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Somebody   Listen
noun
Somebody  n.  
1.
A person unknown or uncertain; a person indeterminate; some person. "Jesus said, Somebody hath touched me." "We must draw in somebody that may stand 'Twixt us and danger."
2.
A person of consideration or importance. "Before these days rose up Theudas, boasting himself to be somebody."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Somebody" Quotes from Famous Books



... beautiful bars of five different colours across it. The witches bore an awful resemblance to the Thanes and other inhabitants of Scotland; while the good King Duncan couldn't rest in his grave, but was constantly coming out of it and calling himself somebody else." These are all Crummles touches, only he refrained from going again over the old ground. But one point further favours the theory—he recalls his alarm when Richard in his terrific combat was "backing up against the stage box." He was ...
— Pickwickian Studies • Percy Fitzgerald

... dinner both. In it he melted lead for bullets, 355 To shoot at foes, and sometimes pullets, To whom he bore so fell a grutch, He ne'er gave quarter t' any such. The trenchant blade, Toledo trusty, For want of fighting, was grown rusty, 360 And ate unto itself, for lack Of somebody to hew and hack. The peaceful scabbard where it dwelt The rancour of its edge had felt; For of the lower end two handful 365 It had devour'd, 'twas so manful; And so much scorn'd to lurk in case, As if it durst not shew its face. In many desperate ...
— Hudibras • Samuel Butler

... nothings: about a new horse which Colonel Campian had just purchased, and which he wanted to show to Lothair; an old opera revived, but which sounded rather flat; something amusing that somebody had said, and something absurd which somebody had done. And then, when the ruffled feeling had been quite composed, and all had been brought back to the tenor of their usual pleasant life, Lothair said suddenly and rather ...
— Lothair • Benjamin Disraeli

... unjust, Parton," I said. "He certainly did look as if he had been in a maul with somebody. There was a nasty scratch on his face, and that cut on the arm was suspicious; but I can't see but that his explanation was clear enough. Your manner was too irritating. I think if I had met with an ...
— Ghosts I have Met and Some Others • John Kendrick Bangs

... It is the effort to place capital on an equal footing with, if not above, labor in the structure of government. It is assumed that labor is available only in connection with capital; that nobody labors unless somebody else, owning capital, somehow by the use of it induces him to labor. This assumed, it is next considered whether it is best that capital shall hire laborers, and thus induce them to work by their own consent, or buy them and drive them ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... at first. The crops failed last summer, and collections are hard. Williams has been pressing for money, and I hope all the family will treat him well, for he is the kind of man who might take out his spite upon me, for the sake of getting even with somebody else." ...
— A Forest Hearth: A Romance of Indiana in the Thirties • Charles Major

... his electioneering creed was, that every voter was controlled by somebody; and that the only way to sway the privates was, to govern the officers: and, whether true or not, it must be admitted that his theory worked well in practice. He affected to entertain a high respect for those whom he described as "the boys from the heads of the hollows"—men who were never seen ...
— Western Characters - or Types of Border Life in the Western States • J. L. McConnel

... stood out among college athletes as a wonderful example. He was very modest. I recall that some one once asked him how he made the only touchdown against Yale in the '93 game. His reply was: "Oh, somebody just pushed me over." ...
— Football Days - Memories of the Game and of the Men behind the Ball • William H. Edwards

... persist in it until they learn to long for it. Young lads regret that they are not men; they would like to go to bed boys and wake up men. Little Charlie and Harry see their fathers or uncles smoke, if not, then they see somebody's father or uncle puffing along the street, "taking comfort," and they think that is one of the essentials of being a man. So they get a pipe and fill it with tobacco, and as the parents, instead of ...
— Hidden Treasures - Why Some Succeed While Others Fail • Harry A. Lewis

... set down. I was jest wishin' I had somebody to talk to. Take that chair right by the door so's you can ...
— Aunt Jane of Kentucky • Eliza Calvert Hall

... "Somebody's been giving you the wrong tip. There wasn't any knife," replied the Professor with a wink. "You may send me two hundred and fifty copies of the paper. And, by the way, do what you can to get that poor lunatic off easy, and ...
— The Clarion • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... It belongs to mere brute liberty, which must be restrained and brought under bonds in order to render true liberty possible. Wild and lawless freedom must come under the restraints and limits of defined order, peace, and essential morality, or somebody's freedom must suffer, and social happiness is out of the question. And it is one of the inherent aims and offices of government to enforce this very constraint, without which it totally fails of its end and forfeits its right to be. ...
— Luther and the Reformation: - The Life-Springs of Our Liberties • Joseph A. Seiss

... Inquisition, which tortured the body on earth in order to save the soul for heaven, it is not to be denied that punishment for evil deeds is latent in the bowels of the evil doer and will make him suffer in one way or another. We cannot strike a bad condition without hitting somebody who is carrying it out; and I am in the position of the Quaker who went to war: "Friend," he admonished his foe-man, "thee is standing just where I am going ...
— The Subterranean Brotherhood • Julian Hawthorne

