Online dictionaryOnline dictionary
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Bear   /bɛr/   Listen
Bear

verb
(past bore, formerly bare; past part. borne, born; pres. part. bearing)
1.
Have.  "Bear a signature"
2.
Cause to be born.  Synonyms: birth, deliver, give birth, have.
3.
Put up with something or somebody unpleasant.  Synonyms: abide, brook, digest, endure, put up, stand, stick out, stomach, suffer, support, tolerate.  "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks" , "He learned to tolerate the heat" , "She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage"
4.
Move while holding up or supporting.  "Bear a heavy load" , "Bear news" , "Bearing orders"
5.
Bring forth,.  Synonym: turn out.  "The unidentified plant bore gorgeous flowers"
6.
Take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person.  Synonyms: accept, assume, take over.  "She agreed to bear the responsibility"
7.
Contain or hold; have within.  Synonyms: carry, contain, hold.  "The canteen holds fresh water" , "This can contains water"
8.
Bring in.  Synonyms: pay, yield.  "How much does this savings certificate pay annually?"
9.
Have on one's person.  Synonym: wear.  "Bear a scar"
10.
Behave in a certain manner.  Synonyms: acquit, behave, carry, comport, conduct, deport.  "He bore himself with dignity" , "They conducted themselves well during these difficult times"
11.
Have rightfully; of rights, titles, and offices.  Synonym: hold.  "He held the governorship for almost a decade"
12.
Support or hold in a certain manner.  Synonyms: carry, hold.  "He carried himself upright"
13.
Be pregnant with.  Synonyms: carry, expect, gestate, have a bun in the oven.  "The are expecting another child in January" , "I am carrying his child"



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |
Add this dictionary
to your browser search bar





"Bear" Quotes from Famous Books



... of fathers! you would if possible spare me every trial, bear all my burdens. But perhaps the dear child may suffer less in hearing the sad news from her mother's lips, as, in her place, I could bear it better from yours than from ...
— Grandmother Elsie • Martha Finley

... two lines, with the regular naval vessels in the rear, and the gunboats and bomb-vessels in front. As the vessels in the van were to bear the brunt of the battle, they were manned by picked crews from the larger vessels, and had for their officers the most daring spirits of the Mediterranean squadron. At half-past two the firing commenced, and soon from every vessel in the American ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 1 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... God bless you, and make you one of His own children, through Jesus Christ. My heart warms to you for your own sake, and for the sake of her whose name you bear. Farewell.—Your ...
— The Lifeboat • R.M. Ballantyne

... and no mother's son was imbued in the fount of mercy like his, who was "the brightness of his glory and the express image of his perfections." True, her yearnings over the babe of her bosom are great; still they bear but little comparison to him who breathed those feelings there. God compares himself to the mother. "Can a woman forget her sucking child"? Woman, being of a more delicate formation than man, possesses a mind susceptible of more fine, deep, ...
— Twenty-Four Short Sermons On The Doctrine Of Universal Salvation • John Bovee Dods

... biscuit beneath my knuckles; and this mark of mine he will carry with him to his grave." Cellini adds—"These words begat in me such hatred of the man since I was always gazing at the masterpieces of the divine Michael Angelo, that, although I felt a wish to go with him to England, I now could never bear the sight ...
— Michael Angelo Buonarroti • Charles Holroyd

... soothe the father, but I can no longer soothe Oliver. That is my saddest thought. It makes me wish, sometimes, that he would find another loving heart on which he could lean without any self-reproach. I should soon learn to bear it. It would so assure his future and rid me of the fear that he may fail to hold the place he has won by such hard ...
— Dark Hollow • Anna Katharine Green

... going for her mother, and she could bear anything, even that. She did not hold back long. They ran past the canning factory, and Eric did not give a glance to it. A little girl looking out over a pile of cans saw him, however, and wondered at his warm suit of brown cloth, his leggins, sandals and the cap with wings. She remembered him ...
— The Little House in the Fairy Wood • Ethel Cook Eliot

... under them. And the stillness and the height—the stillness and the height! I can't make it real to you as he made it to me! I can't! I was there. He took me. And it was so high—and so still—and so beautiful that I could scarcely bear it." ...
— The Lost Prince • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... stood up and began to cry. I had had enough of misery, and that was more than I could bear. Between my sobs I saw—I did not observe, I just saw—that the lugger was drifting slowly northward, clear of Little Stone Point, as the smugglers had called it. I didn't much care where we drifted, but having ...
— Jim Davis • John Masefield

... ascensor, lift, hoist asegurar, to insure, to secure asentar, to seat, to book (orders) asistir, to assist, to attend asociacion de obreros, trade union asunto, subject, matter, question, affair atajo, short cut ataner, to bear upon atencion, attention atender a, to attend atendible, plausible atenta (su), (your) favour aterlizado, twill atizador, poker atraer, to attract atraicionar, to betray atrasado, overdue atravesar, to cross atrevido, bold, daring atribucion, attribution atribuir, ...
— Pitman's Commercial Spanish Grammar (2nd ed.) • C. A. Toledano

... also upon other points. This is what I wish to avoid, without giving offence. I do not think that the Intendant is so much to blame in having obtained my property, as he does not know that a Beverley existed, but I cannot bear to have any further intimacy with him, especially after what has taken place between me and his daughter. What I have to request is, that you will never quit this room while I am still here, unless you are relieved by Oswald; so that the Intendant ...
— The Children of the New Forest • Captain Marryat

