Online dictionaryOnline dictionary
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Bush   /bʊʃ/   Listen
Bush

noun
1.
A low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems.  Synonym: shrub.
2.
A large wilderness area.
3.
Dense vegetation consisting of stunted trees or bushes.  Synonyms: chaparral, scrub.
4.
43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946).  Synonyms: Dubya, Dubyuh, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush.
5.
United States electrical engineer who designed an early analogue computer and who led the scientific program of the United States during World War II (1890-1974).  Synonym: Vannevar Bush.
6.
Vice president under Reagan and 41st President of the United States (born in 1924).  Synonyms: George Bush, George H.W. Bush, George Herbert Walker Bush, President Bush.
7.
Hair growing in the pubic area.  Synonyms: crotch hair, pubic hair.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |
Add this dictionary
to your browser search bar





"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... little log-hut, not much bigger than an Indian lodge, and the patch of Indian corn now sprung out of the ground which is inclosed by the fence. This portion appears not to be of any use to him, as he has no cattle of any kind, unless indeed they have gone into the bush; but I think some of our men said that he lived entirely by the chase, and that he ...
— The Settlers in Canada • Frederick Marryat

... it well, about three miles back, but he's away pretty often in the North and at a settlement on the edge of the bush country. Don't know what he does there, and they're a curious crowd; Dubokars, Russians of sorts, ...
— Blake's Burden • Harold Bindloss

... is,' said the barber's wife, after beating about the bush for some-time, and with many injunctions to strict secrecy, 'this field belonged to my grandfather, who buried five pots full of gold in it, and we were just trying to discover the exact spot before beginning to dig. You won't tell any ...
— Tales Of The Punjab • Flora Annie Steel

... for cattle. Boards fixed upon stakes driven into the ground, without mat or covering, were our only beds. On Sundays, after we had washed the salt bags, and done other work required of us, we went into the bush and cut the long soft grass, of which we made trusses for our legs and feet to rest upon, for they were so full of the salt boils that we could get no rest lying upon ...
— The History of Mary Prince - A West Indian Slave • Mary Prince

... succeeded beautifully. The stinking coat had landed on the top of a small bush, about ten feet in front of the jeep and ten feet from the ground. The nighthound, erect on its haunches, was reaching out with its front paws to drag it down, and slashing angrily at it with its single-clawed intermediary limbs. Its back ...
— Police Operation • H. Beam Piper

... English.) We had now reached THE garden-chair; the directress sat down, and signed to me to sit by her, but I only rested my knee on the seat, and stood leaning my head and arm against the embowering branch of a huge laburnum, whose golden flowers, blent with the dusky green leaves of a lilac-bush, formed a mixed arch of shade and sunshine over the retreat. Mdlle. Reuter sat silent a moment; some novel movements were evidently working in her mind, and they showed their nature on her astute brow; she was meditating some CHEF D'OEUVRE ...
— The Professor • (AKA Charlotte Bronte) Currer Bell

... Scripture, but which yet characterizes all genuine religiousness; and this consists in the fact that the religious man sees {364} miracles of God in all that turns his attention to God's government,—in the sea of stars, in rock and bush, in sunshine and storm, in flower and worm, just as certainly as in the guidance of his own life and in the facts and processes of the history of salvation and of the kingdom of the Lord. In this idea of miracles, the essential thing is not that the phenomena and processes ...
— The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality • Rudolf Schmid

... fur rug which she carefully deposited at the foot of the tree; then for some minutes she and Fritz seemed to be having a kind of a game of hide and seek with one another, until she pushed him into a bush and commanded him to stay there. Suddenly dog and child darted at each other, and then, to Sir Edward's amazement, he saw his little niece seize Fritz by the throat and bring him to the ground. When both were rolling over one another, and Fritz's short, sharp barks became ...
— Probable Sons • Amy Le Feuvre

... bloom in immemorial shade. Squalor and splendour live here side by side. Grand Renaissance portals grinning with Satyr masks are flanked by tawdry frescoes shamming stonework, or by doorways where the withered bush hangs out a promise of bad wine. The Cappella Colleoni is our destination, that masterpiece of the sculptor-architect's craft, with its variegated marbles,—rosy and white and creamy yellow and jet-black,—in patterns, basreliefs, pilasters, statuettes, encrusted on the fanciful domed ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece • John Addington Symonds

... it there are about twenty acres of cleared ground, planted with manioc, cassava, corn, and fruit trees—principally bananas, beyond which is the virgin forest. Toward this we made our way, and, entering it, followed a bush path for about a quarter of a mile, until we reached a small open space. We had scarcely entered this when the three pretended sandalwood merchants simultaneously turned upon us, and, uttering a terrific yell, seized each of us by the arms, which they tried to confine behind our backs. ...
— Turned Adrift • Harry Collingwood

... cliff, forming, with the palisades, the circle of defence. The Indians lived in the area.] Tonty was absent, fighting the Iroquois; but his lieutenant, Bellefontaine, received the travellers, and his little garrison of bush-rangers greeted them with a salute of musketry, mingled with the whooping of the Indians. A Te Deum followed at the chapel; "and, with all our hearts," says Joutel, "we gave thanks to God who had preserved and guided us." At length, the tired travellers ...
— France and England in North America, a Series of Historical Narratives, Part Third • Francis Parkman

... school! It was called a "Young Ladies' Seminary." It was a fashionable, intellectual hot-house, where premature, fleeting blooms were cultivated regardless of any future consequence. But I was a barren bush! I never fashion-flowered into a profusion of showy blossoms. Aunt Patsey said that I did not reap the harvest of my golden opportunities; but pa, he growled and grumbled a good deal when the bills came pouring in, but paid them, and roundly swore that he was glad ...
— The Inner Sisterhood - A Social Study in High Colors • Douglass Sherley et al.

... to the important idea quickly. In applying for a position, do not beat around the bush, or say you "wish to apply" or "would apply". Begin, "I make application for ...", "kindly consider my application for ...", or "I ...
— The Century Handbook of Writing • Garland Greever

... was a plantation of young trees, on the other there was the open ground, covered with furze bush, of the village common. ...
— The Bittermeads Mystery • E. R. Punshon

... b. in the Azores, the s. of an officer in the army. He went to Australia, where he had a varied career in connection with horses and riding, for which he had a passion. He betook himself to the Bush, got into financial trouble, and d. by his own hand. In the main he derives his inspiration (as in the Rhyme of Joyous Garde, and Britomarte) from mediaeval and English sources, not from his Australian surroundings. Among his books are Sea-spray ...
— A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature • John W. Cousin

... general that the Emperor was wounded. It is asserted that several men in ambush had orders to wait their opportunity to fire at the Emperor, when he should approach; and when the Emperor did approach the bush wherein these men lay concealed, they all fired. It appears, however, that only one shot had effect. The Emperor finding himself wounded, instead of being discouraged, was reanimated to the combat, and entered into the midst of it; a soldier by his ...
— An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa • Abd Salam Shabeeny

... We been walk." (Walking back to Waccamaw) We gone. (See 'um! See their feet like the children of Israel in Green Pastures!) In man's house. Man say, 'Come out! You steal my turnip!' Brush arbor. Night come. Make camp. Way down the road somewhere! Make a big bush camp. All squeeze under there. Left Marlboro Monday. Come Conway Friday sun down! Hit Bucksville, hit a friend. Say 'People hungry!' Middle night. Snow on ground. Get up. Cook. Cook all night! Rice. Bake tater. Collard. Cook. Give a quilt ...
— Slave Narratives Vol. XIV. South Carolina, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... Papeiha." And with that he threw down the god at the feet of the teachers. One of them ran and brought a saw, and first cut off its head and then sawed it into logs. Some of the Rarotongans rushed away in dread. Others—even some of the newly converted Christians—hid in the bush and peered through the leaves to see what would happen. Papeiha lit a fire; the logs were thrown on; the ...
— The Book of Missionary Heroes • Basil Mathews

... spake the queen of fairies, Out of a bush of rye, 'You've taken away the bonniest lad In all ...
— Fairy Book • Sophie May

... he returned to Elizabethtown, Ky., and proposed marriage to a widow, Mrs. Sally Bush Johnston. The proposal must have been direct, with few preliminaries or none, for the couple were married next morning. The new wife brought him a fortune, in addition to three children of various ages, of sundry articles of household ...
— The Life of Abraham Lincoln • Henry Ketcham