... a horrid mind, Gladys," she said at length. "If I encourage somebody you tell me I am flirting, and if I discourage him you tell me it comes to the same thing. And you do me an injustice. I haven't snubbed or discouraged him. I've—I've remained neutral, until I could make up my mind. Do you ...
— Daisy's Aunt • E. F. (Edward Frederic) Benson

... native countie of Kent; and therefore wished me to finish and publish what I had begun. Considering therefore that if I should not doe this myselfe, my papers might either perish, or be sold in an auction, and somebody else, as is not uncommon, put his name to my paines; and not knowing any one that would undertake this designe while I live, I have tumultuarily stitch't up what I have many yeares since collected; being chiefly but the observations of my frequent road between South and ...
— The Natural History of Wiltshire • John Aubrey

... the captain angrily: "it's a capital joke. Very funny, no doubt; but it strikes me somebody's going to laugh on the wrong side of his mouth. ...
— Old Gold - The Cruise of the "Jason" Brig • George Manville Fenn

... "Somebody snickered and, thinks I 'there's sprightly doin's hereabouts. I'll tarry a while and see 'em singe the fowl. I like the smell of burning pin feathers; it ...
— Pardners • Rex Beach

... Jim speaks the truth, sir," I exclaimed, unable to contain myself. "Somebody else stole the sugar and put it in ...
— Peter Trawl - The Adventures of a Whaler • W. H. G. Kingston

... must explain to you. Sir Lionel does come to see me very often; and I should think there was something in it—or, rather, I shouldn't be surprised at others thinking so—only that I am quite sure that he's thinking of somebody else." ...
— The Bertrams • Anthony Trollope

... and then go back and search upstairs again. Somebody may be hiding. Who here knows Miss Van ...
— Vicky Van • Carolyn Wells

... fate when the new lord and lady of the house came to live there. He had lived to be past twelve years old now; and had never had a friend, save this wild trooper, perhaps, and Father Holt; and had a fond and affectionate heart, tender to weakness, that would fain attach itself to somebody, and did not seem at rest until it had found a friend who would take charge ...
— The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. • W. M. Thackeray

... opened his mouth and gave such a yell that it is a wonder I didn't jump out of my skin. It frightened me so that I couldn't have moved if I had wanted to, which was a lucky thing for me. The instant he yelled he cocked his head on one side and listened. That yell must have wakened somebody and caused them to move, for Yowler turned suddenly and crept swiftly and without a sound out of sight. A minute later I heard a jump, and then I heard a fluttering. I think he caught one of the ...
— The Burgess Animal Book for Children • Thornton W. Burgess

... Long-Glats I saw them directing the great triennial feast tsa, at which they were the chief performers. The constant occupation of the blians, however, is to cure disease which is caused by a malicious antoh longing to eat human blood and desiring to drive away the human soul. When hungry an antoh makes somebody ill. The blian's rites, songs, dances, and sacrifices aim to induce a good antoh to chase away or kill the evil one which has taken possession of the patient, and thus make an opportunity for the frightened soul to return, which ...
— Through Central Borneo: - An Account of Two Years' Travel in the Land of Head-Hunters - Between the Years 1913 and 1917 • Carl Lumholtz

... not talk, Citizen Tinville—is that your name?" rejoined Lenoir, with a sneer—"if somebody didn't talk, nothing would get done. You all sit here, and condemn the Citizen-Deputy Merlin for being a fool, and I must say I am with you ...
— I Will Repay • Baroness Emmuska Orczy

... Bramley," I heard the Senator reply. "And now come and tell me if this loaf of bread somebody baked eighteen hundred and twenty something years ago isn't exactly the same shape as the Naples bakers are ...
— A Voyage of Consolation - (being in the nature of a sequel to the experiences of 'An - American girl in London') • Sara Jeannette Duncan

... he was somebody by the way they acted down at the station. I think he has a good face." The new girl had come over from the bureau and was looking up at the picture in ...
— Stanford Stories - Tales of a Young University • Charles K. Field

... among another barbarian nation that these among whom I am tarrying, being by nature a people who take their pleasures tragically, when they rise in the morning say, one to another, "Come, behold; it is raining again as usual; let us go out and kill somebody." Undoubtedly the pointed end of this adroit-witted saying may be found in the circumstance that it is, indeed, as the proverb aptly claims, raining on practically every occasion in life; while, to complete the comparison, for ...
— The Mirror of Kong Ho • Ernest Bramah

... Czar's habit thus to make himself a guest in his friends' houses, whether they were at home or not, and he is said once to have thus quartered himself upon somebody, with two hundred of ...
— Historical Miniatures • August Strindberg