... would help him to make up his mind quickly. He said I was at liberty to do that, so I went out and burned wires over all of South Africa. As he reads all the telegrams he naturally read mine and the next morning he was as humble and white as a head waiter. But by ten o'clock my wires began to bear fruit and he began to catch it. Milner wired him to send us on at once and apologized to us by another wire so all is well and we go vouched ...
— Adventures and Letters • Richard Harding Davis

... The "Bear" walk, or walking about the room on all fours without bending the knees, is one of the best exercises for a torpid liver that can be imagined, but it should be practised in private, or your ...
— The Royal Road to Health • Chas. A. Tyrrell

... are made of some kind of weed strongly bound together in bundles. The roofs are very thick, and so are the walls; the latter have square holes in them for windows. At a little distance these cabins have a furry appearance, as if they might be made of bear skins. They are very cool and pleasant inside. The King's flag was flying from the roof of one of the cottages, and His Majesty was probably within. He owns the whole concern thereabouts, and passes his time there frequently, on sultry days ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... gallant and so courteous, how is it that when women rule their reign is always stormy and troublous? Anne of Austria—comely, amiable, and gracious as she was—met with the same brutal discourtesy which her sister-in-law, Marie de Medici, had been obliged to bear. But gifted with greater force of intellect than that queen, she never yielded aught of her just rights; and it was her strong will which more than once astounded her enemies and saved the crown ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... shalt thou eat," was followed by a sudden metamorphosis, and that till then the appearance of the serpent was as lovely as it is now loathsome. They gave the words of the curse a literal interpretation. They bear a deeper meaning, no doubt; yet the fancy of these old divines may have approached nearer to fact than many perhaps suppose. Science reads the history of remote ages as she finds it inscribed on the rocks; and, on turning over these stony leaves, we find that the earliest form of ...
— The Angels' Song • Thomas Guthrie

... an author, or an editor, or somebody of importance in the literary world, and I need these four years at college. Besides, it's a good thing to bear the college stamp if one expects always to be before the public," was the ...
— Grace Harlowe's Third Year at Overton College • Jessie Graham Flower

... she could have seen her, and tried her own powers; but, almost before she could hint the wish, Miss Bates made it appear that she had promised her niece on no account to let Miss Woodhouse in. "Indeed, the truth was, that poor dear Jane could not bear to see any body—any body at all—Mrs. Elton, indeed, could not be denied—and Mrs. Cole had made such a point—and Mrs. Perry had said so much—but, except them, Jane ...
— Persuasion • Jane Austen

... credit and debit, or has his labor and pleasure parcelled out to him by the community,—the law which we have just disengaged will always be fulfilled. Our interest accounts do nothing else than bear witness ...
— The Philosophy of Misery • Joseph-Pierre Proudhon

... strength to be brought to bear in dealing with a selected physical objective, the tactical concern of the moment, and that necessary to the attainment of the strategical aim (see pages 9 and 10), constitutes a fundamental consideration ...
— Sound Military Decision • U.s. Naval War College

... had on him, raging in imprecations, and calling to me that if I had thrown the gold overboard (always the gold with him!) I might have saved the child. "And now," says he, in a terrible voice, "we shall founder, and all go to the Devil, for our sins will sink us, when we have no innocent child to bear us up!" We so discovered with amazement, that this old wretch had only cared for the life of the pretty little creature dear to all of us, because of the influence he superstitiously hoped she might have ...
— The Wreck of the Golden Mary • Charles Dickens

... sick-room. The brothers and nephews of the prince, who had come to Berlin in order to see their dying relative once more, had vainly solicited this favor. The physicians had told them that the suffering prince was unable to bear any excitement, there being great danger that immediate death would be the consequence of a scene ...
— LOUISA OF PRUSSIA AND HER TIMES • Louise Muhlbach

... obviously the truth that to make it strong she must, avoiding every side-issue, keep it very simple, "The only account I can give you, I think, is that I could but speak at such a moment as I felt, and that I felt—well, how can I say how deeply? If you can really bear to know, I feel so still I care in fact more than ever that we shouldn't do such things. I care, if you like, to indiscretion—I care, if you like, to offence, to arrogance, to folly. But even as my last word to you before ...
— The Outcry • Henry James

... who had been brought up a Roman Catholic. Leland passes over this work with a slight notice; but it marked a distinct epoch in Deistical literature. For the first time, the secular arm was brought to bear upon a writer of this school. The book was presented by the Grand Jury of Middlesex, and was burnt by the hands of the hangman in Dublin by order of the Irish House of Commons. It was subsequently condemned as heretical and impious by the Lower House of Convocation, which body ...
— The English Church in the Eighteenth Century • Charles J. Abbey and John H. Overton

... resolved into a habit, in another it must be accounted a disease. What is wanted in the one case, therefore, is some method of removing the man out of the sphere of the temptation, and in the other for treating the passion as a disease, as we should any other physical affection, bringing to bear upon it every agency, hygienic and otherwise, calculated to ...
— "In Darkest England and The Way Out" • General William Booth

... ready to be amused at anything. In view of the royal guests the Manager had provided several exciting novelties. There was a wonderful troupe of performing horses who did everything that a horse is popularly supposed to be incapable of doing; there was a gypsy girl from Seville with a marvellous bear, whose intelligence appeared to be of a superior quality to that of the average human being; there were new jokes, new ...
— The Hippodrome • Rachel Hayward