... good will, however," she said slowly, "to find out what I can do. Perhaps neither you nor I know that, yet. Then I can make up my mind. I rather believe in taking what comes. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. Very likely nobody will ever care particularly whether I'm spoilt or not. And if I'm spoilt for one thing, I may be made for another. There have got to be all sorts of people in the ...
— The Other Girls • Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney

... forward from one bush to another until I was close to where the pair stood. I trod softly upon the grass, my ears strained to ...
— The Stretton Street Affair • William Le Queux

... hurt me. I see 'em come down de street—all of 'em on horses. Oo—h, dey wuz a heap of 'em! I couldn't count 'em. My daddy run to de woods—he an' de other men. Dey ran right to de graveyard. Too mucha bush been dere. You couldn't see 'em. Stay in de woods ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves • Works Projects Administration

... none. Perhaps there might be deer in the outer portions, but they never came in here. Although the scouts saw no evidences that wild-cats lived in the swamp, they could easily picture some such fierce animal crouching in this clump of matted trees or back of that heavy bush, watching their ...
— Boy Scouts on a Long Hike - Or, To the Rescue in the Black Water Swamps • Archibald Lee Fletcher

... you're bush'd, and must have the swag, [10] Walk into tattlers, shiners, and never fear the lag; [11] Then patter to all spicey, and tip 'em lots of fun, [12] And blunt you'll never want while you've got a pop-gun. [13] ...
— Musa Pedestris - Three Centuries of Canting Songs - and Slang Rhymes [1536 - 1896] • John S. Farmer

... the hilly path into a good road, paved almost like a street, and breaking from a bush a stout stick, which he used peasant fashion as a cane, he walked briskly along the smooth surface, now almost clear of the snow which had fallen in much smaller quantities in ...
— The Hosts of the Air • Joseph A. Altsheler

... the bullock's foot in the earth, where he hath trod then dig it up, and stick therein five or seven thorns on the wrong side, and then hang it on a bush to dry: and as that dries, so the bullock heals. This never fails for wisps. From Mr. Pacy, a yRoman ...
— Miscellanies upon Various Subjects • John Aubrey

... big room, among many relics and souvenirs, there was a little, dry bush. It was a Jericho rose, brought back by Mamsell Fredrika from the far East. Now in the Christmas night it began to blossom quite of itself. The dry twigs were covered with red buds, which shone like sparks of fire ...
— Invisible Links • Selma Lagerlof

... on others and the want of decision were not merely due to a constitutional mistrust of his own ability, but also in a measure to real lack of knowledge. The French and Indian War, being almost wholly "bush-fighting," was not of a kind to teach strategic warfare, and in his speech accepting the command Washington requested that "it may be remembered by every gentleman in the room, that I this day declare with the ...
— The True George Washington [10th Ed.] • Paul Leicester Ford

... Roses bloomed on every bush, and some of the great hawthorns up which the briars had climbed seemed all flowers. The white and pink-white petals of the June roses adhered all over them, almost as if they had been artificially gummed or papered on so as to hide the leaves. Such a profusion of wild-rose bloom ...
— Field and Hedgerow • Richard Jefferies

... in the veranda, after dinner; and Alexander, who sat on the steps, half hidden by a large syringa-bush in full bloom, flushed deeply at Pohlen's words. In a sharp tone of reprimand, ...
— Sister Carmen • M. Corvus

... say that he has a rooted objection to anything that isn't rags in the way of clothes. He entirely declined to take me across the river till I had rolled up my lace cloak and put it in a bush. And he won't really be friends with me again till we have both got back to the scarecrow garments ...
— Sir George Tressady, Vol. I • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... them up the slope towards Arwenack through the darkness that had now closed in. To tread his native soil once more went near to drawing tears from him. How familiar was the path he followed with such confidence in the night; how well known each bush and stone by which he went with his silent multitude hard upon his heels. Who could have foretold him such a ...
— The Sea-Hawk • Raphael Sabatini

... was fishing one day away up the river, squatting under a bush on a bank, when Peggy and Dr. Denbigh came and plumped right over my head. They didn't see me—but it wasn't up to me. They were looking the other way, so they didn't notice my fish-line either. They weren't noticing much of life as it appeared to me except their personal selves. ...
— The Whole Family - A Novel by Twelve Authors • William Dean Howells, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Mary Heaton Vorse, Mary Stewart Cutting, Elizabeth Jo

... to speak in whispers; and the amazed guests beheld a flushed, distressed face popped through the wide crack of the door, as rebellious Peace called in bitter indignation, "Remember, all the family haven't had dinner yet, and chickens don't grow on every bush!" ...
— At the Little Brown House • Ruth Alberta Brown

... was thinking of her son, who would have jumped over any furze-bush there—and the fir-trees too, according to her conviction; Dolly also showed her very beautiful teeth; but Faith looked ...
— Springhaven - A Tale of the Great War • R. D. Blackmore

... entertained by these wild people, prevented their chief from enjoying the full happiness arising from having thus regained his only son in safety. An ancient prophecy was current among them, that the power of the tribe should fall by means of a boy born under a bush of holly and suckled by a white doe. The circumstance, unfortunately for the chief, tallied exactly with the birth of the only child which remained to him, and it was demanded of him by the elders of the clan, that the boy should be either put to death or at least removed from the dominions ...
— The Fair Maid of Perth • Sir Walter Scott

... a tavern, kept by Tom Buchanan, near the cross of Paisley. The evening was enlivened by song-singing; and the landlord, who was present, sung the old song, beginning, "There grows a bonny brier-bush," which he did with effect. On their way home together, Marshall remarked that the words of the landlord's song were vastly inferior to the tune, and humorously suggested the following burlesque ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... his entire train, thoroughly dissatisfied and in high dudgeon. At first he threatened to take her by force; then he agreed to give her another day in which to make up her mind to go with him peaceably, and again he concluded that a bird in the hand was worth two in the bush. ...
— Brewster's Millions • George Barr McCutcheon

... them laugh. This he did, because the Indians are very angry when they are seene in their ceremonies. Notwithstanding one of our men made such shift that by subtile meanes he gatte out of the house of Audusta, and secretly went and hid himselfe behinde a very thicke bush, where at his pleasure, he might easily discry the ceremonies of the feast. They three that began the feast are named Iawas: and they are as it were three Priestes of the Indian law: to whom they giue credite and beliefe partly because that by kinred they are ordained ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of - the English Nation. Vol. XIII. America. Part II. • Richard Hakluyt

... response to his further question, seven prophetic visions were vouchsafed him, and interpreted by the angel for him. They typified the whole course of history up to his day, and disclosed the future to his eyes. In the seventh vision he heard a voice from a thorn-bush, like Moses aforetimes, and it admonished him to guard in his heart the secrets revealed to him. The same voice had given Moses a similar injunction: "These words shalt thou publish, those shalt thou keep secret." Then his early translation from earth was announced ...
— THE LEGENDS OF THE JEWS VOLUME IV BIBLE TIMES AND CHARACTERS - FROM THE EXODUS TO THE DEATH OF MOSES • BY LOUIS GINZBERG

... Greek art is Simplicity. The artist sees quite clearly what he desires to produce, and sets about producing it without hesitation, without self-consciousness, with no beating about the bush. Of course the more primitive and less conventional a society is, the easier it is for artists to be simple. In a complicated society simplicity and directness are apt to be confused with what is commonplace or even with the foolish. The simplicity ...
— The Legacy of Greece • Various

... Beseek, beseech, Beseen, appointed, arrayed, Beskift, shove off, Bested, beset, Betaken, entrusted, Betaught, entrusted, recommended, Betid, happened, Betook, committed, entrusted, Bevered, quivered, Board, sb., deck, Bobaunce, boasting, pride, Boishe, bush, ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... heads were now threaten'd with bonnets of green;[15] And, the facts of the case being everywhere known, No mortal would open his purse with a loan. Debts, bailiffs, and lawsuits, and creditors gruff, At the crack of day knocking, (Importunity shocking!) Our trio kept busy enough. The bush, ever ready and on the alert, Now caught all the people it could by the skirt:— 'Pray, sir, be so good as to tell, if you please, If you know whereabout the old villanous seas Have hid all our goods ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... corners and down thoroughfares, blowing good humor in and bad humor out. Birds of passage—song-sparrows, tanagers, bluebirds, and orioles—even a pair of cardinals—stopped wherever they could find a tree or bush from which to pipe a friendly greeting. Yes, spring certainly could not have begun the day better; it was as if everything had said to itself, "We know this is a very special occasion and we must do our share in ...
— The Primrose Ring • Ruth Sawyer