... might bid for you, for without flattery, I think you a moral of a man, and an honour to Old Ireland. But O'Donahue, begging your pardon, if it's not a secret, who may have been this lady who appears to have bothered your brains not a little, since she could you forget somebody else?" ...
— The Poacher - Joseph Rushbrook • Frederick Marryat

... inevitable than seasickness, and may have something to do with it. It is like the ducking you get on crossing the line the first time. I trusted that these old customs were abolished. They might with the same propriety insist on blacking your face. I heard of one man who complained that somebody had stolen his boots in the night; and when he found them, he wanted to know what they had done to them,—they had spoiled them,— he never put that stuff on them; and the ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II, No. 8, June 1858 • Various

... broad-shouldered and a little inclined to be stout. "Now," he said with a pleasant smile at Marian, "I am willing to bet a cookie, that I can tell who this is. You look like your father, my dear. I knew him very well when I was younger, for I will venture to say you are a Miss Somebody Otway." ...
— Little Maid Marian • Amy E. Blanchard

... air-contraption ob his'n he calls de Hummin' Burd. He's ketched up fast on de balloon shed roof, an' dere he's hangin' wif sparks an' flames a-shootin' outer de airship suffin' scandalous! It's jest spittin' fire, dat's what it's a-doin', an' ef somebody don't do suffin' fo' Massa Tom mighty quick, dere ain't gwin t' be any Massa Tom; now dat's what ...
— Tom Swift and his Giant Cannon - or, The Longest Shots on Record • Victor Appleton

... of Punch's name, there are as many versions as of the origin of Punch itself. Hodder declares that it was Mayhew's sudden inspiration. Last asserted that when "somebody" at the "Edinburgh Castle" meeting spoke of the paper, like a good mixture of punch, being nothing without Lemon, Mayhew caught at the idea and cried, "A capital idea! We'll call it Punch!" Jovial Hal Baylis it was, says another, who, when refreshment time came round (it ...
— The History of "Punch" • M. H. Spielmann

... F. Taylor's poems, called 'January and June.' The little book opened of itself at a page containing verses entitled 'The Beautiful River.' An introductory paragraph read thus: 'On such a night, in such a June, who has not sat side by side with somebody for all the world like Jenny June? Maybe it was years ago, but it was some time. Maybe you had quite forgotten it, but you will be the better for remembering. Maybe she has gone on before where it is June all the year, and never January at all,—that God forbid. There it was, ...
— Memories of Jane Cunningham Croly, "Jenny June" • Various

... showing off before a great crowd of people, who seem to be waving their hats, as if they were shouting: 'Hurrah! Hurrah! Splendid! Splendid!' Oh, how I wish that I were an Indian boy, and had a Shetland pony; then might I travel from town to town and show off before the people, and be somebody, and so happy!" ...
— The Red Moccasins - A Story • Morrison Heady

... the great Revolution. He was about five-and-thirty, a widower, and had one child, likewise named Antoine, but familiarly known as Le Bossu (hunchback)—a designation derived, like his father's acres, from the Revolution, somebody having, during one of the earlier and livelier episodes of that exciting drama, thrown the poor little fellow out of a window in Strasbourg, and broken his back. When this happened, Antoine, pere, was a journeyman ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 442 - Volume 17, New Series, June 19, 1852 • Various

... think they would wait when they saw the trunk on the platform, papa? I should think they would know somebody was going away then, ...
— Ruby at School • Minnie E. Paull

... look after her. Somebody that knows how to manage a house and save money. She's lost running about here. Now, I had a young girl with me once was a wild useless thing when she came, and when she left me six months after, there wasn't a better trained, nor as meek a child in ...
— The Drone - A Play in Three Acts • Rutherford Mayne

... protesting with all their might against taking it. Polly and Jack declared that they would starve sooner than eat anything that hadn't been cooked over a camp-fire. Bell and Philip said that they should stand in front of it all the time, for fear somebody would ride through the canyon and catch them camping out with a stove. Imagine such a situation; it made them blush. Margery said she wished people weren't quite so practical, and wouldn't ruin nature by introducing such ugly and unnecessary things. She intended to point the moral by ...
— A Summer in a Canyon: A California Story • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... lest it should be discovered by the lantern of typography and clear redacting to letters, no better than nonsense or no sense. When I was young I used to chant with extacy Mild Arcadians ever blooming, till somebody told me it was meant to be nonsense. Even yet I have a lingering attachment to it, and think it better than Windsor Forest, Dying Xtian's address &c.—C. has sent his Tragedy to D.L.T.—it cannot be acted this season, and ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Vol. 5 • Edited by E. V. Lucas

... that could be owned, to aspire to the hand of a girl who was related to a royal house; and that though she did not require that the man who married her cousin should be a Bourbon, a Montmorency, or a Rohan, she did at least desire that he should be somebody, though it were but a gentleman of Gascony ...
— CELEBRATED CRIMES, COMPLETE - THE MARQUISE DE GANGES—1657 • ALEXANDRE DUMAS, PERE