... Ferdinand,' she burst upon the conversation, 'Drummond is afraid to—he can stand by and see my friend insulted. Ferdinand is insufferable with his pride—he's jealous of everybody who has manners, and Drummond approves him, and I will not bear it.' ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... his Doctor, the poet laureate did not claim to do more than repeat a popular tale. I think that there can be little doubt that in Mrs. H.'s version we have now recovered this in its original form. If this is so, we may here have one more incident of the great Northern beast epic of bear and fox, on which Prof. Krohn has written an instructive monograph, Baer (Wolf.) und Fuchs ...
— More English Fairy Tales • Various

... an hour of the presentation of my letter, and they brought with them an invitation from Mrs. Allen for us to join them at Christmas dinner the next day, as Mrs. White said they could not bear to think of ...
— As Seen By Me • Lilian Bell

... the heat is, unless you have some proof of it; but you will soon see that I have actually the power of melting platinum. Here is a piece of platinum-foil running like wax under the flame which I am bringing to bear against it. The question, however, is whether we shall get heat enough to melt, not this small quantity, but large masses—many pounds of the metal. Having obtained heat like this, the next consideration is what vessel is he to employ which could retain the platinum when so ...
— The Chemical History Of A Candle • Michael Faraday

... years—strayed down to these mountains upon her sorrowful way home to her native place. She had her only child with her, a boy five years of age; and from some reason or other, perhaps because she could not bear to go home in shame and disgrace, she sought out a very lonely hiding-place among the hills, and with her own hands reared rough walls of turf and stones, until she had formed such a rude hut as would just give shelter to her and ...
— Fern's Hollow • Hesba Stretton

... than debtors; and in another place says, Creditors are a superstitious set, great observers of set days and times. The day comes round before you are aware, and the demand is made before you are prepared to satisfy it; or, if you will bear your debt in mind, the term which at first seemed so long will, as it lessens, appear extremely short. Time will seem to have added wings to his heels as well as his shoulders. Those have a short Lent, saith Poor Richard, ...
— One Thousand Secrets of Wise and Rich Men Revealed • C. A. Bogardus

... designs. These are massed together with very little order, the main object having been apparently to cover the whole surface of the stone with ornament. The designs consist of spirals, concentric circles and semicircles, chevrons, rows of strokes, and triangles, and bear a considerable resemblance to those of Lough Crew and New ...
— Rough Stone Monuments and Their Builders • T. Eric Peet

... branches and mingled on the same branch, berries of the red, white, and champagne kinds. (11/11. 'Gardener's Chronicle' 1842 page 873; 1855 page 646. In the 'Chronicle' page 876 Mr. P. Mackenzie states that the bush still continues to bear the three kinds of fruit, "although they have not been every year alike.) The suspicion naturally arises that this variety may have originated from a cross between a red and white variety, and that the above transformation may be accounted for by reversion to both parent-forms; but from the ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication - Volume I • Charles Darwin

... Arr'thorne Park,' the man replied. 'But you won't come anigh the Lodge, unless you bear round to ...
— The Hand of Ethelberta • Thomas Hardy

... day or night," said the captain. "I don't know who or what he is, but he is a man; and I could not bear him ...
— A Simpleton • Charles Reade

... year, considered as a season, resemble the old age of life considered as a season. To what peculiarities, pray, in the character and conduct of aged gentlemen in general, do rain, sleet, hail, frost, ice, snow, winds, blasts, storms, hurricanes, and occasional thunder and lightning, bear analogy? We pause for a reply. Old men's heads, it is true, are frequently white, though more frequently bald, and their blood is not so hot as when they were springalds. But though there be no great harm in likening a sprinkling of white hair on mine ancient's temples to the appearance ...
— Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2 • John Wilson

... essays in general it may be said that they bear witness alike to the diversity of his knowledge and the penetrative power of his intellect. The wide range of his subjects, however, deprives his papers when taken together of the weight which might attach to a series of related discussions. ...
— The English Mail-Coach and Joan of Arc • Thomas de Quincey

... written plainly on her round red face. A great white Jam Pot danced just behind the Cook, and was followed by a dozen bright Green Apples. A Dancing-master came next, bowing and smiling at Peter as he passed him, then a Bear paddling clumsily along on its hind legs, its great red mouth wide open to show its long white teeth, then a Gooseberry Tart marked "Stolen", then an Arithmetic with a mean sort of face, rulers for legs, and compasses for arms; ...
— The Wonderful Bed • Gertrude Knevels

... will bear me out in this, I think. Your husband has genius—that is beyond question—but he is unknown here as yet. Would it not be a pity for him to be introduced to the American public through these rather sinister ...
— The Nest Builder • Beatrice Forbes-Robertson Hale

... inspired prophets he had meditated—and while he was musing the fire burned. The only title he wrote over it was "Prosa de mortuis," Prosa (or prosa oratio)—from prorsus, "straight forward"—appears here in the truly conventional sense it was beginning to bear, but not yet as the antipode of "poetry." The modest author, unconscious of the magnitude of his work, called it simply "Plain speech concerning ...
— The Story of the Hymns and Tunes • Theron Brown and Hezekiah Butterworth

... of this theory much of the mystery which surrounds the fate of Joan of Arc is explained. She was put to death as a witch, and the conduct of her associates during her military career, as well as the evidence at her trial, bear out the fact that she belonged to the ancient religion, not to the Christian. Nine years after her death in the flames her commander, Gilles de Rais, was tried on the same charge and condemned to the same fate. The sentence was not carried out completely in his case; ...
— The Witch-cult in Western Europe - A Study in Anthropology • Margaret Alice Murray

... and my Indians gathered around like fiercely-whining hounds. It was starlight, but too dark to see, except what was shadowed against the river; so we all lay flat, waiting, listening for whatever it was, deer or bear or man. ...
— The Hidden Children • Robert W. Chambers