... not, like other powers, find a pretext for war in the righting of a supposed or real wrong. The birds of the Pirates' Nest were much too simple in their grandeur thus to beat about the bush. They went straight to the point. Without any pretext at all they declared war with a nation when they had a mind to plunder it, and straightway set about making prizes of the merchantmen of that nation; at the same time keeping carefully ...
— The Pirate City - An Algerine Tale • R.M. Ballantyne

... preach on a particular subject this morning, and shall choose my own psalm, of which I will give out the first line, and you will proceed and repeat the next as usual." When the time for psalmody arrived Wesley gave out, "Like to an owl in ivy bush," and the clerk immediately responded, "That rueful thing am I." The members of the congregation looked up and saw his small head half-buried in his large wig, and could not restrain their smiles. The clerk was mortified and ...
— The Parish Clerk (1907) • Peter Hampson Ditchfield

... supplied it accordingly; but if we would get at the very words as the Master himself spoke them, we must strike out this interpolation. And as soon as we have done so there flashes into light the identity of his statement with that made to Moses at the burning bush, where the full significance of the words is so obvious that the translators were compelled to leave the place of the predicate in that seeming emptiness which ...
— The Hidden Power - And Other Papers upon Mental Science • Thomas Troward

... had they entered the great tall gateway than they were set upon by a tribe of very lively goblins, for, from behind tree and bush there darted upon the unsuspecting girls a rollicking, frolicking band of boys—the boys' school having come to the grove to surprise the girls, and help them enjoy ...
— Dorothy Dale • Margaret Penrose

... himself shut in on every side. As he wished to see with his own eyes if the investment was complete, he ordered his troops to fall into rank on the top of the mountain, giving the command to Ravanel and Catinat, and with a pair of pistols in his belt and his carbine on his shoulder, he glided from bush to bush and rock to rock, determined, if any weak spot existed, to discover it; but the information he had received was perfectly ...
— Massacres Of The South (1551-1815) - Celebrated Crimes • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... tell thee, sweet, as well say to these apple blossoms that they need never be apples, and to that rose-bush against the wall that its buds need not be roses. In faith, we be far set in that course of nature, dear, with the apple blossoms and the rose-buds, where the beginning cannot be without the end. Our own motion be lost, and we be swept along with a current that ...
— Giles Corey, Yeoman - A Play • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... princess was missing, and in a moment the palace was like a beehive in a garden; and in one minute more the queen was brought to herself by a great shout and a clapping of hands. They had found the princess fast asleep under a rose-bush, to which the elfish little wind-puff had carried her, finishing its mischief by shaking a shower of red rose-leaves all over the little white sleeper. Startled by the noise the servants made, she woke, and, furious with glee, scattered the rose-leaves in all ...
— Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know • Various

... night last" said he, "I went with him on foot 12 miles; much of the way through mere paths and sought out in the bush some of the choicest. Had a meeting after ten o'clock at night in his house. His wife is a heroine and he will be on hand as soon as his ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 3, 1918 • Various

... slaveholders," might at small cost greatly augment their numbers. A single stanza celebrating patriarchal concubinage, winding off with a chorus in honor of patriarchal drunkenness, would be a trumpet call, summoning from bush and brake, highway and hedge, and sheltering fence, a brotherhood of kindred affinities, each claiming Abraham or Noah as his patron saint, and shouting, "My name is legion." What a ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... lovely, heavenly thing! Butterfly with quivering wing! Hovering, in thy transient hour, Over every bush and flower, Feasting upon flowers and dew, Thyself a ...
— The Pedler of Dust Sticks • Eliza Lee Follen

... Th' whin-bush rears o'th' moor its form, An' wild winds rush madly raand, But it whistles to the storm, In the barren home it's faand; Natur fits it to be poor, An 'twor vain to ...
— Yorkshire Lyrics • John Hartley

... terrors dire. But now the sun with more effectual beams Had cheer'd the face of earth, and dri'd the wet From drooping plant, or dropping tree; the birds, Who all things now beheld more fresh and green, After a night of storm so ruinous, Clear'd up their choicest notes in bush and spray To gratulate the sweet return of morn." (P. ...
— Pages from a Journal with Other Papers • Mark Rutherford

... off again, himself, as though he were going to seek them, but, as soon as he was out of sight, he hid behind a bush, and watched the road along which the woman he still loved so dearly would be brought dead or dying, or perhaps maimed and disfigured for life. In a little while a cart passed by, bearing a strange load; it drew up before the chateau-gates, ...
— The works of Guy de Maupassant, Vol. 5 (of 8) - Une Vie and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant 1850-1893

... August 1776, when the English army, under the command of General Howe, defeated the Americans at Flat Bush, in ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole, V4 • Horace Walpole

... loosed his hold, his great hand pawed over my throat till he had me by the scruff of the neck. He drew me over towards the spring, as one would draw a puppy. Then, still crouching in the fern, he hurried me to a single stunted sloe-bush which grew there. "Go down, you," he said, giving me a shove towards ...
— Martin Hyde, The Duke's Messenger • John Masefield

... away. I should if they b'longed to me. Think how many people would be glad to get them. May I go over in the field to play? I won't break one of Saint John's plants or touch a single lilac, truly, if I can just play where I can smell their smell as it comes fresh from the bush. We only get the wee, ragged edges of ...
— The Lilac Lady • Ruth Alberta Brown

... I suppose I'm on safe ground here? It won't go any further, of course; and it was so pretty! After she had pushed off in her canoe, you know, Braybridge—he'd followed her down to the shore of the lake—found her handkerchief in a bush where it had caught, and he held it up, and called out to her. She looked round and saw it, and called back: 'Never mind. I can't return for it now.' Then Braybridge plucked up his courage, and asked if he might keep it, and she said 'Yes,' over her shoulder, and then she stopped paddling, ...
— Between The Dark And The Daylight • William Dean Howells

... the shore, To finde our ships, yet thinking plaine that they had beene before. And thus with saile and ore twelue dayes we went hard by The strange vncomfortable shore where we nothing espie, But all thicke woods and bush and mightie wildernesse, Out of the which oft times do rush strange beasts both wilde and fierse, Whereof oft times we see, at going downe of Sunne, Diuers descend in companie, and to the sea they come. Where as vpon the sand they lie, and chew the cud: Sometime ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, v5 - Central and Southern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... displeasure, for Fanny, in spite of her worship of the child, could speak with no uncertain voice. She pulled up handfuls of the flowers, gleaming blue in the dark-green hollows. Later she carried roses from the choice bush in the yard, and, later, pears from her grandmother's tree. She used to watch for Miss Mitchell at her gate and run to meet her, and seize her hand and walk at her side, blushing with delight. Miss Mitchell lived not far from Ellen, in a tidy white house ...
— The Portion of Labor • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... been hit with irons, while my leather clothes were torn to rags. But, by-and-by, it came to me that I could get up if I chose, and when I looked below me and saw the sheer precipice, and that nothing but a bush stood between me and it, you may be sure I scrambled back to the road quicker than a man counts two. And there I lay, trying to remember what had happened, and what my duty called ...
— The Man Who Drove the Car • Max Pemberton

... Found my son-in-law was coming With his heroes and attendants, Heroes counted by the hundreds. "Should you ask of me the question, How I recognized the bridegroom Mid the hosts of men and heroes, I should answer, I should tell you: 'As the hazel-bush in copses, As the oak-tree in the forest, As the Moon among the planets; Drives the groom a coal-black courser, Running like the famished black-dog, Flying like the hungry raven, Graceful as the lark at morning, Golden cuckoos, six in number, Twitter on the birchen ...
— The Kalevala (complete) • John Martin Crawford, trans.