... alone. For some raison or other I've the wish in me mind I was slingin' the whole of it into one of thim bog-houles out there—and that 'ud be no thing to go do on her.... And that was a quare story the ould woman had about thim gettin' married. Somebody was apt to be makin' a fool of her. Who was it would be tellin' her ...
— Strangers at Lisconnel • Barlow Jane

... it was a grindlestone, another he said "Nay; It's nought but an' owd fossil cheese, that somebody's roll't away." ...
— R. Caldecott's First Collection of Pictures and Songs • Various

... drowsiness of cold fell upon them, and they slept, embracing each other to keep warm. And while they slept, the gods covered them with a new futon—ghostly-white and very beautiful. And they did not feel cold any more. For many days they slept there; then somebody found them, and a bed was made for them in the hakaba of ...
— Glimpses of an Unfamiliar Japan • Lafcadio Hearn

... "Somebody's—coming!" she cried in the thinnest, most childlike treble. Her face shone; she tried to sit up; she raised one hand ...
— The Heart of Thunder Mountain • Edfrid A. Bingham

... nothings about the weather or their neighbours. The frozen commonplaceness of the scene was made for me still more oppressive by Signora dell' Acqua. She was evidently satirical, and could not be happy unless continually laughing at or with somebody. 'What a stick the woman will think me!' I kept saying to myself. 'How shall I ever invent jokes in this strange land? I cannot even flirt with her in Venetian! And here I have condemned myself—and her too, poor thing—to ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece • John Addington Symonds

... for puttin' me back in the mammoth class, but what I'm lookin' for is the feller that went into the dew after me. That certainly was a few damp moments. I was rattled, but I knew somebody grabbed me just before the light ...
— The Boy Scouts on the Yukon • Ralph Victor

... scrivener's then—or somebody's. But what concerns it whose? Enough, you loved her! And, shame upon you, let another ...
— The Hunchback • James Sheridan Knowles

... no pleasure I have dipped my hands in the corruption here exposed. Somebody must show that the Afro-American race is more sinned against than sinning, and it seems to have fallen upon me to do so. The awful death-roll that Judge Lynch is calling every week is appalling, not only because of the lives it takes, the rank cruelty and outrage ...
— Southern Horrors - Lynch Law in All Its Phases • Ida B. Wells-Barnett

... bought you at such a place, and now am come, as I promised, to pay the price." Bought me! said the poor man trembling, you bought but my horses. Nay, said the devil, I will let you know I bought yourself and farther said, He must either kill somebody, and the more excellent the person, the better it would be for him; and particularly charged him to kill Mr. Blair, else he would not free him. The man was so overcome with terror, thro' the violence of the ...
— Biographia Scoticana (Scots Worthies) • John Howie

... year ago young Christie had helped at the painting and graining of Lady Latimer's house. Somebody, a connoisseur in art, wandering last autumn in the Forest, had found him making a drawing of yew trees, had sought him in his home at the wheelwright's, had told him he was a genius and would ...
— The Vicissitudes of Bessie Fairfax • Harriet Parr

... got away from 'em, Virgie. The ole woman, Patty Cannon, set me free. I promised her I would kidnap somebody younger dan ole Samson. Bless de Lord! ...
— The Entailed Hat - Or, Patty Cannon's Times • George Alfred Townsend

... it damn near finished Pierre with me to think he'd take up with—a thing like you. But it's true. If somebody else had told me I'd of laughed at 'em. But it's true. Tell me: what'll you ...
— Riders of the Silences • Max Brand

... publicly in my message to Congress on the opening of the session. Not a single article of the treaty was ever made known beyond the members of the administration, nor would an article of it be known at this day, but for its publication in the newspapers, as communicated by somebody from beyond the water, as we have always understood. But as to myself, I can solemnly protest, as the most sacred of truths, that I never, one instant, lost sight of your reputation and favorable standing with your country, and never omitted to justify your failure to attain ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... ignoring the question. "You'll enjoy it. And it isn't all fleet and admiral. There's happiness, and romance, and whispering on the stairs. At night, when the lights are all blazing, and the band is playing waltzes in the casino, and somebody is giving a dinner in the grill-room, and the girls flit about in the shadows looking too sweet for words—well, Baldpate Inn is a rather entrancing spot. I remember those nights ...
— Seven Keys to Baldpate • Earl Derr Biggers

... somebody else has disappointed them, and they asked us at the last minute, to fill up?' suggested Edith, to whom ...
— Love at Second Sight • Ada Leverson

... Whether he's all alone or in a club. Of stupid books which seem to us a bore, The Bookworm will devour the very core. Did Solomon or somebody affirm The ...
— A Phenomenal Fauna • Carolyn Wells

