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Lave   Listen
noun
Lave  n.  The remainder; others. (Scot.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Lave" Quotes from Famous Books



... Loves Dragged downward by her dying doves; Vulcan, spun on a wheel, shall track The circle of the zodiac; Silver Artemis be lost, To the polar blizzards tossed; Heaven shall curdle as with blood; The sun be swallowed in the flood; The universe be silent save For the low drone of winds that lave The shadowed great world's ashen sides As through the rustling void she glides. Then shall there be a whisper heard Of the Grave's Secret and its Word, Where in black silence none shall cry Save those who, dead-affrighted, spy How from the murmurous graveyards ...
— Georgian Poetry 1916-17 • Various

... all the lave of them," said another, "snurling up her neb at a man for lack of gear. Why didna he brag of some ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... once beheld, must ever after be the sea of his adoption. It rolls the midmost waters of the world, the Indian ocean and Atlantic being but its arms. The same waves wash the moles of the new-built Californian towns, but yesterday planted by the recentest race of men, and lave the faded but still gorgeous skirts of Asiatic lands, older than Abraham; while all between float milky-ways of coral isles, and low-lying, endless, unknown Archipelagoes, and impenetrable Japans. Thus ...
— Moby-Dick • Melville

... little children, your lauds do ye upraise To Sylvia, O Sylvia, her sweet, feat ways! Your lovesome labours lay away, And trick you out in holiday, For syllabling to Sylvia; And all you birds on branches, lave your mouths with May, To bear with me this burthen, For singing ...
— Sister Songs • Francis Thompson

... me ryke up to dight that tear, And go wi' me and be my dear, And then your every care and fear May whistle owre the lave o't. ...
— The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. • Robert Burns and Allan Cunningham

... way: Out leaps a hair-brained fellow and attacks With a stout cudgel mule's and boatman's backs: And so at length, thanks to this vigorous friend, By ten o'clock we reach our boating's end. Tired with the voyage, face and hands we lave In pure Feronia's hospitable wave. We take some food, then creep three miles or so To Anxur, built on cliffs that gleam like snow; There rest awhile, for there our mates were due, Maecenas and Cocceius, good and true, Sent on a weighty business, to compose A feud, and make them friends who late ...
— The Satires, Epistles, and Art of Poetry • Horace

... roof, leaving behind trunks and branches of trees firmly wedged in the clefts of the rock in the inside. It was extremely interesting to stand on this spot and see before me this wonderful Etruscan work, and to lave my hands in the waters of the Formello, which, under the classical name of the Cremera, was prominently associated with early Roman history. It would be difficult to find a lovelier dimple in the fair ...
— Roman Mosaics - Or, Studies in Rome and Its Neighbourhood • Hugh Macmillan

... man no bigger than a big forked radish, an' as green as a cabbidge. Me a'nt had one in her house down in Connaught in the ould days. O musha! musha! the ould days, the ould days! Now, you may b'lave me or b'lave me not, but you could have put him in your pocket, and the grass-green head of him wouldn't more than'v stuck out. She kept him in a cupboard, and out of the cupboard he'd pop if it was a crack open, an' ...
— The Blue Lagoon - A Romance • H. de Vere Stacpoole

... by the touch into drunken rage] Lave me be —I'll talk to un-parson or no. I'll tache un to meddle wi' my maid's bird. I'll tache un to kape ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... that was althered for to fit to the place, for it was too big when it came down from Dublin, so they cut off the sides where the sojers was, bekase it stopt out the windows, and wouldn't lave a bit o' light for his riverence to read mass; and sure the sojers were no loss out o' the alther-piece, and was hung up afther in the vesthery, and serve them right, the blackguards. But it was sore agen our will to cut off the ladies at the bottom, that was cryin' and roarin'; but ...
— Handy Andy, Vol. 2 - A Tale of Irish Life • Samuel Lover

... find our old retreat, Yield us to the kissing wave, From the daylight's parching heat In its cool profound to lave. If ye needs must rob for beauty, Earth's abysses teem with booty. Gems, that love the blaze of day:— We are tired of glittering shows, And the strife of man's display; Let us sink to sweet repose Where the lulling water flows; Give us to our ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 20, No. - 581, Saturday, December 15, 1832 • Various

... know, he's only a delicate little man, an' a tailor; an' he wint to work on the moor, an' he couldn't stand it. Sure, it was draggin' the bare life out of him. So, he says to me, one morning, "Catharine," says he, "I'll lave off this a little while, till I see will I be able to get a job o' work at my own trade; an' maybe God will rise up some thin' to put a dud o' clothes on us all, an' help us to pull through till the black time ...
— Home-Life of the Lancashire Factory Folk during the Cotton Famine • Edwin Waugh

... Pomerania. Roystering dogs! Stout hearts! Where are they now, those fine lads in corslet and morgensterne, who played havoc with the casks in the Regenwalde cellar? Some of them died of the pest in Schiefelbein, four of them fell under old Jock Hepburn at Frankfort, the lave went wandering about the world, kissing and drinking, no doubt, and lying and sorrowing and dying, and never again will we foregather in a vacant house in foreign parts! For that is the hardship of life, that it's ever a flux and change. We are here to-day and away to-morrow, and ...
— John Splendid - The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn • Neil Munro

... agin. I had no wish to see her; but, although I knew me father no longer loved me, I had still some natral-like feelin's for him; but, as I had run away from home, I durst not go back, an' so I lift Ireland widout a sight uv him. But I could not lave it foriver, as it might be, widout one more sight uv me mother's grave. I rached the small village where me father lived about nightfall, and lodged in the house uv a kind neighbor who befrinded me, an' he promised, at my earnest wish, to say nothing to any one uv my wish. Early ...
— The Path of Duty, and Other Stories • H. S. Caswell