... let us play about the bush any longer. You have announced your intention of making no further attempt to discover the man who in your eyes merited the doom accorded to John Scoville. Your only reason for this—if you are the woman I think you—lies in your fear of giving further ...
— Dark Hollow • Anna Katharine Green

... they had gathered were brought out, and with these the screen of bush was thickened, and raised to a height of five feet; and when this was hung inside with a couple of blankets, it was agreed that they could get through the storm comfortably even if ...
— In The Heart Of The Rockies • G. A. Henty

... the heroic in him. On one occasion he was placed in such a position that he must choose between compromising a lady, or springing out of a third-floor window. Without a moment's hesitation he hurled himself out of the window. As luck would have it, he fell through a large laurel bush on to a garden plot, which was soft with rain, and so escaped with a shaking and a bruising. If I have to say anything that gives a bad impression of the man, put that upon the ...
— The Stark Munro Letters • J. Stark Munro

... of loosened gravel caused them to drop down by the path. The pantalooned figure came up, still whistling, and paused for a moment to take breath. Deering, throwing himself back from the path, grasped a bush. The twigs rattled noisily, and with a frightened "Oh!" the clown darted away, nimbly and fleetly. They followed a white blur in the starlight for an instant and heard the ...
— The Madness of May • Meredith Nicholson

... the voice of his mother, who now came quickly in exclaiming, "they are coming towards the house; away to the bush; quick." ...
— The Hunted Outlaw - Donald Morrison, The Canadian Rob Roy • Anonymous

... the entire party scattered themselves into the bush, each keeping in a straight line, searching as he went, and widening the field of search as his distance from the centre increased. There was no time to lose, for the shades of night had already begun ...
— The Lonely Island - The Refuge of the Mutineers • R.M. Ballantyne

... with head erect, and its little basilisk eyes upturned towards the lovely fly, crouched a camelion lizard; its beautiful body, when I first looked at it, was a bright sea—green. It moved into the sunshine, a little away from the shade of the laurel bush, which grew on the side it first appeared on, and suddenly the back became transparent amber, the legs and belly continuing green. From its breast under the chin, it every now and then shot out a semicircular film of a bright ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott

... little cubs to be secured? We shall presently see. The native beaters had added to their party a small bush-boy, who though twelve years of age was scarcely four feet high. He was a very ugly little fellow, but affectionate towards those who treated him kindly. Like all his race, he well knew the habits of the wild animals of ...
— Chatterbox, 1905. • Various

... so indeed as to cause a little rustling among the leaves. When the gate had been shut, and the wagon had passed on toward the house, the end of the umbrella disappeared, and then, on the other side of the bush, there came into view a sun-bonnet of the same color as the umbrella. This surmounted the form of an old lady, who stepped into the pathway by the side of the road, and walked away with a quick, active step which betokened both ...
— The Late Mrs. Null • Frank Richard Stockton

... valley having varieties peculiar to itself, showing what a factor isolation is in the evolution of new species. The Governor and his wife, and a young man who had specialized in conchology, plucked them from nearly every bush and tree; but my eye, being untrained in this kind of work, was ...
— Time and Change • John Burroughs

... pink and white one. Her eyes were of the common blue color. Her hair—well, it was a trifle wavy and more glossy than that of other girls, but—gluck! a stone broke her mirror into a hundred circling waves. Signe looked up with a start. There was Hagbert standing half concealed behind a bush. ...
— Added Upon - A Story • Nephi Anderson

... that this book is finished and Tom Brown, so far as I am concerned, is done with for ever, I must take this, my first and last chance of saying, that he is not I, either as boy or man—in fact, not to beat about the bush, is a much braver, and nobler, and purer fellow than I ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... excessive, the horses were bathed in sweat, the horsemen covered with dust, and the party seemed on its return from an important expedition. A man left the escort, and asked an old woman who was spinning at her door if there was not an inn in the place. The woman and her children showed him a bush hanging over a door at the end of the only street in the village, and the escort recommenced its march at a walk. There was noticed, among the mounted men, a young man of distinguished appearance and richly dressed, who appeared to be a prisoner. This discovery redoubled ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... grasping a shadowy bush above his head he growled that all this was possible, but that it was all in the bargain, ...
— The Arrow of Gold - a story between two notes • Joseph Conrad

... Captain Osborne sneered. He hesitated, glowering in the difficulty of thinking. "See here, Monsieur Duchemin—since you prefer that style—I'm not going to beat about the bush with you. I'm a plain man, plain-spoken. They tell me you reformed. I don't know anything about that. It's my conviction, once a thief, always a ...
— The False Faces • Vance, Louis Joseph

... the rocks, the peaks are sleeping, Uplands and gorges hush! The thousand moorland things are silence keeping, The beasts under each bush Crouch, and the hived bees Rest in their honeyed ease; In the purple sea fish lie as they were dead, And each bird folds his wing over ...
— A Victor of Salamis • William Stearns Davis

... than the one to which he had devoted his life. The light was growing stronger; he could hear voices in the nearest picket line, and the sound of a cough in the invading mist. He made a hurried sign to the on-coming figure to follow him, ran ahead, and halted at last in the cover of a hackmatack bush. Still gazing forward over the marsh, he stealthily held out his hand behind him as the rustling skirt came nearer. At last his hand was touched—but even at that touch he ...
— Clarence • Bret Harte

... damage had been done. The "rigged" lie detector test had unfortunately relegated Daniel Fry, "engineer," "missile expert," "part owner of an engineering plant," and interplanetary hitchhiker to the bush league. ...
— The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects • Edward Ruppelt

... snake. His thick hide seems to protect him. The "skin" of the rattle-snake or the "hiss" of the deadly "moccasin," are alike unheeded by him. He kills them as easily as he does the innocent "chicken snake" or the black constrictor. The latter often escapes from its dreaded enemy by taking to a bush or tree; but the rattle-snake and the moccasin are not tree-climbers, and either hide themselves in the herbage and dead leaves, or retreat to ...
— The Hunters' Feast - Conversations Around the Camp Fire • Mayne Reid

... in the garden, each bush seem'd to sigh Because I was going—and nod me good-bye; Each stem hung its head, drooping bent like a bow, With the weight of the water—or else of its woe; And while sorrow, or wind, laid some flat on the ground, Drops of ...
— The Indian Princess - La Belle Sauvage • James Nelson Barker

... sure Freshitt Hall would have been pleasanter than this." She thought of the white freestone, the pillared portico, and the terrace full of flowers, Sir James smiling above them like a prince issuing from his enchantment in a rose-bush, with a handkerchief swiftly metamorphosed from the most delicately odorous petals—Sir James, who talked so agreeably, always about things which had common-sense in them, and not about learning! Celia had those light young feminine ...
— Middlemarch • George Eliot

... the great silence; almost as still as grand'mA"re he was. For hours he would sit and look at Claire RenA(C) bending over her sewing, over her scrubbing, over the brightening of the pots and pans. Sometimes his shining black eyes seemed to lie down in his face, to be going away forever behind his bush of eyebrow. ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1920 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... 'if there's anything you don't need just now it's a queen. If I were you I wouldn't graft that kind o' fruit on the grocery-tree. Hams an' coronets don't flourish on the same bush. They have a different kind of a bouquet. They don't harmonize. Then, Sam, what do you want of a girl that's far above ye? Is it any comfort to you to be ...
— Keeping up with Lizzie • Irving Bacheller

... recollect right, among the honourable guardians of our lives, our liberties, and our property, there were none present belonging to the Whig or Opposition side of the House)—and after a considerable deal of beating about the bush, which I saw made the Chancellor of the Exchequer rather uneasy in his seat, I discovered that the prosing gentleman, whose name was Littleton or Thornton, was prattling about the Savings' Banks, into which it appeared ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 3 • Henry Hunt

... bleak uplands beyond the Himalaya tree-growth is very scanty, but in favoured localities willows and the pencil cedar, Juniperus pseudosabina, are found. The people depend for fuel largely on a hoary bush of the Chenopod order, Eurotia ceratoides. In places a profusion of the red Tibetan roses, Rosa Webbiana, lightens up ...
— The Panjab, North-West Frontier Province, and Kashmir • Sir James McCrone Douie