... wherever you go," he said, steadily. "You can take that friendly or not, just as it pleases you. But if you've got any sense you'll not give these people out here a hunch against me. I might hurt somebody.... An' wouldn't it be better—to act friends? For I'm goin' to look after you, whether you like ...
— The Man of the Forest • Zane Grey

... instantaneous fire from the window to his machine. When he had collected his wits sufficiently, he ran outside to look. There was nothing there but a kind of grayish dust in a little mound—as if, as he put it, 'somebody had cleaned out a vacuum bag'. He went back in and examined the space from the window to the machine; there were two thin lines of dust there, hardly perceptible, just as if something had been attached to the machine and ...
— McIlvaine's Star • August Derleth

... precisely; but it's something that all the critics say of a book that is very strong, don't you know; and masterful; and relentless; and makes you feel as if somebody had taken you by the throat; and shakes you up awfully; and seems to throw you into the air, ...
— Imaginary Interviews • W. D. Howells

... prudent to say much, for some of the congregation were a little Arminian, and St. James could not be totally neglected. The worst of St. James was that when a sermon was preached from his Epistle, there was always a danger lest somebody in the congregation should think that it was against him it was levelled. There was no such danger, at any rate not so much, if the text was taken from the ...
— The Early Life of Mark Rutherford • Mark Rutherford

... he returned with a grin. "I told him to get somebody. Oh, we parted friends all right, old Thompson and I! He saw, just as I did, that he wasn't the man for the place. Macartney struck that vein first go off, and that was recommendation enough for me. But here's Thompson's, if you want to see it!" He extracted ...
— The La Chance Mine Mystery • Susan Carleton Jones

... the point). Well, but, you know, if there were a real Valley of Diamonds, somebody ...
— The Ethics of the Dust • John Ruskin

... one baby of Mrs. Evans's makes more trouble than all your eight. It cries every night so that somebody has to be up walking with it; it wears out all the nurses, and keeps poor Mrs. Evans ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 92, June, 1865 • Various

... is a rustle of robes and clink of steel and one old warrior leaps down, his armor sounding as he alights, and striking thrice his sword and shield together he calls on Gouverneur Morris to come forth. Somebody moves in the room where Morris died; there is a measured footfall in the corridor, with the clank of a scabbard keeping time; the door is opened, and on the blast that enters the widow hears a cry, then a double gallop, ...
— Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Complete • Charles M. Skinner

... out. Somebody must bring it in, of course. I fear it is Mrs. Karlgren, and I am simply going to tell her to keep away hereafter. The idea of her coming here practically begging, and then doing such a thing, after all I ...
— The Soul of a Child • Edwin Bjorkman

... of the walls he found the mark of an arrow's head, as though somebody had been killed or hit near by, and he asked, "Who was ...
— Hebraic Literature; Translations from the Talmud, Midrashim and - Kabbala • Various

... Burton assured him gaily. "Who would ever suspect that you or The General would do anything; but somebody did something in Oakdale last night and I want to take you back there and have a nice, long talk with you. ...
— The Oakdale Affair • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... good of you. But won't you love me, Kate? I don't deserve it. But I've read so often of beautiful women loving men who did not deserve it. Perhaps I may be worthy of it some day. And by that time you will have loved somebody else!" ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... this one lamp-post. Behind was the great scoop of darkness, as if all the night were there. In front, another wide, dark way opened over the hill brow. Occasionally somebody came out of this way and went into the field down the path. In a dozen yards the night had swallowed ...
— Sons and Lovers • David Herbert Lawrence

... faculty instantly on the alert, he snatched up the envelope from the desk, and listened. Was it imagination, a trick of nerves, or—no, there it was again!—a footfall on the gravel walk at the front of the house. The sound became louder, clearer—two footfalls instead of one. It was Stangeist, and somebody ...
— The Adventures of Jimmie Dale • Frank L. Packard

... stopped: they were in the courtyard of a robber's castle, the walls of which were cracked from top to bottom. Ravens and crows flew in and out of every hole, and big bulldogs, which each looked ready to devour somebody, jumped about as high as they could, but they did not bark, for it was not allowed. A big fire was burning in the middle of the stone floor of the smoky old hall. The smoke all went up to the ceiling, where it had to find a way out for itself. Soup was boiling in a big caldron over ...
— Stories from Hans Andersen • Hans Christian Andersen

... opened the glass door of the little bookcase to the right of the window, and ran eye and finger over the few rows of books. But as he stood there with his back to the room, just as the shadow of a bird's wing floats across the moonlight of a pool, he became suddenly conscious that something, somebody had passed across the doorway, and in passing had looked ...
— The Return • Walter de la Mare

... great consolation amidst all the evils of life, to know that, however bad your circumstances may be, there is always somebody else in nearly the same predicament. My chosen friend and ally, Bob M'Corkindale, was equally hard up with myself, and, if possible, more averse to exertion. Bob was essentially a speculative man—that is, in a philosophical ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 58, Number 360, October 1845 • Various