... the throb and thrill of new life, and experience the swing and sweep of spiritual impulses. He makes them to know that the man who aspires recks not of cold, of storm, or of snow, if only he may reach the summit and lave his soul in the glory that crowns the marriage of earth and sky. They feel that the aspirant is but yielding obedience to the behests of his better self to scale the heights where ...
— The Reconstructed School • Francis B. Pearson

... daisies thick and white, Above her head that wanst lay on my breast, I had no tears, but took the childhers' hands, An' says, "We'll lave the mother to her rest," An' och! the sod was green that summers day; An' rainbows crossed the low hills, blue an' fair; But black an' foul the blighted furrows stretched, An' sent their cruel ...
— Old Spookses' Pass • Isabella Valancy Crawford

... Abbotsford.—Corrected my proofs and the lave of it till about one o'clock. Then started for a walk to Chiefswood, which I will take from station to station,[399] with a book in my pouch. I have begun Lawrie Todd, which ought, considering the author's undisputed ...
— The Journal of Sir Walter Scott - From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford • Walter Scott

... she a beauty!" exclaimed Tim Nolan, who had assisted in carrying the old man, and now stood regarding the girl with an expression of admiration in his countenance. "If she'd be after having me, I'd lave the sarvice and settle ...
— The Three Admirals • W.H.G. Kingston

... "He'll lave it fast enough, if you'll make it worth his while," said the Honourable Laurence Fitzgibbon, who ...
— Phineas Redux • Anthony Trollope

... far from my old northern land, I live where gentle winters pass; Where green seas lave a wealthy strand, And ...
— The Poetical Works of George MacDonald in Two Volumes, Volume I • George MacDonald

... that I found out from a man who run a still, and knew the Red Captain well, that he had made up his mind to lave Galway and come down south, where he had some friends; so I just shut up the house and walked down here. Now you know, your honor, that I don't come here for the sake of the reward. Not a penny of it would I touch if ...
— One of the 28th • G. A. Henty

... of ocean spaces, Of hearts that are wild and brave, Of populous city places, Of desolate shores they lave, Of men who sally in quest of gold To sink ...
— The Spell of the Yukon • Robert Service

... questions surely thou pleasest me," he answered, "but the boiling of the red water ought truly to solve one that thou askest. Lethe thou shalt see, but outside of this ditch, there where souls go to lave themselves when sin repented of is taken away." Then he said, "Now it is time to depart from the wood; take heed that thou come behind me; the margins afford way, for they are not burning, and above them ...
— The Divine Comedy, Volume 1, Hell [The Inferno] • Dante Alighieri

... congregation who looked in reverence on, The elders and the blooming youth, each worshipper was gone; And he, with hairs of winter, whose office 'twas to lave My baby brow, and name my name, ...
— Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, March 1844 - Volume 23, Number 3 • Various

... horses being taken aboard, the bark set sail, and about daybreak next morning she came to anchor at Kirkcaldy. During the voyage, my grandfather, who was of a mild and comely aspect, observed that the knight was more affable towards him than to the lave of the passengers, the most part of whom were coopers going to Dundee to prepare for the summer fishing. Among them was one Patrick Girdwood, the deacon of the craft, a most comical character, so vogie of his ...
— Ringan Gilhaize - or The Covenanters • John Galt

... of to-day is ended. The "punctual sea" has risen, and, waking his dreaming waves, he gives to them their several tasks. Some, with gentle touch, lave the heated rock; these, swift of foot, bring drink to the thirsty sand; those carry refreshing coolness to the tepid pool. Charged with blessings come they all, and, singing 'mid their joyous labor, they join in a chorus of praise to their God and our God; while from each of our hearts goes up ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 2, Issue 11, September, 1858 • Various

... well, but I'd be shamed to show myself to knights and lairds that gate. And see Mary and all the lave have their hands as black ...
— Two Penniless Princesses • Charlotte M. Yonge

... as you know, my house within the city Is richly furnish'd with plate and gold; Basons and ewers, to lave her dainty hands; My hangings all of Tyrian tapestry; In ivory coffers I have stuff'd my crowns; In cyprus chests my arras, counterpoints, Fine linen, Turkey cushions boss'd with pearl, Costly apparel, tents and canopies, Valance of Venice gold, in needlework; ...
— Needlework As Art • Marian Alford

... the practice in Beartown wid some of them as has lots of money to lave the same wid the leddy? Thim chaps are prying round and it would be aisy fur 'em to larn ...
— The Launch Boys' Adventures in Northern Waters • Edward S. Ellis

... say she has more iv it than other childern," Riley explained to Mrs. Gorham; "but th' divvle is in 'em all. Go 'long wid ye'er ride, Missus Gorham, an' lave her ter me. 'Tis th' firm hand I'll be afther showin' her, but th' tinder wan, like I done wid her fa-ather forty year ago. Ye lave ...
— The Lever - A Novel • William Dana Orcutt

... Yale lads celebratin' the goose egg they give to the Hartford College. Noisy; but no harm. We've instructions to lave them be." ...
— The Four Million • O. Henry

... meandering Jacob's grassy meads between, Lo! thy waters, gently wandering, Lave thy ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... heather and dotted with grazing sheep. Jean could hear the tinkle of their bells, the bleating of the lambs, and the comforting maternal answers of the ewes. Above the dark forest which spread itself over the slopes of the foot-hills toward the south and east a lave rock was singing, and she could hear the cry of whaups wheeling and circling over the moors. They were pleasant morning sounds, dear and familiar to Jean's ear, and oh, the sparkle of the dew on the bracken, and the smell of the hawthorn by the garden wall! Jean lifted her pail of ...
— The Scotch Twins • Lucy Fitch Perkins

... speaks sae sweetly Whene'er we meet alane, I wish nae mair to lay my care, I wish nae mair o' a' that's rare: My Peggy speaks sae sweetly, To a' the lave I'm cauld; But she gars a' my spirits glow At wauking ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 2 (of 4) • Various