... 'the angel of the Lord 'or 'of the presence.' The dying Jacob ascribed his being 'redeemed from all evil' to 'the Angel,' and invoked his blessing on 'the lads.' 'The angel of the Lord' appeared to Moses out of the midst of the burning bush. On Sinai, Jehovah promised to send an 'angel' in whom was His own name, before the people. The promise was renewed after Israel's sin and repentance, and was then given in the form, 'My presence shall go with thee.' Joshua ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Isaiah and Jeremiah • Alexander Maclaren

... squire came running along, and his eye fell upon Jacob's rose. "Hallo," cried he with delight—"a moss-rose! Ha, ha!—the gardener said we had not even one blown in our garden; but here's a rare beauty!" and in a moment James Courtenay had bounded over the little garden gate, and stood beside the rose bush. In another instant his knife was out of his pocket, and his hand was approaching ...
— The One Moss-Rose • P. B. Power

... want of orthodoxy, and at this Elisabeth was not surprised. Possibly there are not many of us who do not—in the private and confidential depths of our evil hearts—regard earth in the hand as worth more than heaven in the bush, so to speak; at any rate, Felicia's mother was not one of the bright exceptions; and—from a purely commercial point of view—a saving faith does not go so far as a spending income, and it is no use pretending that it does. ...
— The Farringdons • Ellen Thorneycroft Fowler

... into was a lady and her two grown-up daughters, and a son of about five-and-twenty. They lived in a small house at Shepherd's Bush. My wages were very small, and I soon found out that they were a kind of people who keep up a great deal of show on very little means. Of course I had to be let into all the secrets of their miserable shifts for dressing well on ...
— The Unclassed • George Gissing

... thought, looking up through the overhanging branches of the big oak under which Fluff had stopped to rest. For a time she amused herself by braiding the long grass and weaving it about green twigs broken from an elder-bush until she had made a wide, shallow basket with a handle. Into this she put the violets and wild honeysuckle, resolving to take it home as a present to her mother. She put it carefully under the seat of the pony-cart, and then decided to search ...
— A Little Maid of Old Philadelphia • Alice Turner Curtis

... first reported to him by one of his nobles, on entering Scotland, he thus expressed himself: "Let God but grant me life, and there shall not be a spot in my dominions where the key shall riot keep the castle, and the furze bush the cow, though I myself should lead the life of a dog to accomplish it"; and it was in this frame of mind that he visited Inverness in 1427, determined to establish good government and order in ...
— History Of The Mackenzies • Alexander Mackenzie

... the man with questions. He told them that he had killed it the day before, really. It had been prowling for the last week or more about Kernore's bush; probably it was a ...
— Two Little Savages • Ernest Thompson Seton

... moment, from behind a bush where he had been thriftily burying a yesterday's bone, Smith the bulldog waddled out on to the lawn. He drank in the exhilarating air through an upturned nose which his recent excavations had rendered somewhat muddy. Then he ...
— The Girl on the Boat • Pelham Grenville Wodehouse

... terrace, into the shady, sun-flecked forest. A brown bird fluttered crying from a bush. Bess peeped into the leaves. "Look! A nest and four little birds. They're not afraid of us. See how they open their mouths. ...
— Riders of the Purple Sage • Zane Grey

... degree, or (if you will,) a pair of stairs above an ale-house, where men are drunk with more credit and apology. If the vintner's nose[24] be at door, it is a sign sufficient, but the absence of this is supplied by the ivy-bush: the rooms are ill breathed like the drinkers that have been washed well over night, and are smelt-to fasting next morning; not furnished with beds apt to be defiled, but more necessary implements, stools, table, and a chamber-pot. It is ...
— Character Writings of the 17th Century • Various

... I quite do. Pray excuse me for saying this, but it is best to be open." Florence felt that he ought to be excused for doubting her, as she did know very well what was coming. "I—I—Come, then; I love you! If I were to go on beating about the bush for twelve months I could only ...
— Mr. Scarborough's Family • Anthony Trollope

... to come. As I was coming up to it, a cloud passed over the moon: it was very dark under its thick branches. At first I noticed nothing special; but I glanced on one side, and my heart fairly failed me—a white figure was standing motionless beside a tall bush between the oak and the forest. My hair stood upright on my head, but I plucked up my courage and went ...
— Dream Tales and Prose Poems • Ivan Turgenev

... now, with crests of foam; the island coast opposite was a shadowy streak stretched across the feet of the sun. Oh, it was beautiful to stand at that open window in the freshness, listening to the robin on the bare lilac bush a few yards away, to the quarrelling of the impudent sparrows on the path below, to the wind in the branches of the trees, to all the happy morning sounds of nature. A joyous feeling took possession of her heart, a sudden overpowering delight in what ...
— The Benefactress • Elizabeth Beauchamp

... traitor, Sir Mordred, 'for I in no wise trust him.' And in like wise spake Sir Mordred unto his host. Then they two met, and agreed on the truce, and wine was fetched and they drank, and all was well. But while they were drinking an adder crept out of a bush, and stung one of the fourteen Knights on his foot, and he drew his sword to slay the adder, not thinking of anything but his pain. And when the men of both armies beheld that drawn sword, they blew trumpets and horns and shouted grimly, and made them ready ...
— The Book of Romance • Various

... he was preoccupied by more than women's mysteriousness; the conception of destiny lingered and faintly troubled him. It was as though he had been walking on a clear path through a vast and empty and safe forest, and the eyes of a tiger had gleamed for an instant in the bush and gone. Not a real tiger! And if a real tiger, then a tiger that would never recur, and the only tiger in the forest!... Yet the ...
— The Roll-Call • Arnold Bennett

... hazy, brooding mid-April mornings, when the farmer first starts afield with his plow, when his boys gather the buckets in the sugar-bush, when the high-hole calls long and loud through the hazy distance, when the meadowlark sends up her clear, silvery shaft of sound from the meadow, when the bush sparrow trills in the orchard, when the soft ...
— The Wit of a Duck and Other Papers • John Burroughs

... and board chimney, or oftener an old barrel, smoked and charred with the fire. Some of their roofs are covered with sods, and appear almost subterranean. One of the little hamlets stands on both sides of a deep dell, wooded and bush-grown, with a vista, as it were, into the heart of a wood in one direction, and to the broad, sunny river in the other: there was a little rivulet, crossed by a plank, at the bottom of the dell. At two doors we saw very pretty and modest-looking ...
— Passages From The American Notebooks, Volume 1 • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... mythology, invents his God very much as those detested impostors, the primitive priests, had done. He gives Humanity a friendly Power as they had endowed their tribe with a god of battles. Humanity at grips with chaos is curiously like a nigger clan in the bush. It needs a fetish of victory. But a poet's mythology is to be judged by its fruits. A faith is worth the cathedral it builds. A myth is worth the ...
— Shelley, Godwin and Their Circle • H. N. Brailsford

... is quite out of place unless he has, for the best reason and spirit of man, some significance. "Well, but," says Mr. Hepworth Dixon, [116] "a theory which has been accepted by men like Judge Edmonds, Dr. Hare, Elder Frederick, and Professor Bush!" And again: "Such are, in brief, the bases of what Newman Weeks, Sarah Horton, Deborah Butler, and the associated brethren, proclaimed in Rolt's Hall as the new covenant!" If he was summing up an account of the teaching of Plato or St. Paul, Mr. Hepworth Dixon could not be more ...
— Culture and Anarchy • Matthew Arnold

... against a rock and rested and panted, and let my limps go on trembling until they got steady again; then I crept warily back, alert, watching, and ready to fly if there was occasion; and when I was come near, I parted the branches of a rose-bush and peeped through—wishing the man was about, I was looking so cunning and pretty—but the sprite was gone. I went there, and there was a pinch of delicate pink dust in the hole. I put my finger in, to feel it, and said OUCH! and took it out again. It was a cruel pain. ...
— The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories • Mark Twain

... bush hath friends to meet him, and their kindly voices greet him In the murmur of the breezes and the river on its bars, And he sees the vision splendid of the sunlit plains extended, And at night the wond'rous glory ...
— The Man from Snowy River • Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Paterson

... Tia Juana business! A bird in the hand beats a whole flock in the bush! Give me my share now, Gerald, and you and Bob can do what you blamed please with your own part of ...
— Owen Clancy's Happy Trail - or, The Motor Wizard in California • Burt L. Standish