... our ears. Once a faint, whistling sound came from the far distance, that was all; and Esau went up to the biggest fir-tree whose trunk was clear of boughs, and he was about to use his knife, when we both jumped away from the tree. For from close at hand came a sharp, clear tap, as if somebody had touched the ground ...
— To The West • George Manville Fenn

... of father's books,' the child said earnestly, 'one that Dick Somebody wrote—a book that tells the meaning ...
— Odd • Amy Le Feuvre

... little impression upon him. Sometimes one arrives which attracts his attention, so that his mind seizes upon it and makes it its own, strengthens it by the addition of its force, and then casts it out again to affect somebody else. A man therefore, is not responsible for a thought which floats into his mind, because it may be not his, but someone else's; but he is responsible if he takes it up, dwells upon it and then ...
— A Textbook of Theosophy • C.W. Leadbeater

... mineral springs make wounds heal quickly? And yet the chance knowledge of the marvellous effect of gifted springs is probably as ancient as any sound knowledge as to medicine whatever. No doubt it was mere casual luck at first that tried these springs and found them answer. Somebody by accident tried them and by that accident was instantly cured. The chance which happily directed men in this one case, misdirected them in a thousand cases. Some expedition had answered when the resolution to undertake it was resolved ...
— Physics and Politics, or, Thoughts on the application of the principles of "natural selection" and "inheritance" to political society • Walter Bagehot

... soldiers or sailors dance in pairs, as a straightforward outlet for superfluous physical energy. Also, peasants in a ring—about a Maypole or something. Also, I very much like square dances and reels. There were enough that night for a quadrille, with somebody for the piano and even somebody to 'call off,'—but whoever sees a quadrille in these days? However, I mustn't burn any ...
— Bertram Cope's Year • Henry Blake Fuller

... Deb, "and I am going to give her a crown, 'for the greatest of these is Charity!' That yellow lily is the Shulamite. Miranda and I are going now to gather more ladies." She looked at Rand with large child's eyes. "If you want somebody to talk to, my sister Jacqueline is reading over ...
— Lewis Rand • Mary Johnston

... now that I'm a-rowin'," rejoined the shiftless one, "but when my turn at the oars is finished I wouldn't care. Ez I've said more'n once before, floatin' down a river with somebody else pullin' at the oars is the life jest ...
— The Scouts of the Valley • Joseph A. Altsheler

... the contrary, I could not get on for one solitary moment without somebody to teach me. Look you here, Davie: I have so many lessons given me, that I have no time or need to add to them any of my own. If you were to ask the cook to let you have a cold dinner, you would perhaps eat it with pride, and take ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... out, because he was a man who liked old customs. It had always been his way to spend the winters at home with his father, and now here was his father flitted to Greenland. So Biorn stood on the deck of his ship, very much put out. "Shall we break bulk?" somebody asked him. "No," says Biorn, "you will not do that. Let me think." When he had thought he told the ship's company that he was minded to go to Greenland after his father, and they agreed to make the voyage. He fastened down his cargo again, refitted, and ...
— Gudrid the Fair - A Tale of the Discovery of America • Maurice Hewlett

... might dig potatoes. One day, as he plodded along, a fairy must have whispered in his car; for he suddenly produced a little story, a gem, a treasure of a story, and hid it away in a jungle of chapters in a book called The Doctor. Somebody soon discovered the treasure; indeed, one might as well try to conceal a lighted candle as to hide a good story; and now it is the most famous work to be found in Southey's hundred volumes of prose and verse. Few professors could give you any information concerning The Doctor, ...
— Outlines of English and American Literature • William J. Long

... times for paw. I pastures myself with the fleetin' figures of romance the endoorin' time and enjoys myself a heap. When paw wasn't a dook or a pirate king, unbeknownst to himself, like as not he was Sir Marmaduke Trevelyun, or somebody entitled to the same ...
— Judith Of The Plains • Marie Manning

... "Well, we know who he is now. Somebody tipped off the officers about the run we was goin' to make to-night; and since it wasn't this kid, it must-a been one of his bunch. Shall we heave him into the stream, Joe, or ...
— The Boy Scouts on Picket Duty • Robert Shaler

... candelabra belonging to the parlor mantel was found lying on that closet floor," he observed. "Somebody has entered there lately, as lately as the day when Mr. ...
— The Filigree Ball • Anna Katharine Green

... we must do the finding for ourselves; therefore, if you have really grasped the principles of the science, you will frame rules of your own which will give you better results than any attempt to follow somebody else's method, which was successful in their hands precisely because it was theirs. Never fear to be yourself. If Mental Science does not teach you to be yourself it teaches you nothing. Yourself, more yourself, and yet more yourself is what you want; ...
— The Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science • Thomas Troward