... 's right. You always was such a muddlehead that you couldn't tell good from bad, and you don't know any better now. Poor old Nat, I don't bear you any malice or hatred in my heart. I'm sorry ...
— Crown and Sceptre - A West Country Story • George Manville Fenn

... but as in being. First, because such conversion is not successive, as was said above (Q. 75, A. 7), but instantaneous; and in such changes the becoming is nothing else than the being. Secondly, because the sacramental forms bear the same relation to the signification of the sacramental effect as artificial forms to the representation of the effect of art. Now an artificial form is the likeness of the ultimate effect, on which the artist's ...
— Summa Theologica, Part III (Tertia Pars) - From the Complete American Edition • Thomas Aquinas

... the King's guarantee of a loan, which Dr Franklin endeavored to negotiate last year at Genoa. He is said to have been obstinately attached to his own opinions, and of a haughtiness in supporting them, which the man who placed him could ill brook. He felt an opposition that he could not bear, and which, perhaps, he saw he must sink under, and, therefore, asked his dismission, which was granted him. He is regretted as a public loss. It would be presumption in me, to enter into a more minute detail on this subject, as your correspondents ...
— The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. IX • Various

... At Henry's death in 1135, Matilda's infant heir was still very young at Le Mans, and the usual anarchy followed both in England and in Normandy that was inevitable when the direct male line of Norman Dukes died out. Of the two countries Normandy had perhaps the fate that was hardest to bear, for it was better to be ruled by any one than a Count of that Maine, with whom, as with an equal, so many centuries of battles had been fought. But the strong stock of Anjou and Maine soon took advantage of the weakness of the Northern Duchy, ...
— The Story of Rouen • Sir Theodore Andrea Cook

... winter soon came on, and we retired to Valley Forge to suffer and to bear what was far more deadly than the English bullets—the terrible cold and desolation of that dreary place. Cold, bitterly cold it was, as the wind came down from the mountains, swept over the broad fields, pierced through ...
— The Tory Maid • Herbert Baird Stimpson

... took much notice of poor Maddie, but I watched her pretty close, and saw the tears come into her eyes, though she let 'em run down her face before she'd pull out her handkerchief. Then she put up her veil and held up her head with a bit of a toss, and I saw her pride had helped her to bear it. I don't suppose anybody else saw her, and if they did they'd only think she was cryin' for company—as women often do at weddings and all kinds of things. But I knew better. She wouldn't peach, poor thing! Still, I saw that ...
— Robbery Under Arms • Thomas Alexander Browne, AKA Rolf Boldrewood

... situated by the weir on the Brawl side, and round which the Low Town had grown, Orthodoxy could make no way at all. Quiet Miss Myra was put out of court by impetuous Mrs. Simcoe and her female aides-de-camp. Ah, it was a hard burthen for the Doctor's lady to bear, to behold her husband's congregation dwindling away; to give the precedence on the few occasions when they met to a notorious low-churchman's wife who was the daughter of an Irish Peer; to know that there was a party in Clavering, their own ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... brought a copy to show you fellows what we can do. And by taking up our claims right, we keep a deadline from the Bear Paws to the Flying U. Now the Old Man owns Denson's ranch, all south uh here is fairly safe—unless they come in between his south line and the breaks; and there ain't room for more than two or three claims there. Maybe we can get some of the boys to grab what there is, ...
— The Flying U's Last Stand • B. M. Bower

... tale 'bout da tam w'en da lil Bear is bin nuss da 'Gator chilluns. 'E bin mek fine nuss fer true. 'E stan' by dem lilly 'Gator tel dey no ...
— Nights With Uncle Remus - Myths and Legends of the Old Plantation • Joel Chandler Harris

... throw an odium on political connexion, these politicians suppose it a necessary incident to it that you are blindly to follow the opinions of your party, when in direct opposition to your own clear ideas; a degree of servitude that no worthy man could bear the thought of submitting to; and such as, I believe, no connexions (except some court factions) ever could be so senselessly tyrannical as to impose. Men thinking freely will, in particular instances, think differently. But still as the greater part of the measures which ...
— Proportional Representation - A Study in Methods of Election • John H. Humphreys

... other branches of jurisprudence". Seventy years have since elapsed, yet this royal promise of codification is not even in course of fulfilment. On the other hand, Brougham's scheme for establishing local courts in certain parts of the kingdom was destined to bear ample fruit in the next reign. It was described by Eldon as "a most abominable bill," and, being generally opposed by the law lords, was rejected by a small majority, but it was the germ of the county courts, which have since done so much to bring justice within ...
— The Political History of England - Vol XI - From Addington's Administration to the close of William - IV.'s Reign (1801-1837) • George Brodrick

... Prince Ravorelli, that I have long been acquainted with the fact that you bear me no good will. Frankly, you regard me as a man dangerous to your most cherished aspirations, and you know that I heard Giovanni Pavesi sing in days gone by. You have not been manly enough to meet me fairly, up to this instant. I am perfectly ...
— Castle Craneycrow • George Barr McCutcheon

... life? Can monarchs there no proud applauses gain, No living laurel for their people slain? Nor Belgia's plains, so fertile made with gore, Hide heroes' bones nor feast the vultures more? Will Rhine no longer cleanse the crimson stain, Nor Danube bear their bodies to the main, That infant empires here the shock must feel, And these pure streams with foreign carnage swell? But who that chief? his name, his nation say, Whose lifeblood seems his follies to repay; And who the youth, that from the combat lost ...
— The Columbiad • Joel Barlow

