry Savage

... exclaimed Charles. "The citizens will learn then why I have not enlisted, and I shall, moreover, be able to earn money for the country. I shall certainly get pupils, for my teachers are pleased with me, and I am already in the first class. I can give lessons in Latin, Greek, mathematics, and history; I have good testimonials, and, for the sake of the noble object I have in view, parents will assuredly intrust their children to me, and pay me well ...
— NAPOLEON AND BLUCHER • L. Muhlbach

... who come by first-class Bikaniri camels, for the better sort are rare, hard held to, and only to be bought up patiently by twos and ones. Fourteen of them in one string, each fit that instant for a distance-race with death itself, ...
— Guns of the Gods • Talbot Mundy

... fact that we owe a large proportion of our knowledge of planetary detail to the work of enthusiastic amateur observers. In this Society, indeed, nearly all the best observational work was done by the non-professional class; and when, as the result of their systematic and painstaking work, they noted on their planetary drawings some lines or markings which had not previously been recorded, one would have thought their original work would ...
— To Mars via The Moon - An Astronomical Story • Mark Wicks

... forty policemen, every one of them a Jew! It was the most effective possible answer; and incidentally it was an object-lesson to our people, whose greatest need it is to learn that there must be no division by class hatred, whether this hatred be that of creed against creed, nationality against nationality, section against section, or men of one social or industrial condition against men of another social and industrial condition. We must ever judge each individual on his own ...
— Theodore Roosevelt - An Autobiography by Theodore Roosevelt • Theodore Roosevelt

... was highly pleased with the cooking arrangements. There was a first-class gasolene stove, and the kitchen was fitted with all sorts of ...
— The Rover Boys on the River - The Search for the Missing Houseboat • Arthur Winfield

... To this class belongs the interesting phenomenon that we very frequently meet fools who never do anything foolish. It is not true that these are simply misjudged, and only appear to be foolish. They are really ...
— Robin Hood • J. Walker McSpadden

... That'll do. Chip of the old block after all," the trainer said, with evident relish. "Well then, since you do care for horses as you ought to, Sir Richard, we'll just make you free of this establishment. About the most first-class private establishment in England, sir, though I say it that have run the concern pretty well single-handed for the best part of the last fifteen years—make you free of it right away, sir. And, look you, when you've got hold, don't you ...
— The History of Sir Richard Calmady - A Romance • Lucas Malet

... alas! To their own bards I leave the mystic class; In vain shall one, and not a gifted man, Attempt to sing of this enlightened clan: I know no Word, boast no directing Sign, And not one Token of the race is mine; Whether with Hiram, that wise widow's son, They came from Tyre to royal Solomon, Two pillars raising by their ...
— The Borough • George Crabbe

... being called while it is still dark, and being obliged to dress by artificial light. As I laced my boots by the flame of the candle in the dusk before the dawn, I felt a sensation I used to experience at school, when they lit the class-room gas in the early twilight of a winter afternoon—a sensation of the sadness and futility ...
— Tell England - A Study in a Generation • Ernest Raymond

... teaching will inaugurate the period of humanity's manhood. It can be made an endless period of rapid developments in True civilization. All the developments must grow out of the true conception of human beings as constituting the time-binding class of life, and so the work must begin with a campaign of education wide enough to embrace the world. The cooperation of all educational agencies—the home, the school, the church, the press—must be enlisted to make known the fundamental truth concerning the nature of ...
— Manhood of Humanity. • Alfred Korzybski

... bells of the church of St. Mary le Bow in Cheapside. So far back as Ben Jonson's time (Eastward Ho, I, ii, 36) it was the mark of the unfashionable middle-class citizen to live in this quarter. A "wit" in Queen Anne's day would have scorned ...
— The Rape of the Lock and Other Poems • Alexander Pope

... must be of the same town or tribe, and of the same class or position; the former must be somewhat less than twenty-four years of age, the latter eighteen. The consent of the parents and chiefs of the tribes was ...
— Primitive Love and Love-Stories • Henry Theophilus Finck

... an opportunity to speak almost for the first time. He was standing between the two Misses Bullsom, and already they had approved of him. He was distinctly of a different class from the casual visitors whom their father was in the habit of introducing into ...
— A Prince of Sinners • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... billiard saloon. Fortunately for him the young fellows with whom he was in the habit of playing were all townsmen, clerks, the sons of the richer tradesmen, or of men who owned fishing-boats or trading vessels, and others of that class—not, indeed, as Frank had said, the sort of men whom Colonel Wyatt would have cared for his son to have associated with—but harmless young fellows who frequented the billiard-rooms as a source of amusement and not of profit, and who therefore had ...
— Through Russian Snows - A Story of Napoleon's Retreat from Moscow • G. A Henty