... if you brought her? What made you tease me so? But there, I ought to have known better myself." She went to the foot of the pole and held out her arms, crying, "Kitty, kitty, kitty," but the kitten only mewed and faintly waved its tail. Alexandra turned away decidedly. "No, she won't come down. Somebody will have to go up after her. I saw the Linstrums' wagon in town. I'll go and see if I can find Carl. Maybe he can do something. Only you must stop crying, or I won't go a step. Where's your comforter? Did you leave it in the store? ...
— O Pioneers! • Willa Cather

... would be," returned Edgar with another bright smile. "I told him I wanted her for somebody else. Push on, Harry. Let's get round to ...
— Little Folks (October 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... permission to lie down where we were and get some sleep if we could! I lay down in the dirt at the roadside and had an hour or two's sleep. At about 3.30, when it was becoming light, I was awakened, my teeth chattering horribly, hearing the Brigadier-General strafing somebody! General Stockwell and his Staff seemed to be walking up and down all night. I saw them just before I went to sleep, and the first object which I saw on opening my eyes again was General Stockwell. I hear that poor ...
— At Ypres with Best-Dunkley • Thomas Hope Floyd

... taken the enemy will be before the gates of Paris in eight days. Alas!' he added, 'have I accustomed them to such great victories that they knew not how to bear one day's misfortune? What will become of poor France? I have done all I could for her!' He then heaved a deep sigh. Somebody asked to speak to him, and I left him, with a direction to come back at ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... If the Par be the result of a cross between the Salmon and the Trout, what becomes of it in the spring, and where are all the Par, which were so abundant in October, gone to in April? Did they migrate to the sea, the shoals would be met with by somebody; and did they stay in the river they would be caught at one time or other. However, as it is well known that neither of these cases is ever realized, we must suppose another, which I have already done in my former communication. In fact, in angling in the beginning of March, fish are often ...
— Essays in Natural History and Agriculture • Thomas Garnett

... were Madame des Vanneaulx," said a wit, "I shouldn't torment my uncle about it; if somebody murders him, why, let him be murdered! ...
— The Village Rector • Honore de Balzac

... for a moment, forgetting for the time his own anxieties. He liked a skilled hand, and he liked push and grit. This woman seemed to possess all three. He was amazed at the way in which she handled her men. He wished somebody as clearheaded and as capable were unloading his boat. He began to wonder who she might be. There was no mistaking her nationality. Slight as was her accent, her direct descent from the land of the shamrock and the shilla-lah was not to be doubted. The very tones ...
— Tom Grogan • F. Hopkinson Smith

... hand a piece of money; and I, as I consider it wise, in like cases, to do as is done by those about me, followed the example. The officer took the coin, smiled graciously upon me, affixed the stamp unhesitatingly to my credentials, and turned to somebody else. I really could not quite explain to myself why this act of extravagance had been committed, but I am not aware that I ever missed the douceur; and I heartily wish the individual who received it, much ...
— Germany, Bohemia, and Hungary, Visited in 1837. Vol. II • G. R. Gleig

... quite naturally, to set the doer above the critic, who, he thought, quickly degenerated into a fault finder and from that into a common scold. When a man plunges into a river to save somebody from drowning, if you do not plunge in yourself, at least do not jeer at him for his method of swimming. So Roosevelt, who shrank from no bodily or moral risk himself, held in scorn the "timid good," the " acidly ...
— Theodore Roosevelt; An Intimate Biography, • William Roscoe Thayer

... tumble-down old shanty we have just passed,—so poor that nobody'd take the gift of it. People said that he'd orter go to the poorhouse, so that when he was sick—which was pretty much all the time—he'd have somebody to take care of him. But he'd got kinder attached to the old place, seein' he was born there, and never lived anywhere else, and ...
— Paul Prescott's Charge • Horatio Alger

... greatly excited—"Fra Pacifico, the Marchesa Guinigi's chaplain. He's come down from Corellia for the festival."—Carlotta is proud to show that she knows somebody, as well as Cassandra. "When he is in Lucca, Fra Pacifico passes my shop every morning to say mass in the marchesa's private chapel. He knows ...
— The Italians • Frances Elliot

... suited to each other. Ferdinand must marry some one whom he looks up to, somebody brilliant like himself, some one who can sympathise with all his fancies. I am too calm and quiet for him. You would suit him ...
— Henrietta Temple - A Love Story • Benjamin Disraeli

... spear fall into the hollow of his arm, and placing both hands to his mouth, produced a peculiarly deep, sweet-toned whistle, which sounded as if somebody were incorrectly running up ...
— The Dingo Boys - The Squatters of Wallaby Range • G. Manville Fenn

... suppose then I am to go and find somebody else—a forlorn young man going to find a lady to take care of him. Come, Miss Lucy, cannot you recommend ...
— The Youth of Jefferson - A Chronicle of College Scrapes at Williamsburg, in Virginia, A.D. 1764 • Anonymous

... the captain. "I can't have a monkey on top of my ship's mast! Somebody climb up after him ...
— Mappo, the Merry Monkey • Richard Barnum