... is notorious that women of merit frequently marry second-rate men, and bear them children, thus aiding in the war upon progress. One is often astonished to discover that the wife of some sordid and prosaic manufacturer or banker or professional man is a woman of quick intelligence ...
— In Defense of Women • H. L. Mencken

... right. The bear was advancing with great care, sniffing the snow-covered ground at every step. Once or twice he raised his head, as if preparing to run at the ...
— The Rover Boys In The Mountains • Arthur M. Winfield

... better, screamed over the balusters that all were ready but Mary. Sir Guy was heard playing the 'Harmonious Blacksmith,' and Captain Morville's step was heard, fast and firm. At last, when a long chain was put round her neck, she cried out, 'I have submitted to everything so far; I can bear no more!' jumped up, caught hold of her shawl, and was putting it on, when there was a general outcry that they must exhibit ...
— The Heir of Redclyffe • Charlotte M. Yonge

... bands of yellow (top, double width), blue, and red with the coat of arms superimposed at the center of the flag; similar to the flag of Colombia, which is shorter and does not bear ...
— The 2004 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... weakened the kingdom, it inspired such a desire of invading it to the enemy, that Sweyn, King of Denmark, came in person soon after with a prodigious fleet and army. The English, having once found the method of diverting the storm by an inglorious bargain, could not bear to think of any other way of resistance. A greater sum, 48,000l., was now paid, which the Danes accepted with pleasure, as they could by this means exhaust their enemies and enrich themselves with little danger or trouble. With very short intermissions they still returned, ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VII. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... meaning of the word [Greek: logia] has been much debated. Perhaps the strictest translation of it is that which has been given, 'oracles'—short but weighty and solemn or sacred sayings. I should be sorry to say that the word would not bear the sense assigned to it by Dr. Westcott, who paraphrases it felicitously (from his point of view) by our word 'Gospel' [Endnote 155:1]. It is, however, difficult to help feeling that the natural sense of the word has to be somewhat strained in order to make it cover the whole of our present ...
— The Gospels in the Second Century - An Examination of the Critical Part of a Work - Entitled 'Supernatural Religion' • William Sanday

... a pity that such girlish shoulders should be learning to stoop, and that her eyes had to bear such a constant strain. The light was particularly bad this afternoon. Every curtain was rolled to the top of its big window, but the dull December sky was as gray as a fog. Even the snow on the surrounding housetops looked gray and ...
— Cicely and Other Stories • Annie Fellows Johnston

... they not only made catalogues, but maps of the stars visible in their skies, giving to those of the larger magnitudes the Arabic names they still bear on our celestial globes. They ascertained, as we have seen, the size of the earth by the measurement of a degree on her surface, determined the obliquity of the ecliptic, published corrected tables of the sun ...
— History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science • John William Draper

... speak of it. I can't bear even to hear the word." And then, taking alarm, she said he must be feeling really ill, or such things as wills would never have come into his head. "Tell me the truth, dear. Tell me what you do feel—truly." And she asked him all sorts of questions about his health, begging him to consult ...
— The Devil's Garden • W. B. Maxwell

... deep breath and holds it while she strains vigorously, as if to make her bowels move. All voluntary effort should cease as the contraction wears away, for straining between the contractions can accomplish nothing. Her own inclination to "bear down" will clearly indicate to the patient ...
— The Prospective Mother - A Handbook for Women During Pregnancy • J. Morris Slemons

... good-natured: but then you know she was so clever and knew so many things, and poor Giglio knew nothing, and had no conversation. When they looked at the stars, what did Giglio know of the heavenly bodies? Once, when on a sweet night in a balcony where they were standing, Angelica said, 'There is the Bear.' 'Where?' says Giglio. 'Don't be afraid, Angelica! if a dozen bears come, I will kill them rather than they shall hurt you.' 'Oh, you silly creature!' says she; 'you are very good, but you are not very wise.' When they looked at the ...
— The Rose and the Ring • William Makepeace Thackeray

... than to the expansion of the classroom library. This is, perhaps, not the place to dispute the wisdom of our Board of Education in developing classroom libraries, but it may be proper to put in a plea for confining them to books that bear more particularly on the subjects of instruction. The general collection of books should be outside of the school, because the boy is destined to spend most of his life outside of the school. His education by no means ends ...
— A Librarian's Open Shelf • Arthur E. Bostwick

... Italy to the Romans. They answered it would be an extreme high fortune and bade him effect it if he could. Then Belisarius sent to the Goths and bade them perform what they had offered. And they, for the famine was too hard to bear, agreed and sent ambassadors to take the oath of the great Roman for their indemnity and that he would be King of Italy, and when they had it, to return into Ravenna with the Roman army. Now as to their indemnity Belisarius bound himself, but touching ...
— Ravenna, A Study • Edward Hutton

... right there till morning," exclaimed Thede, "and we'll have to shoot them anyway before we can get out. They are kicking themselves now," he continued with a grin, "because they let us in here without a battle. I wish we understood bear talk so that we could learn what ...
— Boy Scouts in Northern Wilds • Archibald Lee Fletcher

... and so pick it up again; then we turned and made straight for the road. "I don't think, Rube," I said after a while, "that we shall strike the road far off where we left it at Pepita's." "No, I expect not, Seth. We had better bear a little more to the south, for they will most likely make for Pepita's, and day will soon be breaking now." "We'd better not strike the road at all, Rube; likely enough, they will follow it down for a few miles in hopes of picking us up." "I hope they will," Rube ...
— Out on the Pampas - The Young Settlers • G. A. Henty