... round about. reflejar reflect. reflejo m. light, gleam, glimmer. refregar rub. refulgente adj. resplendent, brilliant. regalar make merry, cheer, entertain, delight; —se feast, make merry, fare sumptuously. regar lave, water. regio, -a royal, regal, magnificent. regin f. region, realm. registrar examine, scan. regocijar gladden, brighten. reina f. queen. reinar reign. rer laugh; —se laugh; —-se de laugh at. relmpago m. lightning flash. relinchar whinny, neigh. reloj ...
— El Estudiante de Salamanca and Other Selections • George Tyler Northup

... for you to-morrow.' Then he told Nicht Nought Nothing that there was a loch seven miles long, and seven miles deep, and seven miles broad, and he must drain it the next day, or else he would have him for his supper. Nicht Nought Nothing began early next morning and tried to lave the water with his pail, but the loch was never getting any less, and he did no ken what to do; but the giant's dochter called on all the fish in the sea to come and drink the water, and very soon they drank it dry. ...
— Custom and Myth • Andrew Lang

... her eyes open to the darkness, letting it lave over her as if it were water and she had drowned in it ...
— Star-Dust • Fannie Hurst

... hill Green and of mild declivity, the last, As 't were the cape, of a long ridge of such, Save that there was no sea to lave its base, ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 76, February, 1864 • Various

... John locked the door as fast as he might: "I wish Sir Lave a very good night, I shall sleep ...
— A Bibliography of the writings in Prose and Verse of George Henry Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... though the tale Seems still to bear a part, In every lave of Wharfe's bright wave, The broken ...
— The Adventures of A Brownie - As Told to My Child by Miss Mulock • Miss Mulock

... combin' its auburn hair with a breeze, and scoopin' whiskey down its gullet with its tail fin. No, hold on, Chickie, you wouldn't either. I'm too flat-chisted for a mermaid, and I'd have no time to lave off gurglin' for the hair-combin' act, which, Chickie, to me notion is as issential to a mermaid as the curves. I'd be a sucker, the biggest sucker in the Gar-hole, Chickie bird. I'd be an all-day sucker, ...
— At the Foot of the Rainbow • Gene Stratton-Porter

... the current, between wide meadows, we turned aside into the Assabeth. A more lovely stream than this, for a mile above its junction with the Concord, has never flowed on earth, nowhere, indeed, except to lave the interior regions of a poet's imagination. It is sheltered from the breeze by woods and a hillside; so that elsewhere there might be a hurricane, and here scarcely a ripple across the shaded water. The current lingers along so gently that the mere force of the boatman's will ...
— The Old Manse (From "Mosses From An Old Manse") • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... A woman's voice, thin and weary, came from the ben-end. The long man tiptoed awkwardly to her side. "Canny, lass," he crooned. "It's me back frae the hill. There's a mune and a clear sky, and I'll hae the lave under thack and rape the morn. Syne I'm for Ninemileburn, and the coo 'ill be i' the byre by Setterday. Things micht be waur, and we'll warstle through yet. There was mair tint ...
— The Moon Endureth—Tales and Fancies • John Buchan

... shallow-hearted boys! Ye white-lim'd walls! ye alehouse-painted signs! Coal-black is better than another hue, In that it scorns to bear another hue; For all the water in the ocean Can never turn the swan's black legs to white, Although she lave them hourly in the flood. Tell the empress from me I am of age To keep mine own,—excuse it how ...
— The Tragedy of Titus Andronicus • William Shakespeare [Collins edition]

... lave me alone. It's dead I am, kilt intirely, wid the wakeness. Divil's the bit of wood I've had these two days, and not a cint or a frind to the fore, and I'm jist afther mixin' the male here with wather, thinkin' to ate it that way, but it stuck ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 89, March, 1865 • Various

... not weep, or grieve, or pine. Ich bin dein! Go, lave once more thy restless hands Afar within the azure sea,— Traverse Arabia's scorching sands,— Fly where no thought can follow thee, O'er desert waste and ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... pleughs, and kye.{16} The youngster's artless heart o'erflows wi' joy, But, blate and lathefu', scarce can weel behave; The mother, wi' a woman's wiles, can spy What makes the youth sae bashfu' an' sae grave; Weel pleased to think her bairn's respected like the lave. ...
— Six Centuries of English Poetry - Tennyson to Chaucer • James Baldwin

... shteam gauge whin he shtarted that prolonged blast—an' whin he finished the gauge had dhropped tin pounds! So up I go on the bridge to the ould man, an' says I to him, says I: 'Clear weather or thick fog, I'm tellin' ye to lave that whistle alone if ye expect to finish the voyage. Wan toot out av it means a ton av coal gone to hell an' a dhrop av blood out av the owner's heart! An' from that time on the best I iver hearrd out av that whistle was a ...
— Cappy Ricks • Peter B. Kyne

... his o'er-masted galley check'd his haste. The Centaur and the Dolphin brush the brine With equal oars, advancing in a line; And now the mighty Centaur seems to lead, And now the speedy Dolphin gets ahead; Now board to board the rival vessels row, The billows lave the skies, and ocean groans below. They reach'd the mark. Proud Gyas and his train In triumph rode, the victors of the main; But, steering round, he charg'd his pilot stand More close to shore, and skim along the sand- "Let others bear to sea!" ...
— The Aeneid • Virgil

... after saying it was not a wrinch at firrst, but I considered it best to lave Wall ...
— The Gem Collector • P. G. Wodehouse

... shore Is shaken by the wintry wave— And frequent storms for evermore, (While from the west the loud winds rave, Or from the east, or mountains hoar) The struck and tott'ring sand-bank lave.[1] ...
— The Last Man • Mary Shelley

... is ane, callet Clement's Hob, Fra ilk puir wyfe reifis the wob, And all the lave, Quhatever they haife, The devil recave Thairfoir ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish border (3rd ed) (1 of 3) • Walter Scott