... Mrs. Bunting sullenly. "I'm fair tired of you both! There'll come a day, Daisy, when you'll know, like me, that money is the main thing that matters in this world; and when your Aunt Margaret's left her savings to somebody else just because you wouldn't spend a few days with her this Christmas, then you'll know what it's like to go without—you'll know what a fool you were, and that nothing ...
— The Lodger • Marie Belloc Lowndes

... gardens, wherein tall cypress-trees pointed to the tender sky. They rode through the gardens and sundry gateways till they came to a courtyard where servants, with torches in their hands, ran out to meet them. Somebody helped him off his horse, somebody supported him up a flight of marble steps, beneath which a fountain splashed, into a great, cool room with an ornamented roof. Then Peter remembered ...
— Fair Margaret • H. Rider Haggard

... out on Cozzens' piazza Too late, when the evenings were damp, When the moon-beams were silvering Cro'nest, And the lights were all out in the camp. You've rested on highly-oiled stairways Too often, when sweet eyes were bright, And somebody's ball dress—not Nellie's— Flowed 'round you ...
— Point Lace and Diamonds • George A. Baker, Jr.

... so, or perhaps Dutch made by Italian artists; but older than that, for somebody has burnt 1597 on the lid with a hot iron. Not for sale, not for sale at all, much too good to sell. Just you look inside it, the old key is tied to the spring lock. Never saw such poker-work in my life. Gods and goddesses and I don't know what; and Venus sitting ...
— The Virgin of the Sun • H. R. Haggard

... miller in those parts; but as he was the only one, people who quarrelled with an exclusively meat diet continued to patronize him. He was honest, as all stupid people are; but he was careless. So absent-minded was he, that sometimes when grinding somebody's wheat he would thoughtlessly turn into the "hopper" a bag of rye, a lot of old beer-bottles, or a basket of fish. This made the flour so peculiar, that the people about there never knew what it was to be well a day in all their lives. There were so many local diseases in that vicinity, ...
— Cobwebs From an Empty Skull • Ambrose Bierce (AKA: Dod Grile)

... Paris, Chopin stopped also at Heidelberg, where he visited the father of his pupil Adolph Gutmann, who treated him, as one of his daughters remarked, not like a prince or even a king, but like somebody far superior to either. The children were taught to look up to Chopin as one who had no equal in his line. And the daughter already referred to wrote more than thirty years afterwards that Chopin still stood out in her memory as the most ...
— Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician - Volume 1-2, Complete • Frederick Niecks



Words linked to "Somebody" :   abomination, grownup, cross-dresser, denizen, pamperer, coward, good guy, grinner, applier, namer, fleer, drooler, free spirit, divider, ethnic, acquaintance, apprehender, cashier, essayer, dancer, departed, Israelite, hugger, dresser, Aries, authority, mixed-blood, nonperson, enrollee, counter, manipulator, mover and shaker, agnostic, lefty, money dealer, demander, outcaste, huddler, dweller, baby buster, nurser, free agent, emotional person, person, disputant, man jack, buster, defecator, mestizo, face, abator, dead soul, nondescript, hater, intellectual, compeer, gem, nondrinker, homo, advocate, heterosexual, carrottop, mollycoddler, objector, equal, commoner, nonsmoker, junior, killer, extravert, have, match, baldpate, brunette, censor, allayer, engineer, appreciator, degrader, case, musclebuilder, Capricorn, best, muscle-builder, bodybuilder, expectorator, bad person, kink, hope, chooser, acquirer, appointment, interpreter, blackamoor, neutral, debitor, image, bereaved, emulator, changer, homophile, negro, mutilator, deviser, deliverer, communicator, owner, machine, attempter, baby, creature, party, passer, anti-American, soul, balance, neighbor, dribbler, modifier, ejector, anomaly, homosexual, jumper, cloud seeder, amateur, follower, boomer, loose cannon, Aquarius, bull, celebrator, nonparticipant, differentiator, national, decedent, affiant, learner, baldy, blonde, appointee, male, combatant, heterosexual person, negroid, beguiler, Elizabethan, left-hander, fighter, asthmatic, mesomorph, baulker, opposer, handicapped person, baby boomer, controversialist, ectomorph, adventurer, lover, gatherer, occultist, man, nonworker, convert, bomber, cause, blogger, lightning rod, leader, bather, female person, knower, autodidact, Libra, opener, eristic, abstinent, Leo, misogamist, neighbour, beard, muscleman, opponent, masturbator, indigene, literate person, friend, mailer, drug user, dieter, nude person, common man, gatekeeper, counterterrorist, gentile, ouster, pardoner, Latin, creditor, chutzpanik, first-rater, enjoyer, modern, liver, cripple, knocker, experimenter, ape, intellect, insured, balker, causal agency, Black person, forerunner, linguist, debaser, homunculus, good person, Gemini, adversary, common person



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