... sorry to ask you to do it," said Jack, "but it is my only chance; and you can see for yourself that I can't live at home. Our whole family is under suspicion; and if I don't get away while I can, there will be such a pressure brought to bear upon me by and by, that I shall be forced to enter the rebel service ...
— Marcy The Blockade Runner • Harry Castlemon

... the eagle is such that it will bear heavy burdens in its talons for miles until it reaches its nest, where the hungry little ones are eagerly waiting the parent's return. Here, standing on the ledge of rock, the eagle tears the food into morsels, which ...
— Harper's Young People, February 10, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... chap; this is a good deal to me. I've tried for two years to get this, and if it falls through now, I shall find it hard to bear.' ...
— Black Rock • Ralph Connor

... every loathsome stench, Will kindle images of hell You'll strive in vain to quench. Yet on—press on, in all your might, With banners to the field, And mingle in the glorious fight, With Satan for your shield: For marble columns, if you die, May on them bear your name; While papers, tho' they sometimes lie, Will praise you, or will blame. Yet woe! to those who build a house, Or kingdom, not by right,— Who in their feebleness propose Against the Lord to fight. For when the Archangel's trumpet sounds, And all the dead shall ...
— American Scenes, and Christian Slavery - A Recent Tour of Four Thousand Miles in the United States • Ebenezer Davies

... to bear hardships at first. Of course no one can become celebrated all at once. And it is not necessary that every one should be first-rate—either actresses or singers. If you would be so kind as to tell me what ...
— Daniel Deronda • George Eliot

... the immeasurably greater power of the strainingly overloaded Strettsian generators themselves. The ethereal and sub-ethereal writhings and distortions and screamings grew worse and worse; harder and ever harder to bear. ...
— Masters of Space • Edward Elmer Smith

... whose name I bear, was the youngest son of a wealthy Yorkshire Baronet, whose hopes and affections entirely centered in his first-born. What became of the junior scions of the family-tree was to him a matter of secondary consideration. My grandfather, however, had to be provided for in a manner becoming ...
— The Monctons: A Novel, Volume I • Susanna Moodie

... is drooping, and nearly laid. As for wheat, I am pretty sure that he has not sown any. Look, too, at those ravines! Were they mine, they would be standing under timber which even a rook could not top. To think of wasting such quantities of land! Where land wouldn't bear corn, I should dig it up, and plant it with vegetables. What ought to be done is that Khlobuev ought to take a spade into his own hands, and to set his wife and children and servants to do the same; and even if they died of the exertion, they would at least die doing their duty, and not through ...
— Dead Souls • Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

... then with a nod to the boy, he started to follow her in. But Steve paused at the threshold, and when the man stopped and looked back to ascertain the cause of his delay he found that the boy was depositing the bear trap upon the porch floor—found him tugging to free the rusty ...
— Then I'll Come Back to You • Larry Evans

... wrinkled and quivering face, the old eyes weeping and winking, the broken voice. "Ah, sir," said Arthur, with a groan, "you have brought pain enough on me, spare me this. You have wished me to marry Blanche. I marry her. For God's sake, sir, rise! I can't bear it." ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... Garretson, Aspers, Adams Co., Penn., has on his place bearing Stuart and Schley pecans, two of the standard southern varieties. These bear nuts of typical shape but which are only a fraction of the size that these nuts would be if grown in southern Georgia. This clearly shows that some of the standard southern pecans require something which they do not get at Aspers to enable them ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Sixth Annual Meeting. Rochester, New York, September 1 and 2, 1915 • Various

... multitudes were travelling with him; and turning around he said to them, [14:26]If any one comes to me, and hates not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brothers, and sisters, and still more his own life also, he cannot be my disciple. [14:27]And whoever does not bear his cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple. [14:28]For what man of you wishing to build a tower, does not first sit down and estimate the expense, whether he has the means to finish? [14:29]lest ...
— The New Testament • Various

... narcissistic love. Indeed, it must have been a great labor that was expended on the darkening and spicing and sharpening of the style in certain of his orchestral poems; the effort to create a new idiom based on the Gregorian modes, to which "Hora mystica" and the recent work for string quartet bear witness, must in itself have been large. But though in result of all the chasing and hammering on gold, the filing and polishing, the vessel of his art has perhaps become richer and finer, it has not become any fuller. His second period differs from his first only in the fact that in ...
— Musical Portraits - Interpretations of Twenty Modern Composers • Paul Rosenfeld

... were intimate with Shelley at this time, each has given us a different version of this sad event, colored by his own views and personal feelings. Evidently, Shelley confided to none of these friends. We, who bear his name and are of his family, have in our possession papers written by his own hand, which, in after-years, may make the story of his life complete, and which few now living, except Shelley's own ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. XI., February, 1863, No. LXIV. • Various

... trick: The conference was sadly borne.—They have the truth of this from Hero. They seem to pity the lady; it seems her affections have their full bent. Love me! why, it must be requited. I hear how I am censured: they say I will bear myself proudly, if I perceive the love come from her; they say too, that she will rather die than give any sign of affection.—I did never think to marry—I must not seem proud:—Happy are they that ...
— Much Ado About Nothing • William Shakespeare [Knight edition]

... him, sir, what you think?" said I; for I could not bear the idea of allowing the old man to go out of the world ...
— Will Weatherhelm - The Yarn of an Old Sailor • W.H.G. Kingston

... is. I was born in that region, and it pleased me to bear Cevennes as a name of war. I possess a title, but I do not assume it; I simply draw its revenues." The Chevalier scowled at his buckles, as if some disagreeable thought had come ...
— The Grey Cloak • Harold MacGrath