... of galleys of the first class in Xerxes's fleet was more than twelve hundred, a number abundantly sufficient to justify the apprehensions of Artabanus that no harbor would be found capacious enough to shelter them in the event of a sudden storm. The line which they formed on this occasion, ...
— Xerxes - Makers of History • Jacob Abbott

... replacement nuts by the dealers in California's best grade. It is not safe to endorse the view that any waste or abandoned land may be converted into successful walnut orchards, though such lands may in due time produce trees that will bear nuts. A first-class walnut orchard can only be produced upon first-class land, deep, fertile soil, a low water table, an open subsoil, with choice varieties, grafted upon the most suitable stock and then ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Second Annual Meeting - Ithaca, New York, December 14 and 15, 1911 • Northern Nut Growers Association

... I guess you military men know that we doctors are in a sort of class with yourselves when it comes ...
— The Diamond Cross Mystery - Being a Somewhat Different Detective Story • Chester K. Steele

... Was it a tiger? Was it a crocodile? The Provencal had not enough education to know in what sub-species he ought to class the intruder; but his terror was all the greater because his ignorance made it vague. He endured the cruel trial of listening, of striving to catch the peculiarties of this breathing without losing one of its inflections, and without daring to make ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 3 • Various

... the various forms of leucocytes one from another, and if possible to assign different places of origin to these different kinds. There now suddenly appears an endeavour to bring all the white blood corpuscles into one class, and to regard the different forms as different stages merely of the same kind of cells. The following sections will show that this tendency is ...
— Histology of the Blood - Normal and Pathological • Paul Ehrlich

... The class sympathies which, false as they are, are the truest things in so many men, broke out of Syme before he could ...
— The Man Who Was Thursday - A Nightmare • G. K. Chesterton

... preparations were evidently made for the reception of another prisoner. Then it was, as Abiram appeared, pale, terrified, and tottering beneath a load of detected guilt, that the younger members of the family were first apprised that he still belonged to the class of the living. A general and superstitious impression had spread among them, that his crime had been visited by a terrible retribution from Heaven; and they now gazed at him, as at a being who belonged rather to another world, ...
— The Prairie • J. Fenimore Cooper

... Sensibility," published in 1811; but she had already written "Northanger Abbey" and "Pride and Prejudice," although they were not published until years afterward. No one supposed her to be more than an every-day bright and observant young lady. Like other English girls of her class, it was her habit to sit in the drawing-room with the ladies of the family after eleven o'clock each day, ready to receive visitors. Instead of having needle-work in her hand, Jane had a pen, which was often dropped just in ...
— Lippincott's Magazine Of Popular Literature And Science, Old Series, Vol. 36—New Series, Vol. 10, July 1885 • Various

... to feel as insecure from the brutal violence and diabolical acts of the kidnapper, as are the unhappy creatures who people the shores of Africa. Ruffians from the other side of the Slave-line, aided by professional kidnappers on our own soil, a class of men whose 'occupation' until lately, had been 'gone,' are continually prowling through the community, and every now and then seizing and carrying away their prey. As a specimen of the boldness, though fortunately, not of the success always with which these wretches prosecute their nefarious ...
— The Underground Railroad • William Still

... neighboring parishes, sunk in the barbarism of English village-life of that day, of which Cowper's village of Olney was an example. But this work did not go on as smoothly as the sale of Coelebs: it at once aroused opposition from the large class who do not like to see old ruts abandoned, and was branded as Methodism—an epithet that was then freely used as an extinguisher for anything novel, and was a "bugaboo" of whose terrors we can have in this day little conception. Hannah was accused of endeavoring ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. July, 1878. • Various

... and cosmopolitan, like most of his class, but a Frenchman, or, more likely from his accent, a Swiss. "I never saw the ...
— The Passenger from Calais • Arthur Griffiths

... victim was an aide, Lieutenant Haberton, so to call him. He was a good soldier—as gallant a chap as ever wore spurs; but he had an intolerable weakness: he was a lady-killer, and like most of his class, even in those days, eager that all should know it. He never tired of relating his amatory exploits, and I need not say how dismal that kind of narrative is to all but the narrator. It would be dismal even if sprightly ...
— The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, Volume 8 - Epigrams, On With the Dance, Negligible Tales • Ambrose Bierce

... sailors of the ships lying at the Nore broke into mutiny on the 20th of May, their ringleader being a seaman of the name of Richard Parker, one of a class of men denominated sea-lawyers. The delegates drew up a statement of demands containing eight articles, most of which were perfectly impossible, and the Admiralty replied by pointing out the concessions the Legislature had recently made, and refusing to accede to ...
— By Conduct and Courage • G. A. Henty