... rigged and fitted out in war style, appropriated to the purpose of teaching pupils, practically, the science of navigation, and the discipline necessary to be observed on board vessels of war. The Americans may not eat their fish with silver forks, nor lave their fingers in the most approved style; yet they are by no means so contemptible a people as some of our small gentry affect to think. They may too, occasionally, be put down in political argument, by the dogmatical method of the quarter-deck; but I must ...
— A Ramble of Six Thousand Miles through the United States of America • S. A. Ferrall

... very welcome," he said. "I heard ye coming down the trail. Four men with a load between them—where are the lave o' ye? The best that's in Hector's ...
— Lorimer of the Northwest • Harold Bindloss

... h'ai vinto: io te perdon. Perdona Tu ancora, al corpo no che nulla pave All'alma si: deh per lei prega; e dona Battesme a me, ch'ogni mia colpa lave; In queste voci languide risuona Un non so che di flebile e soave Ch'al cor gli scende, ed ogni sdegno ammorza, Egli occhi a lagrimar gl'invoglia ...
— Travels in France during the years 1814-1815 • Archibald Alison

... Dand. "Only I think ye're mair like me than the lave of them. Ye've mair of the poetic temper, tho' Guid kens little enough of the poetic taalent. It's an ill gift at the best. Look at yoursel'. At denner you were all sunshine and flowers and laughter, and now you're like the star of ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XIX (of 25) - The Ebb-Tide; Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... ye're too modest, so ye are," said the chief. "But nivir ye moind—lave it all to me. I'll fix ...
— A Castle in Spain - A Novel • James De Mille

... hantle higher nor our lives; and as for hanging, while she is a fixing of the nail and a making of the noose she has time t' alter her mind. But a jump into a canal is no more than into bed; and the water it does all the lave, will ye, nill ye. Why, look at me, the mother o' nine, wasn't I agog to make a hole in ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... of him yet, dear cousin Zoe," Arthur said in a low, moved tone. "I lave found no external injury, and it may be ...
— Elsie's Kith and Kin • Martha Finley

... remote, to British ground Strangers like me came from a foreign strand. I loved at large along the extended sand To roam, and oft beneath the swelling wave, Tho' known so fatal once, my limbs to lave; Or join the children in their summer play, First in their sports, companion of their way. Thus while from many a hand a meal I sought, Winter and age had certain misery brought; But Fortune smiled, a safe and blest abode A new-found master's generous love bestowed, And midst these shades, where ...
— Anecdotes of Dogs • Edward Jesse

... lingering might of chaos. The man face so high above the feet As if lonesome for them like a child. The veins that beat heavily with the music they but half understood Coil languidly around the heart And lave it in the death stream ...
— Precipitations • Evelyn Scott

... child. The two fishes gradually became two well proportioned legs. But though she had now become identified in form with the human race, she retained many of the propensities of that with which she had formerly dwelt. She loved to sport in the cataract, and lave herself in the lakes and rivers. Often would she fly from the company of the Ottawas to that of her old friends, the Spirits of the Flood. How her eyes would glow with childish delight, when the rain dashed from the clouds in torrents, and how mirthful she would be when the spring ...
— Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 3 (of 3) • James Athearn Jones

... Is it me stay here all night? No, your honor: I tether the boat at siven o'hlyock, and lave Brimstone Billy—God forgimme!—to take care ...
— The Miraculous Revenge - Little Blue Book #215 • Bernard Shaw

... 'Ye'd best lave your rifles,' said O'Brien. ''Tis a creeping, crawling job before ye, and the lighter ye go, the better. At close quarters the pistols will do the job better than anything else ye can carry. Now get along wid ye. The sky's lightening over Asia yonder, and 'tis small chance ...
— On Land And Sea At The Dardanelles • Thomas Charles Bridges

... he was only trying one of the Yankee cavalry horses, to see how he liked it." "Here, you murdherin' divil, get down aff that harse," said the Iron Brigade, who had got awake enough to see that the rebel was on his horse. "Take this mule, and lave ...
— How Private George W. Peck Put Down The Rebellion - or, The Funny Experiences of a Raw Recruit - 1887 • George W. Peck

... ladies whose linen we lave, we laundress drudges, could look in here, Wouldn't their feet shrink back with sickness, and wouldn't their faces go pale with fear? White, well-ironed, all sheen and sweetness, that linen looks when it leaves our hands; But they little think of the sodden ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, June 20, 1891 • Various

... ti perdon: perdona Tu ancora: al corpo no, che nulla pave; All'alma si: deh! per lei prega; e dona Battesmo a me ch'ogni mia colpa lave. In queste voci languide risuona Un non so che di flebile e soave Ch'al cor gli serpe, ed ogni sdegno ammorza, E gli occhi a lagrimar gl'invoglia e ...
— Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 - The Catholic Reaction • John Addington Symonds

... as it were surreptitiously, and avoided his children, Mr. Prohack peeped through the half-open door between the conjugal bedroom and the small adjoining room, which should Lave been a dressing-room, but which Mrs. Prohack styled her boudoir. He espied her standing sideways in front of the long mirror, her body prettily curved and her head twisted over her shoulder so that she could see three-quarters of her back in the mirror. An ...
— Mr. Prohack • E. Arnold Bennett

... come before, only the day afther the young lady took me to saw wood for the ould nagur, I got the pleurisy, and didn't lave my bed these five weeks," said the man, lingering ...
— May Brooke • Anna H. Dorsey

... Dermot? because if so ye may go away! Shure, 'tis all the blarney the bhoys does be givin' me is dhrivin' me away from me home. Maybe ye'll get sinse whin I lave ye ...
— The Empire Annual for Girls, 1911 • Various

... he told her mother, And a' the lave o' her kin; But he told na the bonnie may hersel', Till on ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... voice, "Ah, don't 'ee listen to he, maister. 'Twas he that let mun go weeks agone, and there's been nothing but bad work for us all since then. He's so bad as any o' mun; 'twas he that let mun take her Ladyship's childer; and we'm not going to be plagued with witches no more. Lave the witches to us. We knows ...
— The Drummer's Coat • J. W. Fortescue