... month of March, at the dying-out of the Eagle Moon, that Neewa the black bear cub got his first real look at the world. Noozak, his mother, was an old bear, and like an old person she was filled with rheumatics and the desire to sleep late. So instead of taking a short and ordinary nap of three months this particular winter of ...
— Nomads of the North - A Story of Romance and Adventure under the Open Stars • James Oliver Curwood

... to the walls of the town, and completely conceal it. The soil is sand, but is fertilized by being constantly refreshed by little channels, from wells of brackish water. The inhabitants, who are of the tribe Fateima, bear a ...
— Lander's Travels - The Travels of Richard Lander into the Interior of Africa • Robert Huish

... quite different from what it was, and if I found consolation, distraction, and forgetfulness in my art, she verily believes I had no need of them. Enough. I have come to this resolution with myself: I can no longer bear this everlasting squabbling and distrustful temper if I have to fulfil my life's task courageously. Whoever has observed me sufficiently must wonder at my patience, kindness, even weakness, and if I am condemned by superficial judges I am quite indifferent to them. But never had Minna such an ...
— The Love Affairs of Great Musicians, Volume 2 • Rupert Hughes

... study of this book is in progress, it is well for the pupils to limit their home reading to such books as bear directly upon the subject. Under this head we have suggested several books which belong to the "storybook" order. Wholesome books of fiction and semifiction may certainly do much to stimulate and hold the attention of young students of American history. ...
— Hero Stories from American History - For Elementary Schools • Albert F. Blaisdell

... hands, the wrinkled and quivering face, the old eyes weeping and winking, the broken voice. "Ah, sir," said Arthur, with a groan. "You have brought pain enough on me, spare me this. You have wished me to marry Blanche. I marry her. For God's sake, sir, rise, I can't bear it." ...
— The History of Pendennis, Vol. 2 - His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy • William Makepeace Thackeray

... sports," he asserted drunkenly, waving his hand insultingly at the crowd. "You're cheap guys—you can't bear ...
— Wunpost • Dane Coolidge

... said indignantly that he could tolerate a somewhat detailed description of the apparel of Marmion, but when it came to an equally detailed account of the apparel of his pages and yeomen the mind could bear it no longer. The only thing to be said about that critic is that he had never been a little boy. He foolishly imagined that Scott valued the plume and dagger of Marmion for Marmion's sake. Not being himself romantic, he could not understand that ...
— Twelve Types • G.K. Chesterton

... Well brought up with a vengeance they are! To please you, I sometimes Went to visit them, just for the sake of olden acquaintance But I was never much pleased at holding intercourse with them, For they were always finding fault, and I had to bear it First my coat was too long, the cloth too coarse, and the colour Far too common, my hair was cut and curl'd very badly. I at last was thinking of dressing myself like the shop-boys, Who are accustom'd on Sundays to show off their persons up yonder, ...
— The Poems of Goethe • Goethe

... your own account," she continued, flinging prudence to the winds, "as your brethren came to Philippa de Luns, to offer me the choice you offered her, I give you her answer! If I had thought of myself only, I had not lived so long! And rather than bear your presence ...
— Count Hannibal - A Romance of the Court of France • Stanley J. Weyman

... not survive their torture long. Men of all ages and conditions, accustomed to indoor life, could not bear the exposure to the sun, rain, and snow, which the punishment of the galley-slave involved. The old men and the young soon succumbed and died. Middle-aged men survived the longest. But there was always a change going on. When the numbers of ...
— The Huguenots in France • Samuel Smiles

... serve as wood, and from whose bark is made bonote, a tow for rigging and cables, and also for calking ships. Efforts have been made to plant olives and quinces, and other fruit-trees of Espana, but as yet they have had no success, except with pomegranates and grapevines, which bear fruit the second year. These bear abundance of exceedingly good grapes three times a year; and some fig-trees have succeeded. Vegetables of every kind grow well and very abundantly, but do not seed, and it is always necessary to bring the seeds from ...
— History of the Philippine Islands Vols 1 and 2 • Antonio de Morga

... from Princeton in 1842, and the description of him left to us by Leland reveals a young man of nineteen, six feet tall, whose sculptured bust, made at this time, was not as much like him "as the ordinary busts of Lord Byron." In later years he was said to bear striking resemblance to Hawthorne. His marriage to Miss Julia Riggs, of Maryland, followed shortly after his graduation, in fact, while he was studying law, a profession which was to serve him in good stead during his diplomatic years, ...
— Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911: Francesca da Rimini • George Henry Boker

... had done as some careless maids do," her grandmother began, as she wiped, "I might have put this bowl right into the very hot water the tumblers can bear, and cracked it at once. Cut glass cannot bear either hot or cold water. I once had a beautiful bowl broken in two because it was held directly under the faucet in the sink while the hot water ran ...
— A Little Housekeeping Book for a Little Girl - Margaret's Saturday Mornings • Caroline French Benton

... shaken whisper solemnly, as if he were taking a formal and irrevocable vow, but there was no one to listen to it here, and bear witness to it as irrevocable. The girl did not answer him. Suddenly shy, breathing quickly, and trying to laugh, she slipped out of ...
— The Wishing Moon • Louise Elizabeth Dutton

... time. If the unfortunate lad, led away by some of his mates, wasted a day somewhere in the country, on the banks of the Viorne, or on the slopes of Garrigues, his father would storm and raise his hand, and long bear him a grudge on account of the four francs less that he received at the end of the fortnight. He thus held his son in a state of dependence, sometimes even looking upon the sweethearts whom the young carpenter courted as his own. Several of Gervaise's friends used to come to ...
— The Fortune of the Rougons • Emile Zola