... bad and not good; not merely the bigotry of every sect and party; but that mere restless love of new excitements, and that dull fear and suspicion of new truths, and even of old truths in new words, which beset the uneducated of every rank and class, and in no age more than in our own? And therefore I must ask, in sober sadness, how long would His influence last? It lasted, we know, in Judea of old, for some three years. And then—. But I am not going to say that any such tragedy is possible now. It would be an insult to Him; an insult ...
— All Saints' Day and Other Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... of her mistress. She was "little Annie" no longer, but a well-grown, sensible lass of sixteen, who thought: herself a woman, able to do all that any woman might do. She was willing even to put on the thick muslin cap of her class if her mistress would have consented that she should so disguise herself ...
— Allison Bain - By a Way she knew not • Margaret Murray Robertson

... with the old feudal divinities in order to form triads were not all of the same class. Goddesses, especially, were made to order, and might often be described as grammatical, so obvious is the linguistic device to which they owe their being. From Ra, Amon, Horus, Sobku, female Ras, Anions, Horuses, and Sobkus were derived, by the addition ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 1 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... of its class has ever been issued that contains so much valuable information, presented with such felicity and charm. The colored plates are true to nature. By their aid alone any bird illustrated may be readily identified. Sportsmen ...
— Marcia Schuyler • Grace Livingston Hill Lutz

... "and I must confess that, though not a temperance man myself, I never feel quite comfortable about it when I see clergymen taking wine freely at public dinners and private parties. It is not a good example, to say the least of it; and if there is a class of men in the community to whom we have some right to look for a good example, it is the class chosen and set apart to the ...
— Danger - or Wounded in the House of a Friend • T. S. Arthur

... frigates and three sloops of our class were stationed on the outskirts of the fleet, whipping them in as it were. We made Madeira in fourteen days, looked in, but did not anchor; superb island—magnificent mountains—white town,—and all very fine, but nothing ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott

... among their women. She had, for instance, later, read Laotze's Tao-teh-king, and been impressed by his tranquil elevation above the petty ills and concerns of life and the flesh. Her father, like all the ruling class, regarded Taoism—which had, indeed, degenerated into a mass of nonsense about the transmutation of base metals into gold and the elixir of life—with contempt. But this seemed to her no depreciation of the Greatly Eminent One or his ...
— Java Head • Joseph Hergesheimer

... and the limits of uncertainty, whether First, Second, Third or Fourth Degree. It advances in jumps—but on a finer plotting of the curve, you can see that each jump represents a vast series of smaller jumps. That is, there is Class A, B, C, D, and so forth Uncertainty of the First Degree. Now Class A First Degree Uncertainty involves only the deepest, broadest principles. Only they break down. One of these is the law of the speed ...
— The Ultimate Weapon • John Wood Campbell

... disappearing in pasture, and farming land, and forest. The village commons were being "enclosed" by local potentates. Monopolies of the natural resources of all wealth, the inalienable dower of the people at large, were working their inevitable consequences. Below the wealthy class, which was rising to the top of society, there was forming at the bottom a new and unheard-of social stratum, the settlings of the struggle for existence; a deposit of the feebleness and ignorance and innocence of the people. In the loss of the old sense of a commonwealth, ...
— The Right and Wrong Uses of the Bible • R. Heber Newton

... respects, my respects! Ha! ha! ha! Excellent, first-class! Officers, some people hunt by day, but you by night! The hunting was good; I have seen the game. Pluck, pluck the gentry, peel them well; bridle them, for the gentry sometimes kick! I congratulate you, Major, that you have caught the young Count; he is a ...
— Pan Tadeusz • Adam Mickiewicz

... many years ago themselves published histories of their lines, but most of these attempts were of little value, as they were always too laudatory and one-sided and evidently were usually written for political purposes. The best of this class of railroad histories was a book issued by the Pennsylvania Railroad many years ago, giving a record (largely statistical) of the growth and development of its lines. But this book has been long out of print and covers the ...
— The Railroad Builders - A Chronicle of the Welding of the States, Volume 38 in The - Chronicles of America Series • John Moody

... The class of Bohemians referred to in this book are not a race of today, they have existed in all climes and ages, and can claim an illustrious descent. In ancient Greece, to go no farther back in this genealogy, ...
— Bohemians of the Latin Quarter • Henry Murger