... what I say—I know it too well! What did I say? Why—why," she added, with an unsettled look, "that I'm promised to another! It is true—true as God's in heaven. Oh, Denis! why did you lave me so' long without seein' me? I said my heart was broke, and you will soon know that it has bitter, bitter rason ...
— Going To Maynooth - Traits And Stories Of The Irish Peasantry, The Works of - William Carleton, Volume Three • William Carleton

... his white flesh with the tongue of our spears! Our women shall pluck out his hair and his manhood! He shall dance to our liking in the midst of the fire! His girl screams for mercy shall lave hungry ears of ——! The son of Banyala! Ough! {HORIZONTAL ...
— Witch-Doctors • Charles Beadle

... th' State, 'measurin' th' vat with gas,—an' I lave it to ye whether this is not th' on'y fair test,—an' supposin' that two feet acrost is akel to tin feet sideways, an' supposin' that a thick green an' hard substance, an' I daresay it wud; an' supposin' you may, takin' ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume V. (of X.) • Various

... &c (water in motion) 348; high water, flood tide. V. be watery &c adj.; reek. add water, water, wet; moisten &c 339; dilute, dip, immerse; merge; immerge, submerge; plunge, souse, duck, drown; soak, steep, macerate, pickle, wash, sprinkle, lave, bathe, affuse^, splash, swash, douse, drench; dabble, slop, slobber, irrigate, inundate, deluge; syringe, inject, gargle. Adj. watery, aqueous, aquatic, hydrous, lymphatic; balneal^, diluent; drenching &c ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... can't lave me house an' naither boite nor sup; turn yer backs an' ye plaze, till Oi get on me skirt.' An' whin Oi wuz up an' dacint an' tould them they could luk, Oi sez, 'It's the foinest Lung balm in the land ye shall taste,' an' the littlest feller he starts a-coughin', oh, a turrible cough—it ...
— Two Little Savages • Ernest Thompson Seton

... festive circle he saw around him upon the inestimable boon of religious liberty which, he might say, was planted upon the rock of Plymouth, and blazed until it had marched all over the land, dispensing from its vivifying wings the healing dew of charity, like the briny tears that lave ...
— Trumps • George William Curtis

... you to the seeds. C'lestin'—an' may Heaven deefin' the walls as I speak his name—has nine an' seventy ways of makin' off with you. Boy, I've known the day in these seas when he'd do it for practice. But he's old now an' tender of hear-rt. He laves it to your good sense to lave him alone. 'Tis well, you trusted no one save old Monkhouse. Adhere to it, lad, or I'll be mournin', one of these gay mornin's, with you gone—an' your name on no passenger list save—what's the name of that ...
— Fate Knocks at the Door - A Novel • Will Levington Comfort

... prince walked on, wise in his thought, to the wall of rock; then sat, and stared at the structure of giants, where arch of stone and steadfast column upheld forever that hall in earth. Yet here must the hand of the henchman peerless lave with water his winsome lord, the king and conqueror covered with blood, with struggle spent, and unspan his helmet. Beowulf spake in spite of his hurt, his mortal wound; full well he knew his portion now was past and gone of earthly ...
— Beowulf • Anonymous

... (rushes to the rescue) O boys, for my sake, an' for the sake o' ye'r wives an' families, have no crossness but lave the ...
— Duty, and other Irish Comedies • Seumas O'Brien

... to withstand, Admits the sea: in at the gaping side The crowding waves gush with impetuous rage Resistless, overwhelming; horrors seize The mariners; Death in their eyes appears, They stare, they lave, they pump, they swear, they pray (Vain efforts!) still the battering waves rush in, Implacable, till, delug'd by the foam, The ship sinks foundering ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... yer accoont at the last, gien ye dinna tak till ye yer pooer an' reign? Ilk man 'at 's in ony sense a king o' men is bun' to reign ower them in that sense. I ken little aboot things mysel', an' I ha'e no feelin's to guide me, but I ha'e a wheen cowmon sense, an' that maun jist stan' for the lave." ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... lave for that? Faix, an' I didn't. Didn't he get me into trouble wid my missus, the haythen! Ye're aware yerself how the boondles comin' in from the grocery often contains more'n'll go into anything dacently. So, ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... seem'd with heart of proof to meet the war; Nor Etna sends abroad the blast of death When, wrapp'd in flames, the giant moves beneath; Nor Scylla, roaring, nor the loud reply Of mad Charybdis, when her waters fly And seem to lave the moon, could match the rage Of those fierce rivals burning to engage. Aloof the many drew with sudden fright, And clamber'd up the hills to see the fight; And when the tempest of the battle grew, Each face display'd a wan and earthy hue. The assailant now prepared his shaft to ...
— The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch • Petrarch

... peaceful flood His home made happy by the bright and good. Gladly he looked upon you; now, apart, He veils his brow and hides his desolate heart; From him life's joys have quickly ebbed away, Leaving the rocks, the sands, and the declining day. To-morrow's tide again the shore will lave, To-morrow's sun will gild the crested wave; New ships will launch and speed across the main, And the wild sea-fowl ply their sport again; But for the broken-hearted there is none To gather back the spoils which Death hath won. None, did ...
— Memoirs of James Robert Hope-Scott, Volume 2 • Robert Ornsby

... stands, whose fretted base The distant cat'ract's murm'ring waters lave, Whilst o'er its mossy roof, with varying grace, The slender branches of the ...
— Poems • Sir John Carr

