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Scull   Listen
verb
Scull  v. i.  To impel a boat with a scull or sculls.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Scull" Quotes from Famous Books



... just thinking we would do better with one," and, shipping his own oar in the stern of the boat, he began to scull. ...
— The Woman Thou Gavest Me - Being the Story of Mary O'Neill • Hall Caine

... the sleeves were traced the long bones of the arms, with the large shoulder-blades, elbow-joints, and wrists; the bones of the hands were traced in white upon tight-fitting black gloves, and those of the feet upon tight-fitting black socks: a round scull-cap was to be drawn over the head; this was all white, to represent the skull, and had its skeleton features ...
— Cruel As The Grave • Mrs. Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... MY DEAR SCULL It has been asked by some what the object of the Buffalo Jones African Expedition was. ...
— Stories from Everybody's Magazine • 1910 issues of Everybody's Magazine

... such length that a pair of them, one on each side, are conveniently managed by a single rower sitting in the middle of the boat. Also, a light metal-helmet worn in our early fleet.—To scull. To row a boat with a pair of sculls. Also, to propel a boat by a particular method of managing a single oar over the boat's stern, and reversing the blade each time. It is in fact the half-stroke of the screw rapidly reversed, and closely resembles ...
— The Sailor's Word-Book • William Henry Smyth

... doubted, whether his late enemy It were, or other new supplied knight. 310 He, now to prove his late renewed might, High brandishing his bright deaw-burning blade,[*] Upon his crested scalpe so sore did smite, That to the scull a yawning wound it made; The deadly dint his dulled senses all ...
— Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I • Edmund Spenser

... weir-piles, and beheld the sweet vision. Stiller and stiller grew nature, as at the meeting of two electric clouds. Her posture was so graceful, that though he was making straight for the weir, he dared not dip a scull. Just then one enticing dewberry caught her eyes. He was floating by unheeded, and saw that her hand stretched low, and could not gather what it sought. A stroke from his right brought him beside her. The damsel glanced up dismayed, and her whole shape trembled over the brink. ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... the trees where they dangle from the branch tips, their scales gaping and the seeds for the most part gone. Left to themselves they have been flying away ever since September, a few at a time on dry, windy days when their single wings would scull them farthest. One might impute instinct or whatever it is to the pine tree too, she works so methodically for the preservation of her species. A year ago last spring the mother pine put forth the beginnings of those ...
— Old Plymouth Trails • Winthrop Packard

... sir, Dangerously; he has purg'd his stomack, but the ill spiritts Are flowne into his head and spoild his eares. He was ever troubled with Devices in his head; I stronglie feare he must have his scull open'd, His brains are very foule within. I know And can direct you to ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. II • Various

... acquaintance, when the thought came like a surprise that I was alone with Alice. The fair and pleasant damsel made a clever descent into the boat, and having seated herself, she began to twirl the scull in the rowlock, and said: 'Do you feel disposed to join me in looking after the other scull and papa's hat, Mr. Pollingray?' I suggested 'Will you not get your feet wet? I couldn't manage to empty all the ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... the possession of the French, his course for a time seemed effectually cut off. By the merest chance he fell in with some Negro fishermen who informed him of a passage known as Wall's cut, through Scull's creek, navigable for small boats. A favoring tide and a dense fog enabled him to conduct his command unperceived by the French, through this route, and thus arrive in Savannah on the afternoon of the 17th, before the expiration of the twenty-four hours. General ...
— The Colored Regulars in the United States Army • T. G. Steward

... rather get in with Nat and Ned," she said, as the party prepared to get off in the boats. "I am really too tired to scull." ...
— Dorothy Dale's Camping Days • Margaret Penrose

... he answered. "But there is no reason why we should not make the most of this chance meeting. There is my boat. Tie your horse to a tree and allow me to scull you up ...
— Grey Town - An Australian Story • Gerald Baldwin

... though the earlier grooves That ran the laughing loves Around thy base no longer pause and press? What though, about thy rim, Scull things in order grim Grow out, in graver mood, obey ...
— Name and Fame - A Novel • Adeline Sergeant