... the frontier, in about three-quarters of an hour. There I saw the most extraordinary-looking coaches, dating, I should think, from the time of Queen Elizabeth, with enormous reflecting-lamps, which produced a curious effect in the day, but doubtless are useful for bush-travelling at night. No sooner had we alighted from the train than—I cannot say to my surprise, for familiar faces are always turning up in unexpected places—the grandson of an old wheelwright at Catsfield came to speak to ...
— The Last Voyage - to India and Australia, in the 'Sunbeam' • Lady (Annie Allnutt) Brassey

... river that a brown woman washed his clothes on the stones, returning them with the buttons pounded off; but for every missing button there was sure to be a bright yellow, semi-indelible stain, where the laundress had spread the garments to dry upon a wild berry bush. ...
— From Place to Place • Irvin S. Cobb

... the bush, to find what game we are driving at," observed Middlemore, in an under tone, ...
— The Canadian Brothers - or The Prophecy Fulfilled • John Richardson

... been started he could not stop if he wanted to. In any case Mokus was forgiven, and it was with very kindly hands and many a pat that they unharnessed him from the cart and tethered him by a long rope to the stump of a stunted hawthorn bush, close to the remains of a little hut, which, with the old wall, had often caused the children much speculation as to when and why it was built there, and ...
— Kitty Trenire • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... never heard; while through the blazing hours of the day, and the stifling hours of the night, like a black thread woven into a tissue of gold, ran the ghastly fear which had been with her since the day when a schoolgirl had taunted her, and to which she had given voice near the poinsettia bush to ...
— Leonie of the Jungle • Joan Conquest

... tempt me. I had had some great disappointments with my native women, running wild again, and I could not bear my child having a horrid stepmother; and there was the glorious free bush life, and the horses and the sheep! But then I thought of you all saying Angel had broken out again; and by and by Fulbert came and told me that he was sure there was some ugly mystery, and spoke to Mother Constance, and ...
— Modern Broods • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... consider Sumerian sculpture or pre-dynastic Egyptian art, or archaic Greek, or the Wei and T'ang masterpieces,[1] or those early Japanese works of which I had the luck to see a few superb examples (especially two wooden Bodhisattvas) at the Shepherd's Bush Exhibition in 1910, or whether, coming nearer home, we consider the primitive Byzantine art of the sixth century and its primitive developments amongst the Western barbarians, or, turning far afield, we consider that mysterious and majestic ...
— Art • Clive Bell

... his father-in-law's flocks in the desert of Sinai, God appeared to him at Mount Horeb in a bush which burnt with fire, but was not consumed, and commanded him to return to Egypt and lead out his people thence into the land of Canaan. On his arrival in Egypt, the Israelites accepted him as their deliverer and after bringing ten miraculous plagues upon the land of Egypt before ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 3 of 8 • Various

... try to profit by my superiors. She has courage: I have none. I beat about the bush, and talk skim-milk; she uses the very word. She said we have been the dupe and the tool of a little scheming rascal, an anonymous coward, with motives as base as his heart is black—oh! oh! Ay, that is the way to speak of such a man; I can't do it myself, ...
— A Terrible Temptation - A Story of To-Day • Charles Reade

... and walked along the edge of the wall. I followed him; we both of us had our pieces of rope in our hands with which we tied the faggots. Of a sudden his foot slipped, and he rolled down to the edge of the rock, but catching hold of a small bush which had fixed its roots in the rocks, he saved himself when his body was hanging ...
— The Little Savage • Captain Marryat

... cleaning and arranging the two-room cabin, and tidying up outdoors, and in "grubbing sagebrush," a gigantic task, for the one hundred and fifty acres of Pierre's homestead were covered for the most part by the sturdy, spicy growth, and every bush had to be dug out and burnt to clear the way for ploughing and planting. Joan worked with the deliberateness and intentness of a man. She enjoyed the wholesome drudgery. She was proud every sundown of the little ...
— The Branding Iron • Katharine Newlin Burt

... establish themselves so far from home, instead of going to America. As a whole the system worked satisfactorily; the men were as much prisoners as were the inmates of the jail, for they knew well enough that were they to leave the farmers and take to the bush they would remain free but a short time, being either killed or handed over by the blacks, and in the latter case they would be severely punished and set to prison work in irons, with labor very much more severe than that they were called upon ...
— Colonel Thorndyke's Secret • G. A. Henty

... says he, speaking of the Regicide, "they can obtain a practicable constitution, even for a limited period of time, they will be in a condition to reestablish the accustomed relations of peace and amity." Pray let us leave this bush-fighting. What is meant by a limited period of time? Does it mean the direct contrary to the terms, an unlimited period? If it is a limited period, what limitation does he fix as a ground for his opinion? Otherwise, his limitation is unlimited. If he only requires ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VI. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... model was historical—a representation of Father Hennepin discovering St. Anthonys Falls. The father, in his priestly garb, was shown in the act of stepping from an Indian canoe to the shore. An Indian was holding the canoe to the bank by grasping a small bush, while the boat was steadied by a French voyageur with his paddle. The three types—the aborigine, the priest, and the French voyageur—were accurately reproduced in costume, expression, and features, and were practically life-size. The swift-flowing ...
— Final Report of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission • Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission

... Day fair I searched to find a snail That might my secret lover's name reveal. Upon a gooseberry-bush a snail I found, For always snails near sweetest fruit abound. I seized the vermin, home I quickly sped, And on the hearth the milk-white embers spread: Slow crawled the snail, and, if I right can spell, In the soft ashes marked a curious L. Oh, may this wondrous omen lucky prove! ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... of the bitter wood-smoke, And sick of the wind and rain: I will leave the bush behind me, And look for ...
— The La Chance Mine Mystery • Susan Carleton Jones

... The rose-bush, planted with such tearful care, Stands in the winter sunshine stiff and bare; Save here and there its lingering berries red Make the cold sunbeams warm ...
— Purgatory • Mary Anne Madden Sadlier

... Here, all the clouds of sunset stood, caught up in burning gold. Even as I paused, dazzled a moment by the sudden radiance, from height to height the wild bright rose of evening ran. Not a tottering stone, black, well-nigh shapeless with age, not a green bush, but seemed to dwell unconsumed in its own fire above this desolate ground. The trees that grew around me—willow and yew, thorn and poplar—were but flaming cages for the wild birds that perched in ...
— Henry Brocken - His Travels and Adventures in the Rich, Strange, Scarce-Imaginable Regions of Romance • Walter J. de la Mare

... There are instances of the expression angel which refer to a momentary, special creation of a light or air for the special benefit of the people. This explains a number of theophanies in the Bible, such as the burning bush, "the glory of the Lord," the cloud in the wilderness, and ...
— A History of Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy • Isaac Husik

... stay—stay here for ever!" she exclaimed, leaning back against the bush under which they sat. "Here, amidst the whispering of the winds and the dash of the waters, you would listen no more for the roll of the drum, or the booming of cannon at Saint Marc. I am weary ...
— The Hour and the Man - An Historical Romance • Harriet Martineau

... he did find a spot to lie down on, and, with a sigh of relief, lay back to indulge in repose. Alas! the spot was a myth—he merely dreamed it; the next moment he dropt, like a huge over-ripe pear, to the ground. Fortunately a bush broke the violence of his fall, and, springing up with a cry of consternation, he rushed towards the tree, expecting each instant to feel the terrible hug of his ursine enemy. The very marrow in his back-bone ...
— The Golden Dream - Adventures in the Far West • R.M. Ballantyne

... a genuine house-ivy for sentiment! She has only to apply at my former hotel, La Clef de Surete. And gay as a hunchback who's just drowned his wife! Gautruche, called Gogo-la-Gaiete, egad! A pretty fellow who knows what's what, who doesn't beat about the bush, a good old body who takes things easy and who won't give himself the colic with that fishes' grog!" With that he took a bottle of water that stood beside him and hurled it twenty yards away. "Long live the walls! They're ...
— Germinie Lacerteux • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt

... he finished his task. The clean, sweet air and the exercise had given him an appetite to which the smell of cooking bacon and hot coffee that proceeded from the house had set a sharper edge. He took his coat from a bush and put it on. Mrs. Waters appeared ...
— Captains All and Others • W.W. Jacobs