... whiles, but thou may thieve; What then? poor beastie, thou maun live! A daimen icker in a thrave 'S a sma' request: I'll get a blessin wi' the lave, An' never miss't! ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... "Whistle o'er the lave o't" is mine; the music is said to be by a John Bruce, a celebrated violin player in Dumfries, about the beginning of this century. This I know, Bruce, who was an honest man, though a redwud Highlandman, constantly claimed ...
— The Letters of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... Friday like a little man. I wonder if any one had ever more energy upon so little strength? I know there is a frost; . . . but I mean to break that frost inside two years, and pull off a big success, and Vanity whispers in my ear that I have the strength. If I haven't, whistle owre the lave o't! I can do without glory, and perhaps the time is not far off when I can do without corn. It is a time coming soon enough, anyway; and I have endured some two and forty years without public shame, and had ...
— Robert Louis Stevenson - a Record, an Estimate, and a Memorial • Alexander H. Japp

... you, man. Och! it's a lovely land fer a gravyince, an' I'll niver lave it.' He looked Jim up and down again. 'It's put th' good heart in you, Done.' Jim nodded smilingly. 'D'ye be hearin' iv th' little lady from off the ship?' continued Phil, as if following ...
— In the Roaring Fifties • Edward Dyson

... Likewise junkets an' heavy cake be a responsibility, for if not eaten quick, they perish. But let it be mine to pass my days with a cheek o' pork like the present instance. Ruby, my dear, the young man here wants to lave us." ...
— I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... deepest dells If fairer science ever dwells Beneath the mossy cave; Indulge the verdure of the woods, With azure beauty gild the floods, And flowery carpets lave. ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... av the room, Ma'am," Mike besought Mrs. Porter; "come out av the room an' lave the docthor bring the boss 'round." He signaled to Cynthia with his eyes ...
— Thoroughbreds • W. A. Fraser

... had plunged in belly deep; the mule had lowered its head; the old man was kneeling at the brink. Wayland saw him lave the water up with his hand: then throw it violently back. All at once, the grip of life snapped. Matthews was lying motionless on the sand. The horse was chocking its head up and down; the mule was stamping angrily with fore feet roiling the pool bottom. ...
— The Freebooters of the Wilderness • Agnes C. Laut

... gentle piteous face, provide Promise of help and mercies multiplied, And hope that yet my soul secure may stand. Let not Thy holy eyes be just to see My evil past, Thy chastened ears to hear And stretch the arm of judgment to my crime: Let Thy blood only lave and succour me, Yielding more perfect pardon, better cheer, As older still I grow ...
— Sonnets • Michael Angelo Buonarroti & Tommaso Campanella

... Eden quite behind, and his surprise was the greater when he found that his enemy was offering him his arm, and ended by helping him down the remainder of the way to the river, where the injured lad gladly seated himself at the edge upon a stone, which enabled him to lave both feet at once in the clear cool current, to the great comfort and relief of his ...
— The Black Tor - A Tale of the Reign of James the First • George Manville Fenn

... remembering prayer, Mr Pittle put up a few words for criminals under sentence of death, there being two at the time in the Ayr jail, at the which petition I happened to look at Captain Armour, who, with the lave of the officers, were within the magistrates' loft, and I thought he had, at the moment, a likeness to poor Jeanie Gaisling, that was executed for the murder of ...
— The Provost • John Galt

... holy Moses! we remember it well, bad luck to it; and so does Tom Stewart and Piron there, for it didn't lave a stick of sugar-cane standing from ...
— Captain Brand of the "Centipede" • H. A. (Henry Augustus) Wise

... man; for it can last only until he dies. Death will make all the world theoretically orthodox, and bring them all to one and the same creed. But death will not bring them all to one and the same happy experience of the truth, and lave of the creed. For those who have made preparation for the vision of God and the ocular demonstration of Divine truth, these will rise upon their view with a blessed and glorious light. But for those who have remained sinful and careless, these eternal truths and facts will be a vision of ...
— Sermons to the Natural Man • William G.T. Shedd

... silent dew, Her throbbing brow to lave; And gentle sleep her spirits steep'd, Within ...
— Withered Leaves from Memory's Garland • Abigail Stanley Hanna

... call it Rory's song. Now, mind, I have a verse for everybody— o' the leading lads, I mean; and I shall put 'em in or lave 'em out, according to their inclinations and deserts, wise-a-wee to you, my little frind. So you comprehend it will be Rory's ...
— The Parent's Assistant • Maria Edgeworth

... it, an' the same with the ithers. If 'twas chickun, I'll warrant now—we're all glad to make a bit of chickun go furrther with other things—but a grreat turrkey like this wan—Give it to thim sthrait, Misther Brown, an' that's my advoice. Ye can take it or lave it." ...
— The Brown Study • Grace S. Richmond

... have anything to do with the conspiracy. "Faith, the Major's big enough to choose for himself," Sir Michael said; "he'll ask ye when he wants ye"; or else he would turn the matter off jocularly, declaring that "Dobbin was too young to keep house, and had written home to ask lave of his mamma." Nay, he went farther, and in private communications with his Major would caution and rally him, crying, "Mind your oi, Dob, my boy, them girls is bent on mischief—me Lady has just got a box of ...
— Vanity Fair • William Makepeace Thackeray

... gets thim feel th' way Doherty felt to Clancy whin Clancy med a frindly call an' give Doherty's childher th' measles. We can't sell thim, we can't ate thim, an' we can't throw thim into th' alley whin no wan is lookin'. An' 'twud be a disgrace f'r to lave befure we've pounded these frindless an' ongrateful people into insinsibility. So I suppose, Hinnissy, we'll have to stay an' do th' best we can, an' lave Andhrew Carnegie secede fr'm th' Union. They'se wan consolation; an' that is, if th' American ...
— Mr. Dooley: In the Hearts of His Countrymen • Finley Peter Dunne