... remembrance there were digged up in the churchyard at Amesbury, which is very spacious, a great number of huge bones, exceeding, as he sayes, the size of those of our dayes. At Highworth, at the signe of the Bull, at one Hartwells, I have been credibly enformed is to be seen a scull of-a vast bignesse, scilicet half as big again as an ordinary one. From Mr. Kich. Brown, Rector of Somerford Magna, (At Wotton in Surrey, where my brother enlarged the vault in which our family are buried, digging away the earth for the foundations, ...
— The Natural History of Wiltshire • John Aubrey

... softly cried the trapper; "I know the thicket he is hailing from. If you will remain just where you are, I will scull my canoe down to the spot, take him in with me, if he has not found a boat,—or at any rate bring him here to make ...
— Gaut Gurley • D. P. Thompson

... Channel, and which always had a fog handy to run into, but out of which no man could truly say he ever saw her come again! This skiff may have plied between the land and that Guernseyman, for any thing I know to the contrary; but it is not a boat I wish to pull a scull in." ...
— The Red Rover • James Fenimore Cooper

... one minute to six hours during the day. In the second and third years she averaged four hours wakefulness in ninety-six hours. She took very little nourishment and sometimes had no bowel-movement for sixteen days. Scull reports the history of a man of twenty-seven suffering with incipient phthisis, who remained bedridden and in a state of unconsciousness for fifteen months. One day while being fed he spoke out and asked for a glass of water in his ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... water. The keel is convex in the centre, to enable it to be turned more easily; and for the same reason it is steered by an oar instead of a rudder. The oar can also turn a boat when she is at rest, and can scull her in calm weather up to a whale without noise. A large-size boat is pulled by five oars, and one to steer, and a small one by four oars; the first being from twenty-six to twenty-eight feet long, and the last from ...
— Peter the Whaler • W.H.G. Kingston

... He seized his scull. Even at that moment there was a terrific explosion. A stream of lurid fire seemed to leap from the corner of the house, the wall split and fell outwards. And then there came another sound, hideous, sickly, a sound Granet had heard before, the sound of a rifle bullet cutting ...
— The Kingdom of the Blind • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... a wineglassful four times a day for continued use. For hysteria attacks, asthma spasms, less should be used and taken oftener for a few doses. The following combination is effective for the spasmodic attacks, above named: Cramp bark two ounces, scull cap and skunk cabbage one ounce each, cloves one-half ounce, capsicum two even teaspoonfuls. Powder all, and bruise and add to them two quarts of good native wine. Dose: one or two ounces two or three times a day; ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... a long day and a beautiful one besides, and we decided that each should jump into a skiff, and scull to Cliveden, many miles up the river. This we performed in a very satisfactory manner, except that, on our return, just when we were opposite the beautiful little village of Bray, resting on our oars, and responding to each other the alternate verses of that aquatic ...
— Confessions of an Etonian • I. E. M.

... hatchet. 16. Distaff with string of hair upon it. 17. Lenko, or net hung round the neck in diving to put muscles, etc. in. 18. Kenderanko, net used in diving, vide p. 260. 19. Drinking cup made of a shell. 20. Drinking cup, being the scull of a native with the sutures closed ...
— Journals Of Expeditions Of Discovery Into Central • Edward John Eyre

... next day by a scraping below, and coming down, we found our painter in a scull-cap and a smock that covered him to his heels, upon his scaffold, preparing the ceiling in a very workmanlike manner. And to see him then, with his face and beard thickly crusted over with a mess of ...
— A Set of Rogues • Frank Barrett

... I had rather seeme, and dull, Sooner my faults may please make me a gull, Than to be wise, and beat my vexed scull. ...
— Literary and Philosophical Essays • Various

... luck this morning, that Mr. William took the lower road; for if he had come up with you instead of me, he'd blow the roof off your scull, that's all." ...
— The Confessions of Harry Lorrequer, Vol. 2 • Charles James Lever

... commenced to scull the canoe's nose before the wind, while I made fast the primitive sheets that held our crude sail. We thought it time ...
— Pellucidar • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... wax match several hours later he found that it was midnight. His struggle with wind and sea had now become unequal. He found it impractical to remain longer in the stern attempting to scull. So very cautiously he set about his last ...
— The Harbor of Doubt • Frank Williams