... 27th.—At supper last night, a houseboat fisherman, going by in his skiff, parted the willows fringing our beach, and offered to sell us some of his wares. We bought from him a two-pound catfish, which he tethered to a bush overhanging the water, until we were ready to dress it; giving us warning, that meanwhile it would be best to have an eye on our purchase, or the turtles would devour it. Hungry thieves, these turtles, the fisherman said; you could leave nothing edible in water or on land, unprotected, without ...
— Afloat on the Ohio - An Historical Pilgrimage of a Thousand Miles in a Skiff, from Redstone to Cairo • Reuben Gold Thwaites

... was dispirited and critical, and as it had not yet learned to control its mood, it marched as a dispirited and critical person would be apt to march in the brazen middle of a July day. Every spring and rivulet, every blackberry bush and apple tree upon the road gathered recruits. The halts for no purpose were interminable, the perpetual Close up, close up, men! of the exasperated officers as unavailing as the droning in the heat of the burnished June-bugs. The brigade had no intention ...
— The Long Roll • Mary Johnston

... beasts, the soft and patient lamb. Of all fowls, the mild and gall-less dove. Christ is the rose of the field, and the lily of the valley. When God appeared to Moses, it was not in the lofty cedar, nor the sturdy oak, nor the spreading plane; but in a bush, an humble, slender, abject shrub: as if he would, by these elections, check the conceited arrogance of man. Nothing procureth love like humility; nothing hate, like pride. The proud man walks among ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 20, - Issue 572, October 20, 1832 • Various

... Dr. Bush used to say in his valedictory address to the students of the medical college, "Young gentlemen, you have two pockets: a large pocket and a small pocket. The large pocket is for your annoyances and your insults, the small ...
— T. De Witt Talmage - As I Knew Him • T. De Witt Talmage

... across the plains. In the hot months intermittent fevers are prevalent in the Guadiana valley. The rainfall is scanty in average years, and only an insignificant proportion of the land is irrigated, while the rest is devoted to pasture, or covered with thin bush and forest. Agriculture, and the cultivation of fruit, including the vine and olive, are thus in a very backward condition; but Badajoz possesses more livestock than any other Spanish province. Its acorn-fed swine are celebrated throughout Spain for their ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 2 - "Baconthorpe" to "Bankruptcy" • Various

... when we hurried home from the old bush school how we were sometimes startled by a bearded apparition, who smiled kindly down on us, and whom our mother introduced, as we raked off our hats, as "An old mate of your father's on the diggings, Johnny." And he would pat our heads and say we were ...
— While the Billy Boils • Henry Lawson

... getting into a wood. Of what consequence was it whether his horse was known or not? for how could that help his pursuer to catch him, if, like a maroon negro, having run away safely into the impenetrable thicket, he staid in the bush for the remainder of his days,—or as long as he was not wanted for a breakfast by a hungry wild beast? The author means us to understand, after the fugitive had baffled pursuit by getting into the depth of the forest, that he lay hidden there for a certain number ...
— Tacitus and Bracciolini - The Annals Forged in the XVth Century • John Wilson Ross

... are more distinct on the trees. I saw one year in a neighboring town some trees fuller of fruit than I remember to have ever seen before, small yellow apples hanging over the road. The branches were gracefully drooping with their weight, like a barberry-bush, so that the whole tree acquired a new character. Even the topmost branches, instead of standing erect, spread and drooped in all directions; and there were so many poles supporting the lower ones, that they looked like ...
— Wild Apples • Henry David Thoreau

... some times the elder ones, who set out on this woodland excursion had no fixed destination, ... when they were tired of going on the ordinary road, they turned into the bush, and wherever they saw an inhabited spot ... they went into it with all the ease of intimacy.... The good people, not in the least surprised at this intrusion, very calmly opened the reserved apartments.... After sharing ...
— Woman's Life in Colonial Days • Carl Holliday

... afternoon when I reached the spot. The beaters were all ready and impatient, no doubt, owing to being kept waiting so long, and as I did not wish to delay them, and had no ladder, and there was no suitable tree, I took a seat on the ground behind a bush which lay on one side of, and about twenty yards from, a depression in the land through the bottom of which, by all the laws of tigers, the tiger ought to have passed to the main forest beyond. I had no sooner seated myself than ...
— Gold, Sport, And Coffee Planting In Mysore • Robert H. Elliot

... for some time previously. These little boys shot Baxter and robbed the camp of nearly all the food and ammunition it contained, and then, while Eyre was running up from the horses to where Baxter lay, decamped into the bush and were only seen the following morning, but never afterwards. One other and older boy, a native of Albany, whither Eyre was bound, now alone remained. Eyre and this boy (Wylie) now pushed on in a starving condition, living upon dead fish ...
— Australia Twice Traversed, The Romance of Exploration • Ernest Giles

... me an' McGinty, I sidles up to Pinky an' sorter gives her to understand that she wouldn't have to clap me in irons to fondle them red whiskers o' mine. She sticks a flower in them, Mac, s'help me, and then giggles foolish an' ducks into the bush. ...
— Captain Scraggs - or, The Green-Pea Pirates • Peter B. Kyne

... feeling it. At the grumbling Corder turned to me a face of relief. "Thank Heaven!" he said piously. "I thought I was growing old." Our route was through the edge of Plattsburg, along some miles of highway, and then by gravel roads to this camp near Ryan's Grove, which is a fine sugar bush on the hillside below us. After only eight miles of road, there were very few of us that were not ...
— At Plattsburg • Allen French

... one rainy season, I put up for the night at a small, weather-bound inn, perched half way up a mountain range, where several Bush servants on the tramp had also taken refuge from the down-pouring torrents. I had had a long and fatiguing ride over a very bad country, so, after supper, retired into the furthest corner of the one room, that served for "kitchen, and parlor, and ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 2, July, 1850. • Various

... hoop along the road Just where the bushes are, when, suddenly, There came a shout,—I ran away and stowed Myself beneath a bush, and watched to see What made the noise, and then, around the bend, I saw a woman running. She was old And wrinkle-faced, and had big teeth.—The end Of her red shawl caught on a bush and rolled Right off her, and her hair fell down.—Her ...
— Georgian Poetry 1916-17 - Edited by Sir Edward Howard Marsh • Various

... plenty of bush and cover, all along the bank, Zaki. We will stay here till the evening, and then move three miles farther down; so that you may be handy, if I have to leave the Dervishes ...
— With Kitchener in the Soudan - A Story of Atbara and Omdurman • G. A. Henty

... those minor ones cited by Grimm and Simrock, are: Haulemutter, Mutter Holle, the Klagemutter or Klagemuhmen, Pudelmutter (a name applied to the goddess Berchta), Etelmutter, Kornmutter, Roggenmutter, Mutterkorn, and the interesting Buschgroszmutter, "bush grandmother," as the "Queen of the Wood-Folk" is called. Here the mother-feeling has been so strong as to grant to even the devil a mother and a grandmother, who figure in many proverbs and folk-locutions. When the question is asked a Mecklenburger, concerning ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... hemp plant, which provides hallucinogens with some sedative properties, and includes marijuana (pot, Acapulco gold, grass, reefer), tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol), hashish (hash), and hashish oil (hash oil). Coca (mostly Erythroxylum coca) is a bush with leaves that contain the stimulant used to make cocaine. Coca is not to be confused with cocoa, which comes from cacao seeds and is used in making chocolate, cocoa, and cocoa butter. Cocaine is a stimulant ...
— The 2005 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... to crush down his mowing grass, he drove him into the meadow. The high grass softly turned about the wheels and the horse's legs, leaving its seeds clinging to the wet axles and spokes of the wheels. His brother seated himself under a bush, arranging his tackle, while Levin led the horse away, fastened him up, and walked into the vast gray-green sea of grass unstirred by the wind. The silky grass with its ripe seeds came almost to his ...
— Anna Karenina • Leo Tolstoy

... sported a long, twirling mustache, that almost enveloped his mouth. The sailors said he looked like a rat with his teeth through a bunch of oakum, or a St. Jago monkey peeping through a prickly-pear bush. ...
— White Jacket - or, the World on a Man-of-War • Herman Melville