... grove, nor harbour fear Where dwell in safety e'en the timid deer. Here shall thine offspring safely see the light, And be partaker of each holy rite. Here, near the hermits' dwellings, shall thou lave Thy limbs in Tonse's sin-destroying wave, And on her isles, by prayer and worship, gain Sweet peace of mind, and rest from care and pain. Each hermit maiden with her sweet soft voice, Shall soothe thy woe, and bid thy heart rejoice: With fruit and early flowers thy lap shall fill, And offer grain ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... be thy waiting-maid, thy weary feet to lave, To scatter perfumes on thy head, and fetch thee garments brave; The other—she the pretty—shall deck her bridal bower, And my field and my city they both shall ...
— Mediaeval Tales • Various

... thine ankle lightly turn'd: With those beauties, scarce discrn'd, Kept with such sweet privacy, That they seldom meet the eye Of the little loves that fly Round about with eager pry. Saving when, with freshening lave, Thou dipp'st them in the taintless wave; Like twin water lillies, born In the coolness of the morn. O, if thou hadst breathed then, Now the Muses had been ten. Couldst thou wish for lineage higher Than twin sister ...
— Poems 1817 • John Keats

... saw ye lave three hours gone, sor, and I c'u'd swear no sowl had intered this house since thin. Pwhat does ut all mane, be all ...
— The Brass Bowl • Louis Joseph Vance

... o' her to her? She pits nae vailue upon her. Eh, man, gin she wad gie her to me, I wad haud her i' the best o' shune a' the lave o' ...
— Robert Falconer • George MacDonald

... stream, the Guadalquivir, Juan to lave his youthful limbs was wont; And having learnt to swim in that sweet river, Had often turn'd the art to some account: A better swimmer you could scarce see ever, He could, perhaps, have pass'd the Hellespont, ...
— Don Juan • Lord Byron

... the shady spring below, With its bulrush brook where the hazels grow; 'Twas there I found the calamus root, And watched the minnows poise and shoot, And heard the robin lave his wing:— But the stranger's bucket is ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For, Book Two • Various

... an' firkins in that sedan-chair. Who ut was, an' what ut was, an' how ut got there, we do not know; but I know in my bones that you an' me an' Jock wid his sprained thumb will get a fortune thereby. Lave me alone, an' ...
— Life's Handicap • Rudyard Kipling

... in mind of a story," came from Shadow. "An old Irishman was dying and wanted to make his will. 'How do ye want to lave yer money, Pat' asked his friend. 'Sure,' says Pat; 'I want to lave it all to me woif an' me four childer, equal loike, so ivery wan ...
— Dave Porter and His Rivals - or, The Chums and Foes of Oak Hall • Edward Stratemeyer

... may cover malice; on their heads the woodmen bring, Meaning all the while to burn them, logs and fagots—oh, my King! And the strong and subtle river, rippling at the cedar's foot, While it seems to lave and kiss it, undermines the ...
— Hindu Literature • Epiphanius Wilson

... the broncho—"Go on without bite or sup, me achin' behind and empty before, and you laggin' in the legs, or stay here for the slice of an hour and get some heart into us? Stay here is it, me boy? then lave go me fut with your teeth and push on to the Prairie Star there." So saying, Sergeant Tom, whose language in soliloquy, or when excited, was more marked by a brogue than at other times, rode away towards ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... sowl! I'd ruther carry the male on my showlders. There's liss of it now; an' maybe I could manage it, iv you'ld only carry the spids, an' thim other things. We moight lave the knapsicks an' kyarthridge-box behind. What use ud they be in Kalifornya? They'll only lade to our detiction ...
— The Wild Huntress - Love in the Wilderness • Mayne Reid

... be Rogers—took my knife away also. "Very well. Now, captin dear, ye may get upon your feet; but—understand me—av ye attimpts to lay hands upon either ov us, the other'll shoot ye through the head widout waitin' to say, 'By your lave.' Arrah, now, it's kilt he is, I do belave!" as the fellow rose from my prostrate body and saw that I made no movement—for all this time he had kept so tight a hold upon my throat that he fairly strangled me, and, though I still, in a dreamy way, heard him speaking, my strength ...
— The Cruise of the "Esmeralda" • Harry Collingwood

... she could do so without detection; inspired the sanitary commission; gathered needed supplies for the grand army; provided nurses for the hospitals; comforted the sick; smoothed the pillows of the dying; inscribed the last messages of lave to those far away; and marked the resting places where the brave men fell. The labor women accomplished, the hardships they endured, the time and strength they sacrificed in the War that summoned three million men to arms, can never be ...
— Eighty Years And More; Reminiscences 1815-1897 • Elizabeth Cady Stanton

... infect even the officers of the Courts and the people who enter the witness-box. It is impossible, for example, not to admire the fine irony of the usher who, when he was told to clear the Court, called out: "All ye blaggards that are not lawyers lave the building." ...
— Law and Laughter • George Alexander Morton

... are," commented Gerald Moore after a preliminary flourish of his bugle. "Ave ye live to be a hundhred and don't lave aff practice 'tis a foine shot ye'll ...
— The Boy Scouts Patrol • Ralph Victor

... mother in her bower, his father in the ha', His brother at the outer yett, but and his sisters twa', And his bonnie cousin Jean, that look'd owre the castle wa', And, mair than a' the lave, loot the tears ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume V. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... Roman Catholics in Ireland appears to lave engaged the attention of Mr. Burke at a very early period of his political life. It was probably soon after the year 1765 that he formed the plan of a work upon that subject, the fragments of which are now given to the public. No title is prefixed to it in the original manuscript; and the Plan, ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VI. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... taking the poi to our mouths. He dipped his forefinger into the poi, and withdrew it covered with the paste, twirled it three times and gave it a fillip, which left no remnant to dangle when the index was neatly cleaned between his lips. Custom was to lave the finger in the fresh-water shell before resuming relations with ...
— Mystic Isles of the South Seas. • Frederick O'Brien