... apportioning to each school subject its part of the time devoted to the curriculum. Thus, we speak of five recitations in arithmetic, three in music, or two in drawing, having in mind merely the number of times the class meets for instruction in a particular school study. A recitation here means no more than a class-period, a more or less arbitrary device for controlling the teacher's and pupils' distribution of energy among the various ...
— The Recitation • George Herbert Betts

... boy?" said Meredith, joining the group about Harkless's chair. "Those fellows are Sophomores, class of heaven knows what. Aren't you ...
— The Gentleman From Indiana • Booth Tarkington

... "lives in his memory, I doubt not, through all the noisy carols of the singing season; so I remember the little songs my mother sang to me when I was old enough to run about, and had not outgrown the rhymes of the nursery." He enjoyed writing poems for the yearly meetings held by his college class long after their graduation, and he made several contributions to the Harvard Collegian. Just once in these early years had his fame traveled far, and that was the occasion when he wrote Old Ironsides. The frigate Constitution that had served the country so well was to be done away ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 7 • Charles H. Sylvester

... days that immediately followed the freshman parade and the burlesque game of baseball with the rival class, the work before Will Phelps and his room-mate settled more deeply into its regular grooves. The novelty of the new life was now gone and to Will it almost seemed that ages had passed since he had been a member of the household in Sterling. His vision of the hilltops from his bedroom window ...
— Winning His "W" - A Story of Freshman Year at College • Everett Titsworth Tomlinson

... two sides to the case, of course, and it is a credit to good manners that there is scarcely ever any friction in stores and shops of the first class. Salesmen and women are usually persons who are both patient and polite, and their customers are most often ladies in fact as well as "by courtesy." Between those before and those behind the counters, there has sprung up in many instances a relationship of mutual goodwill and friendliness. ...
— Etiquette • Emily Post

... crying need for a strenuous, intellectual renewal, than the consideration of that vast mass of useless, uncomfortable, under-educated, under-trained, and altogether pitiable people we contemplate when we use that inaccurate and misleading term, the Lower Middle Class. A great proportion of the lower middle class should properly be assigned to the unemployed and the unemployable." And that is the moral we may lay to heart from the presentation of these three quite lovable and quite futile draper's assistants. Their stories are told without didacticism; ...
— H. G. Wells • J. D. Beresford

... bowed politely in apology. I laughed and passed on. But I thought it a little strange, for neither of the men had the slightest indication of gypsiness. I met the one who had said sarishan ba again, soon after. I found that he and the one of the wagon were not of gypsy blood, but of a class not uncommon in England, who, be they rich or poor, are affected towards gypsies. The wealthy one lived with a gypsy mistress; the poorer one had a gypsy wife, and was very fond of the language. There is a very large class of these mysterious ...
— The Gypsies • Charles G. Leland

... and I don't much care. I've heard that there are sharks of all sorts here in Manila, ready to put up all sorts of games to get the easy-mark soldier's pay away from him. Probably Tomba and his friend belong in that class." ...
— Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines - or, Following the Flag against the Moros • H. Irving Hancock

... scanning the apathetic, stubborn maternal countenance, hardened beyond their wont. "You talk as if there had been some class war declared," she said, with obvious annoyance. "You know that Uncle Stormont would like nothing better than to be as nice to you as he is ...
— The Market-Place • Harold Frederic