... sublimity! I said to myself, 'How dared I marry so much beauty and womanly majesty? Doing so, I have tempted the old gods and their fates and furies. This is poetical punishment for my temerity.' Still all the while I was laboring at the one scull left in the boat while my brain was fuming so, and listening for sounds on the water. I heard the sailor cry twice, and then his voice fainted away. I began to weep at the oar while I strained upon it, and called 'Help!' and implored God's intervention. At last I sat down in the boat, worn ...
— Bohemian Days - Three American Tales • Geo. Alfred Townsend

... in trooper, we've fought 'em in dock, and drunk with 'em in betweens, When they called us the seasick scull'ry-maids, an' we called 'em the Ass Marines; But, when we was down for a double fatigue, from Woolwich to Bernardmyo, We sent for the Jollies — 'Er Majesty's Jollies — soldier an' sailor too! They think for 'emselves, an' they steal for 'emselves, and they never ...
— Verses 1889-1896 • Rudyard Kipling

... a band of young children strewing flowers, then followed four stout boys carrying a large purple and white banner. The victor, proudly preceding the other candidates, strutted forward, with his hat on one side, a light scull decorated with purple and white ribbons in his right hand, and his left arm round his wife's waist. The wife, a beautiful young woman, to whom were clinging two fat flaxen-headed children, was the most interesting figure in the procession. Her tight dark bodice set off her round ...
— Vivian Grey • The Earl of Beaconsfield

... Ham. That Scull had a tongue in it, and could sing once: how the knaue iowles it to th' grownd, [Sidenote: the] as if it were Caines Iaw-bone, that did the first [Sidenote: twere] murther: It might be the Pate of ...
— The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark - A Study with the Text of the Folio of 1623 • George MacDonald

... this chap uses these gills for the same purpose as the steamer uses its screw—to scull through ...
— Little Busybodies - The Life of Crickets, Ants, Bees, Beetles, and Other Busybodies • Jeanette Augustus Marks and Julia Moody

... well for Elsie that she had learnt how to scull when in her teens, and that her muscles were in fair condition owing to her skill at tennis. Even so, she feared that she could never hold out against the sustained stress of that pull across the bay. The heavy boat, intended to be rowed by six men, had the added burthen ...
— The Captain of the Kansas • Louis Tracy

... an honest living by plying the oar, or swinging on the scull-beam with babies strapped on their backs. One may notice also the so-called "flower-boats," embellished like the palaces of water fairies. Moored in one locality, they are a well-known resort of ...
— The Awakening of China • W.A.P. Martin

... FREDERICK, the courteous President, pointing out to Royal Highnesses the beauties of Burlington House. Stars, ribands, and garters everywhere. Exceptionally distinguished personages come in with invitations only, and no orders. Pretty to see Cardinal MANNING's bright scarlet scull-cap, quite eclipsing RUSTEM PASHA's fez. Cardinal distinctly observed to smile during MARKISS's humorous observations. "MARKISS is ready," sounds like twin phrase to "Barkis is willin'." H.R.H.'s speech shorter than ever. Wonderful, too, how eloquent Sir FREDERICK contrives ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 98, 1890.05.10 • Various

... creaking of the oar." (The word kaji to-day means "helm";—the single oar, or scull, working upon a pivot, and serving at once for rudder and oar, being now called ro.) The mist passing across the Amanogawa is, according to commentators, the spray from ...
— The Romance of the Milky Way - And Other Studies & Stories • Lafcadio Hearn

... interesting to learn what we can of his methods. In considering the Hera head he first examined the original, afterwards a cast of it for many hours, then compared these impressions with observations made upon a human scull. In doing this he brings the work of art to nature, so as to substantiate or correct his impressions. We see him following the same method in the articles upon the Medusa and upon Asklepios. But this reference to nature is for the most part casual and incidental. It is not to nature but ...
— The American Journal of Archaeology, 1893-1 • Various