... the other room, appropriated to the baby, a face peeped in, and Johnnie sprang to her side with earnest whispers: 'Mamma, may I not say my prayers with you! I will not wake papa, but I can't bear it without!' and the tears were in ...
— Heartsease - or Brother's Wife • Charlotte M. Yonge

... had been living in continual fear of since her father's death—that some disclosure would shock her—that she might come upon some phase of his past life which would not bear the full light of day. For Horace Carwell had not stinted himself of the pleasures of life as he saw them. He had eaten and drunk and he had made merry. And he was a gregarious man—one who did not like to take his ...
— The Golf Course Mystery • Chester K. Steele

... "I bear them in my bosom," said the son of Jevan; and, with much reverence, he delivered to the Prince a packet, bound with silk, and sealed with the impression of a swan, the ancient cognizance of the House of Berenger. Himself ignorant of writing or reading, Gwenwyn, in ...
— The Betrothed • Sir Walter Scott

... dismay from the visitors. They started to bear down Holmes, but all of the Army team had been prepared for this move from the instant the last signal; had been called. So it was the full force of the charging Army line that pushed Cadet Holmes through and over the ...
— Dick Prescott's Third Year at West Point - Standing Firm for Flag and Honor • H. Irving Hancock

... Commissioner of Agriculture to send their shares of the grain thus allowed them to the suffering farmers of Texas, they might be enabled to sow their crops, the constituents for whom in theory this grain is intended could well bear the temporary deprivation, and the donors would experience the satisfaction ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 3 (of 3) of Volume 8: Grover Cleveland, First Term. • Grover Cleveland

... as a good knight and true, as well as by the bones of the blessed St. Ursula, that you bear no ill will, secret enmity, wicked misprise or conspiracy, against the body of our noble lord and master Von Kolnsche? And you bring with you no ambush, siege, or surprise of retainers, neither secret warrant ...
— The Twins of Table Mountain and Other Stories • Bret Harte

... fire-shovel on the other. Whether the representatives of the public feeling of Eatanswill were blinded by animosity, or (being both acute reasoners) saw the advantage of having a third party between them to bear all the blows, certain it is that they paid not the slightest attention to Mr. Pickwick, but defying each other with great spirit, plied the carpet-bag and the fire-shovel most fearlessly. Mr. Pickwick would unquestionably ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... would pursue it. When reasoned with on the subject, she regarded such reasonings as a temptation to self- indulgence. She must be honest; she must not varnish, soften, nor conceal. This well-meant resolution brought on her misconstruction, and some abuse, which she bore, as it was her custom to bear whatever was unpleasant, with mild, steady patience. She was a very sincere, and practical Christian, but the tinge of religious melancholy communicated a sad shade to ...
— Charlotte Bronte's Notes on the pseudonyms used • Charlotte Bronte

... he kept sober after he turned in he'll be all right, I don't doubt; but if he took a bottle to bed with him—as he's lately got into the habit of doin'—the chances are that he'll turn out as savage as a bear with a sore head; and then everybody, fore and aft—passengers and all—will have to stand by and look ...
— A Middy in Command - A Tale of the Slave Squadron • Harry Collingwood

... face the blame of just men's eyes, And bear the fame of falsehood all his days, And wear out scorned life with useless lies, Which still the ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 17, No. - 482, March 26, 1831 • Various

... might be more suggestive of Sheriff's Officers than of those belonging to Her Majesty's Army; yet, as these gallant Dramatis Personae are avowedly wearing NATHAN's uniform (which may they never, never disgrace!) why should they not bear the proud title of "The First Royal Coventry Street Costumiers"? Let those most concerned see to it: our advice is gratis, and, at that ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 102, May 14, 1892 • Various

... ears be shocked by profane jests on the weight of your burden, as you bear away from the accustomed mansion, what was its light and its load star—but what is—pent up in your ...
— A Love Story • A Bushman

... bear it any longer, she screamed out in anguish, a scream which brought good Mrs. Ramsay running to her bedside, to find Mysie raving in a high fever, her eyes wildly glowing, and her skin all afire. The good lady sat with her and tried to soothe her, but Mysie kept calling ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh



Words linked to "Bear" :   Ursus thibetanus, frogmarch, digest, put forward, transport, assert, investment, pose, Ursus arctos, take lying down, bruin, clear, walk around, polar bear, Thalarctos maritimus, expect, endure, balance, displace, create, realize, face the music, Ursus ursinus, Ursus Maritimus, carnivore, make, ice bear, produce, bear in mind, earn, crop, deal, family Ursidae, kitten, sling, hold still for, bring in, pup, bear witness, freedom to bear arms, foal, litter, investor, bear's breech, pay off, take, twin, stick out, stand for, move, piggyback, calve, gain, overbear, permit, fawn, carry-the can, confine, feature, give birth, pull in, bear off, deport, retain, Selenarctos thibetanus, bring to bear, sit out, behave, comport, drop, spin off, act, realise, bear hug, poise, stomach, countenance, have young, have got, farrow, swallow, Euarctos americanus, stoop, include, fruit, Great Bear, fluster, hold in, conceive, Ursidae, let, Melursus ursinus, Ursus americanus, whelp, bring forth, investment funds, bear oak, skunk bear, net, deliver, bear claw, take a joke, enclose, bearer, pig, posture, bull, bear out, live with, seed, cub, have, allow, take in, lamb



Copyright © 2022 Dictionary One.com