Words linked to "Class" :   age class, Bacillariophyceae, coursework, class Sarcodina, Bivalvia, subdivision Taxophytina, class Lycopodineae, Anapsida, Crustacea, Crossopterygii, unitize, Gasteromycetes, Coniferophyta, upper class, taxonomic group, refresher, subdivision Cycadophytina, Prototheria, class Aves, Scyphozoa, amphibia, subclass Dilleniidae, Channidae, Archaeornithes, class Rhodophyceae, propaedeutic, class Dicotyledonae, group, Dicotyledonae, Cnidosporidia, Coniferopsida, Bryopsida, Myxomycetes, Holocephali, Taxophytina, fair sex, Dilleniidae, section, Phaeophyceae, classy, Teleostei, Echinoidea, working-class, Gastromycetes, lower-class, class Ciliophora, Ascidiaceae, dichotomize, Monocotyledones, elective course, Osteichthyes, Lycopodiate, Sporozoa, assemblage, Euglenophyceae, grammatical category, Dibranchia, Euascomycetes, extension course, Hepaticopsida, Acnidosporidia, Oomycetes, Branchiopoda, count, collection, violin family, Gasteropoda, Cycadophyta, class Cestoda, league, Plectomycetes, ranalian complex, domain, Monocotyledonae, Placodermi, Archiannelida, trade, isolate, Dicotyledones, Coniferophytina, division Anthophyta, Hominoidea, commonality, Chrysophyceae, woodwind family, class fellow, Hamamelidae, bourgeoisie, old school, Phasmidia, world-class, class Phasmidia, Deuteromycetes, class Oligochaeta, peasantry, Ulvophyceae, superclass Gnathostomata, demimonde, elegance, class Liliopsida, industrial arts, market, Psilopsida, superfamily Hominoidea, class Schizomycetes, seminar, Arachnida, center, Cryptophyceae, Polychaeta, Chytridiomycetes, Myriapoda, upper crust, agriculture, superphylum, teaching, Lycopodineae, Commelinidae, adult education, Diatomophyceae, Filicinae, class Crustacea, compare, class Hyalospongiae, labour, sodality, Rosidae, Heterokontae, Ciliata, Ophiurida, Polyplacophora, subclass Magnoliidae, Ciliophora, class Sphenopsida, subdivision Ginkgophyta, ninja, class period, Chondrichthyes, sex, Thaliacea, world, Pantotheria, Insecta, Basidiomycetes, Agnatha, pigeonhole, Rhodophyceae, commons, Cestoda, childbirth-preparation class, categorize, Angiospermae, gathering, Cephalopoda, underworld, Elasmobranchii, woman, class Gastromycetes, estate, Mastigophora, Sarcodina, the three estates, order, Lycopsida, Lepidosauria, class Larvacea, Malacostraca, Acrasiomycetes, class-action suit, orientation course, Zoomastigina, Synapsida, class Dicotyledones, superclass Myriapoda, propaedeutics, class Psilotatae, Tiliomycetes, Hyalospongiae, histocompatibility complex, Phytomastigina, class Bryopsida, Actinozoa, Homobasidiomycetes, grade, class Channidae, Ophiuroidea, shop, didactics, phylum, Sphenopsida, Gnetophytina, Rhizopoda, Anthozoa, Magnoliopsida, division Gymnospermophyta, Symphyla, Hemiascomycetes, Aphasmidia, Opisthobranchia, subdivision Coniferophytina, paradigm, Discomycetes, 1st class, Caryophyllidae, Schizomycetes, Cycadopsida, Magnoliidae, Heterobasidiomycetes, Hirudinea, Flagellata, catalogue, Crinoidea, proletariat, Hydrozoa, denomination, Asteridae, Ginkgophytina, class Crinoidea, Charophyceae, lower-middle-class, home study, Exopterygota, stamp, class Asteroidea, Holothuroidea, categorise, Diplopoda, Gnathostomata, Gastropoda, labor, fraternity, Anthoceropsida, taxonomic category, Infusoria, Gnetophyta, Chelicerata, brass family, class Onychophora, Chilopoda, class Charophyceae, Archosauria, Pinopsida, pedagogy, discussion section, Hexapoda, Arecidae, yeomanry, class Zygomycetes, Cyclosporeae, lesson, middle-class, declension, Cirripedia, Hepaticae, refresher course, Pyrenomycetes, Oligochaeta, conference, colloquialism, Psilotatae, Metatheria, refer, Reptilia, Ascomycetes, education, Magnoliophyta, people, second-class, biology, Larvacea, Telosporidia, elective, Entomostraca, Dibranchiata, Eutheria, Cyanophyceae, booboisie, subdivision Ginkgophytina, caste, lecturing, Lamellibranchia, form, aggregation, workshop, craft, womanhood, required course, Ostracoda, Eumycetes, Filicopsida, Actinopoda, Musci, Cycadophytina, course of lectures, class Pyrenomycetes, Anthophyta, syntactic category, catalog, directed study, Taxopsida, correspondence course, Gymnospermae, Trematoda, brotherhood, first class, class Musci, Pauropoda, recitation, educational activity, Onychophora, class Euglenophyceae, Liliidae, Tentaculata, subdivision Pinophytina, Amphineura, Nuda, course session, Copepoda, Scaphopoda, Dipnoi, Turbellaria, estate of the realm, class Polyplacophora, conjugation, firing line, Aves, number, size, Zygomycetes, Hymenomycetes, Xanthophyceae, class Ascomycetes, division Magnoliophyta, Alismatidae, Gnetopsida, Euryalida, commonalty, Pinophytina, Mammalia, lecture, accumulation, Hemimetabola, unitise, Equisetatae, biological science, Chlorophyceae, taxon, society, Tardigrada, Gymnospermophyta, stereotype, instruction, Pteridospermopsida, Selachii, orientation, dichotomise, subdivision Cycadophyta, Asteroidea, Ginkgopsida, subdivision Gnetophytina, Liliopsida



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