... company. Sergeant Martin L. Hower, Richard Davis, Jacob Eschenbach, Jephtha Milligan, Allen Sparks, Obadiah Sherwood, and David C. Young had been killed in battle or died of wounds; Thomas D. Davis, Jesse P. Kortz, Samuel Snyder, James Scull, Solon Searles, and John W. Wright had died in the service. The most conspicuous figure in the regiment, our colonel, Richard A. Oakford, had been the first to fall. So that amidst our rejoicings there were a multitude of hearts unutterably sad. Will the time ever come when "the bitter ...
— War from the Inside • Frederick L. (Frederick Lyman) Hitchcock

... world, whether I'm connected with it or not. This silver agitation has caught us right in mid-ocean, and we're having a little trouble weathering the storm. I'm a perfectly frank man when it comes to close business relations of this kind, and I'm going to tell you just how things stand. If we can scull over this rough place that has come up on account of the silver agitation our stock will go to three hundred before the first of the year. Now, if you want to take it you can have it outright at one hundred and fifty dollars—that is, providing you'll agree not to throw any ...
— The Titan • Theodore Dreiser

... jest itself, bottled in high spirits, and in a fair state of preservation. As clearly as can be deciphered, the legend is something about "an Indian," "an oarsman," and "feathering a scull," or "skull." ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, June 27, 1891 • Various

... was loaded and the three swung her out of the davits into the sea below. Then they threw down a rope ladder and climbed below. Greer went back to the stern, picked up an oar and began to scull. ...
— The Cruise of the Dry Dock • T. S. Stribling

... sits sideways along the middle of the boat, all facing the starboard. They do not attempt to row. One man does all the work with one scull. This scull he puts down through the water till it touches the bed of the ocean, and then ...
— Stage-Land • Jerome K. Jerome

... help of a valet, the count, with my nephew and me, were introduced by his son, and received with his usual stile of rustic civility; then turning to signor Macaroni, with a sarcastic grin, 'I tell thee what, Dick (said he), a man's scull is not to be bored every time his head is broken; and I'll convince thee and thy mother, that I know as many tricks as e'er an old fox ...
— The Expedition of Humphry Clinker • Tobias Smollett

... rest of the turns where you sit; the sail is a lug by the feel of it—at all events, here is a yard of some sort lying alongside the mast—and when you have cast off the lashings and are ready to step the mast, say the word, and lay in your oar; then I'll scull the boat, whilst you step the mast and hoist the sail. Hurrah! here comes the breeze, hot and strong; get the canvas on her, and at last we shall be able to enjoy a rest. If those fellows are wise now, they'll 'bout ship ...
— The Voyage of the Aurora • Harry Collingwood

... meditates—as of a thing apart from him—upon his poor aching head, and that dull pain which, dozing or waking, lay in it all the past night like a log, or palpable substance of pain, not to be removed without opening the very scull, as it seemed, to take it thence. Or he pities his long, clammy, attenuated fingers. He compassionates himself all over; and his bed is a very discipline of ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Volume 2 • Charles Lamb

... his alter ego, were not allowed to remain unmolested in their grave in St. Michael's Church, St. Albans. Thomas Fuller, in his Worthies, relates as follows: "Since I have read that his grave being occasionally opened [!] his scull (the relique of civil veneration) was by one King, a Doctor of Physick, made the object of scorn and contempt; but he who then derided the dead has since become the laughingstock of the living." This, being quoted by a correspondent in Notes and Queries {27a} ...
— Shakespeare's Bones • C. M. Ingleby

... acknowledge, with all due Gratitude, that in some Cases you have given us our Revenge on the Men, and done us Justice. We could not easily have forgiven you several Strokes in the Dissection of the Coquets Heart, if you had not, much about the same time, made a Sacrifice to us of a Beaus Scull. ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... sighted about ten walruses two miles away, and MacMillan and I, Dennis Murphy, a sailor, and three Eskimos manned a whale-boat, and off we went. About two hundred yards from the walruses we quit rowing and let Murphy scull us, while Mac and I crouched side by side in the bow, the Eskimos with their harpoons ...
— The North Pole - Its Discovery in 1909 under the auspices of the Peary Arctic Club • Robert E. Peary