... distance when a granite roller lying on the ploughed slope beneath a clump of bushes invited him to rest. Mr. Fogo accepted the invitation, and seated himself to contemplate the scene. The bush at his back was comfortable, and by degrees the bright intoxication of his senses settled to a drowsy content. He pulled out his pipe and lit it. Through the curls of blue smoke he watched the glitter on the water below, the prismatic dazzle ...
— The Astonishing History of Troy Town • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... at me. And I, too, looked at him. We were thinking of the same thing—old Cazalette's find on the bush in the scrub near the beach at Ravensdene Court. And I could not repress ...
— Ravensdene Court • J. S. (Joseph Smith) Fletcher

... know little about bush-fighting or soldiering of any kind. Now then, the women into ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 54, No. 334, August 1843 • Various

... o'clock the trenches had been reduced to a decent order, and the men were able to eat their breakfasts. At noon the Oxfords, who had been moving away to the right, took over from 81-97; B Company carried on the line to a large bush near 28, which had escaped the bombardment, and from there C Company extended to the Bucks' right flank. This sorting out had scarcely been accomplished when the enemy started a heavy bombardment, which lasted ...
— The War Service of the 1/4 Royal Berkshire Regiment (T. F.) • Charles Robert Mowbray Fraser Cruttwell



Words linked to "Bush" :   supply, Geoffroea decorticans, caragana, heath, bearberry, hydrangea, Brassaia actinophylla, Canella winterana, Chinese angelica, Jew bush, Dovyalis caffra, bushing, corkwood, Chilean nut, Lavatera arborea, Francoa ramosa, lavender cotton, Acocanthera venenata, cinquefoil, bush-league, grevillea, Leucothoe racemosa, Brunfelsia americana, box, Flacourtia indica, casava, crepe gardenia, woody plant, honeysuckle, cranberry bush, dahl, furnish, Jacquinia keyensis, Jerusalem thorn, Lindera benzoin, coralberry, Cestrum nocturnum, guinea flower, crotch hair, chaparral pea, Bauhinia monandra, Chilean hazelnut, blueberry, Chilean flameflower, gorse, Loiseleuria procumbens, common flat pea, desert rose, allspice, European cranberry bush, lilac, butterfly flower, ligneous plant, Lagerstroemia indica, castor bean plant, Ledum groenlandicum, Grewia asiatica, bush out, quince bush, coca, kidney wort, Chamaecytisus palmensis, Hakea laurina, juneberry, Ilex cornuta, Codariocalyx motorius, bush tit, crepe myrtle, geebung, dombeya, Larrea tridentata, German tamarisk, Ardisia escallonoides, lomatia, Euonymus atropurpureus, gooseberry, Mahernia verticillata, crape jasmine, Brazilian potato tree, coronilla, gardenia, furze, Lepidothamnus fonkii, Halimodendron halodendron, Erythroxylon truxiuense, Acocanthera oppositifolia, Jacquinia armillaris, East Indian rosebay, Cyrilla racemiflora, bracelet wood, Lycium carolinianum, Hermannia verticillata, huckleberry oak, kalmia, Conradina glabra, bush poppy, Aspalathus linearis, Hibiscus farragei, buckler mustard, capsicum, coyote brush, cotton plant, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, indigo, Labrador tea, honey bell, Chrysolepis sempervirens, Chilean rimu, rabbit bush, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, bush baby, crystal tea, Cytesis proliferus, Caesalpinia decapetala, feijoa, Georgia bark, lily-of-the-valley tree, devil's walking stick, Japanese andromeda, five-finger, boxthorn, Japan allspice, Ardisia paniculata, batoko palm, bristly locust, climbing hydrangea, Gaultheria shallon, jasmine, Mahonia nervosa, Hazardia cana, joint fir, hiccough nut, marmalade bush, catclaw, kali, groundberry, impala lily, Genista raetam, Datura suaveolens, bush violet, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, laurel sumac, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Chile hazel, Biscutalla laevigata, groundsel tree, consumption weed, fetterbush, carissa, day jessamine, croton, Clethra alnifolia, Aristotelia racemosa, helianthemum, bush pea, crepe jasmine, beat around the bush, Leucothoe editorum, Datura sanguinea, George Bush, banksia, bridal-wreath, Cordyline terminalis, Lyonia ligustrina, mallow, Baccharis viminea, Graptophyllum pictum, jujube, indigo plant, Datura arborea, he-huckleberry, glory pea, false tamarisk, cotton-seed tree, Epigaea repens, butcher's broom, hamelia, Lyonia mariana, bush shrike, crepe flower, crape myrtle, cranberry, poison bush, camelia, governor plum, Brugmansia arborea, chaparral broom, bush vetch, Acocanthera oblongifolia, elder, provide, horsebean, coffee rose, cranberry heath, squaw-bush, Lysiloma sabicu, Indian currant, cyrilla, Diervilla lonicera, camellia, Cercis occidentalis, Griselinia lucida, Fabiana imbricata, dusty miller, California redbud, Desmodium motorium, alpine azalea, haw, coca plant, catjang pea, desert willow, Euonymus americanus, Dalea spinosa, Baccharis pilularis, Japanese allspice, buddleia, leucothoe, kei apple, Camellia sinensis, Comptonia asplenifolia, male berry, cotton, smoke bush, Halimodendron argenteum, bladder senna, columnea, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, Dalmatian laburnum, hovea, holly-leaves barberry, cajan pea, cupflower, cranberry tree, Brugmansia sanguinea, fetter bush, Ledum palustre, bitter pea, spicebush, Leitneria floridana, laurel cherry, fool's huckleberry, Anthyllis barba-jovis, arbutus, Lambertia formosa, Christmasberry, Leucothoe fontanesiana, Hakea leucoptera, Christ's-thorn, bridal wreath, makomako, bean caper, bush hibiscus, pepper bush, Guevina heterophylla, blackthorn, bush honeysuckle, lentisk, Kochia scoparia, cotoneaster, crowberry, beauty bush, jujube bush, maikoa, Anadenanthera colubrina, Leycesteria formosa, Colutea arborescens, firethorn, lady-of-the-night, California beauty, Christmas berry, crampbark, greasewood, gastrolobium, Kiggelaria africana, guelder rose, Eriodictyon californicum, Acocanthera spectabilis, Guevina avellana, hollygrape, flowering quince, blolly, hawthorn, hiccup nut, amorpha, Eryngium maritimum, barberry, Kolkwitzia amabilis, Indian rhododendron, Catha edulis, leatherwood, cherry laurel, ephedra, Ardisia crenata, chanal, flame pea, Chiococca alba, stingaree-bush, leatherleaf, boxwood, barilla, Australian heath, bush jacket, pubic hair, cassava, Adenium multiflorum, daphne, forestiera, Diervilla sessilifolia, honey-flower, Griselinia littoralis, lotus tree, chanar, calliandra, guinea gold vine, Apalachicola rosemary, shrub, Anagyris foetida, Hakea lissosperma, Combretum bracteosum, black greasewood, Caesalpinia sepiaria, caper, flowering hazel, huckleberry, eggplant bush, Cestrum diurnum, currant, highbush cranberry, frangipanni, Chile nut, hemp, Caulophyllum thalictroides, bramble bush, daisy bush, Aralia spinosa, glasswort, chalice vine, clianthus, bryanthus, capsicum pepper plant, flame bush, dwarf golden chinkapin, blueberry root, rosebush, American angelica tree, forsythia, belvedere, kudu lily, quail bush, Aralia elata, Embothrium coccineum, African hemp, Dacridium laxifolius, fuchsia, Lupinus arboreus, Adenium obesum, Bassia scoparia, broom, corkwood tree, hediondilla, Desmodium gyrans, Mahonia aquifolium, ground-berry, President George W. Bush, render, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, Lepechinia calycina, fothergilla, Dirca palustris, Brugmansia suaveolens, honeyflower, derris, Acalypha virginica, Himalaya honeysuckle, Aristotelia serrata, cushion flower, dog hobble, maleberry, Chinese angelica tree, Canella-alba, dhal, flowering shrub, Baccharis halimifolia, Japanese angelica tree, Codiaeum variegatum, honeybells, Croton tiglium, frangipani, andromeda, Madagascar plum, scrub, arrow wood, Astroloma humifusum, coville, joewood, candlewood, barbasco, fringe bush



Copyright © 2022 Dictionary One.com