... and sun unwearied glowed; There every star that gems the brow of night— Ple'iads and Hy'ads, and O-ri'on's might; The Bear, that, watchful in his ceaseless roll Around the star whose light illumes the pole, Still eyes Orion, nor e'er stoops to lave His beams ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... aumuses, an' their penances, their whinings, their howlings, their rantings, an' their ravings, here they come at last! Behold the end! Here go the rare and precious wares! A fat professor for a bodle, an' a lean ane for half a merk!' I declare I trembled at the auld hag's ravings, but the lave o' the kimmers applauded the sayings as sacred truths. An' then Lucky went on: 'There are many wolves in sheep's claithing, among us, my man; mony deils aneath the masks o' zealous professors, roaming about in kirks and meetinghouses o' the land. It was but ...
— The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner • James Hogg

... blessed isles, Which, seen from far Colonna's height, Make glad the heart that hails the sight, 10 And lend to loneliness delight. There mildly dimpling, Ocean's cheek Reflects the tints of many a peak Caught by the laughing tides that lave These Edens of the eastern wave: And if at times a transient breeze Break the blue crystal of the seas, Or sweep one blossom from the trees, How welcome is each gentle air That wakes and wafts the odours there! 20 For there the Rose, o'er crag or vale, Sultana of the Nightingale,[56] The maid for ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... hills of Circassia as in all the rest of the world beside. Sunshine and shadow glance athwart its crowning peaks, the waves of the Black Sea lave its shores, its daughters still dream of a home among the Turks, and the secret cargoes are yet run from Anapa up the Golden Horn. The slave bazaar of the Ottoman capital still presents its bevy of fair creatures from the north, and the Sultan's agents are ever on the alert for the most ...
— The Circassian Slave; or, The Sultan's Favorite - A Story of Constantinople and the Caucasus • Lieutenant Maturin Murray

... the powers, Misther Jew Mike," said Pat, placing himself between the Corporal and his gigantic antagonist—"be asy, and lave the owld gintlman alone; he's a brave little man intirely, and it's myself that'll fight for him. Whoop! show me the man that 'od harm my friend, and be the holy poker, and that's a good oath, I'll raise a lump on his head as big as the ...
— Venus in Boston; - A Romance of City Life • George Thompson

... exceedingly enjoyed the cordial encouragement and affection of a number of cultivated and excellent women. Many of his published letters were addressed to one of these, Mrs. Mant. He thus writes to her of another one: "I turn, disgusted and contemptuous, from insipid and shallow folly, to lave in the tide of deeper sentiments. There I swim and dive and rise and gambol, with all that wild delight which could be felt by a fish, after panting out of its element awhile, when flung into its own world of waters by some friendly hand. Such a hand to me ...
— The Friendships of Women • William Rounseville Alger

... longer will the women and children of the tent bring you barley, camel's milk, or dhourra in the hollow of their hands. No longer will you gallop free as the wind across the desert; no longer cleave the waters with your breast, and lave your sides in the pure stream. If I am to be a slave, at least you shall go free. Hasten back to our tent. Tell my wife that Abou el Marek ...
— Stories of Animal Sagacity • W.H.G. Kingston

... bidding, swore To tell thee nought in twelve whole days to come, Or till, enquiry made, thou should'st thyself Learn his departure, lest thou should'st impair Thy lovely features with excess of grief. But lave thyself, and, fresh attired, ascend To thy own chamber, there, with all thy train, To worship Pallas, who shall save, thenceforth, Thy son from death, what ills soe'er he meet. Add not fresh sorrows to the present woes 910 Of the old King, for I believe ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... hae I to interfere? even supposin' I wanted to interfere. But I can lippen weel to my bonny doo; an' for the rest, she maun tak' her chance like the lave o's. An' wha' kens but it micht jist be stan'in' afore Him, i' the very get that He meant to gang. The Lord forgie me for speakin' o' chance, as gin I believed in ony sic havers. There's no fear o' the ...
— David Elginbrod • George MacDonald

... we I-lave repeatedly legislated are being altered from decade to decade, it is evident, under our very eyes, and are likely to change even more rapidly and more radically in the days immediately ahead of us, when peace has returned to the world ...
— State of the Union Addresses of Woodrow Wilson • Woodrow Wilson

... brush wid him, mesilf. Con Murphy takes a hand in this game. We nade no lawyer-body—not yit. Lave it to me, Miss Ruthie, acushla! Sure I'll invite mesilf to supper wid youse, too. I'll come wid Neale, and he shall be prepared beforehand. Be sure he comes here first. Never weep a tear, me dear. ...
— The Corner House Girls at School • Grace Brooks Hill

... my house like this. To think that I should have had ye here all these years, and never known ye to be her child till now, and now to see ye driven away by the divil's own! But if it's the fear of not being able to pay the rint because ye've lost your position, ye needn't lave for many a long day to come. It's Mrs Connor would only be as happy as the queen herself to work her hands to the bone for ye, remembering your darlint of a mother, and not belavin' one word against ...
— An Ambitious Man • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... is not dead," said another kind voice—little Bertha Bryant's mother. "Give him to us and we will wash and lave his wounds and bind them up with healing salves. See how freely they bleed. That could not be the case if ...
— The Red Moccasins - A Story • Morrison Heady

... nothing, but lay quite still. And so, hardly wincing, she let him lave the jagged wound that stretched from her right temple up into the first tendrils of the ...
— The Air Trust • George Allan England

... man would be glad to Lave that in his parLour ratherthan wat he has got now. of corse, you wont be ab?e to apreciate the fulll bauty of the design since i underst and that the retched paper which is going to print this has no redink and no green inq either; so you must Lust immagine that the ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 159, July 28th, 1920 • Various

... is bright—the wave Is a golden and shining track, Softly the waters the white sands lave, And my trusting faith comes back; Oh, all that I ever lost, And all that I long to be, Will be mine when the deep is crossed, And my ship comes home ...
— Poems • Marietta Holley



Words linked to "Lave" :   wash, lap, gargle, freshen up, lavation, lavage, scrub up, rinse, freshen, clean, cleanse, scrub, refreshen



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