... window is the remains of a legend that once spelt BARBER SHOP, executed with the flourishes that prevailed in the golden age of sign painting in Mariposa. Through the window you can see the geraniums in the window shelf and behind them Jeff Thorpe with his little black scull cap on and his spectacles drooped upon his nose as he bends forward ...
— Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town • Stephen Leacock

... mind gallantly to scull the thing across. The announcement brought Joan to the edge of ...
— Kenny • Leona Dalrymple

... under any of these heads; as between 'ounce' and 'inch'; 'errant' and 'arrant'; 'slack' and 'slake'; 'slow' and 'slough'{115}; 'bow' and 'bough'; 'hew' and 'hough'{115}; 'dies' and 'dice' (both plurals of 'die'); 'plunge' and 'flounce'{115}; 'staff' and 'stave'; 'scull' and 'shoal'; 'benefit' and 'benefice'{116}. Or, it may be, the difference which constitutes the two forms of the word into two words is in the spelling only, and of a character to be appreciable only by the eye, escaping altogether the ear: thus it ...
— English Past and Present • Richard Chenevix Trench

... SCULLER. A boat rowed by one man with a light kind of oar, called a scull; also a ...
— 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue • Captain Grose et al.

... [Sidenote: Wil. Malm. Hen. Hunt. Matth. West.] is not to be credited, bicause of the vnlikelihood of the thing it selfe, and also generall consent of other writers, who affirme vniuersallie that he was killed in the battell, first being striken thorough the left eie by the scull into the braine with an arrow, wherevpon falling from his horsse to the ground, he was slaine in [Sidenote: Floriac. Simon Dun.] that place, after he had reigned nine moneths and nine daies, as Floriacensis dooth report. He was a man of a comelie stature, and of a hawtie courage, & albeit ...
— Chronicles (1 of 6): The Historie of England (8 of 8) - The Eight Booke of the Historie of England • Raphael Holinshed

... and Windsor, from Asia and Africa—and gather and pass opposite the window just to entertain me. One man floated out of the infinite the day before yesterday, caught one perfect crab opposite, lost and recovered a scull, and passed on again. Probably he will never come into my life again. So far as I am concerned, he has lived and had his little troubles, perhaps thirty—perhaps forty—years on the earth, merely to make an ass of himself for three minutes in front of my window. ...
— The Stolen Bacillus and Other Incidents • H. G. (Herbert George) Wells

... Boat Racing is the popular sport of crew rowing or sculling, where each college appoints a crew of eight strong scull pullers or oarsmen and one small coxswain or steersman to pilot a long narrow boat called a skiff or shell. The coxswain calls the strokes and is generally the coach and commander of the crew. Unlike in a canoe, ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... into the long-boat. Paddy pushed the dinghy a few yards away with the tip of a scull, and then lay on ...
— The Blue Lagoon - A Romance • H. de Vere Stacpoole

... were united into one Double Eye, which was placed just in the middle of the Brow, the Nose being wanting, which should have separated them, whereby the two Eye-holes in the Scull were united into one very large round hole, into the midst of which, from the Brain, entred one pretty large Optik Nerve, at the end of which grew a great Double Eye; that is, that Membrane, called Sclerotis, which contained both, was one and the same, but seemed ...
— Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society - Vol 1 - 1666 • Various

... me, and I jumped up to seize a scull, but felt giddy and nearly fell, for Bob Chowne ...
— Devon Boys - A Tale of the North Shore • George Manville Fenn

... though the earlier grooves Which ran the laughing loves Around thy base, no longer pause and press? What though, about thy rim, Scull-things in order grim Grow out, in graver mood, ...
— Robert Browning: How To Know Him • William Lyon Phelps

... in a green church-yard, And let his spirit, like a demon-mole, Work through the clayey soil and gravel hard, To see scull, coffin'd bones, and funeral stole; Pitying each form that hungry Death hath marr'd, And filling it once more with human soul? Ah! this is holiday to what was felt When ...
— Keats: Poems Published in 1820 • John Keats



Words linked to "Scull" :   oar, row, sculler, athletics, racing shell, sculling, sport



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