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Lamb   Listen
noun
Lamb  n.  
1.
(Zool.) The young of the sheep.
2.
Any person who is as innocent or gentle as a lamb.
3.
A simple, unsophisticated person; in the cant of the Stock Exchange, one who ignorantly speculates and is victimized.
Lamb of God, The Lamb (Script.), the Jesus Christ, in allusion to the paschal lamb. "The twelve apostles of the Lamb." "Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world."
Lamb's lettuce (Bot.), an annual plant with small obovate leaves (Valerianella olitoria), often used as a salad; corn salad. (Written also lamb lettuce)
Lamb's tongue, a carpenter's plane with a deep narrow bit, for making curved grooves.
Lamb's wool.
(a)
The wool of a lamb.
(b)
Ale mixed with the pulp of roasted apples; probably from the resemblance of the pulp of roasted apples to lamb's wool. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Lamb" Quotes from Famous Books



... would have been up before this, but it occurred to him to explore other parts of the cellar, that he might carry away as much booty as possible. He had rendered himself amenable to the law already, and he might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb, so he argued. He was so busily occupied that he did not hear the noise of Robert's entrance into the room above, or he would at once have gone upstairs. In consequence of the delay his uncle and Robert had time to concert ...
— Brave and Bold • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... spoke thus of this venerable Pope: "He was really a lamb, a thoroughly good and upright man, whom I greatly esteem and love, and who, I am sure, does ...
— The Court of the Empress Josephine • Imbert de Saint-Amand

... and put him on the Varsity, and forty-'leven coaches stood over his defenseless form and hammered football into him for eight solid hours on Wednesday and Thursday. And Bi took it all like a little woolly lamb, without a bleat. But it just made you sick to think what was going to happen to Bi when Jordan got to ...
— The New Boy at Hilltop • Ralph Henry Barbour

... as much as taste to do with food; and, unless you call my next stewed monkey dish, deer or lamb, I won't eat ...
— Fil and Filippa - Story of Child Life in the Philippines • John Stuart Thomson

... lamb damage the eagle; but remember the fate of the jackdaw, Mr. Gray-coat! I deserve some ice for my exertions, so come into the hall and get some, and tell me if you have had better ...
— The Trial - or, More Links of the Daisy Chain • Charlotte M. Yonge

... you, dearest father, to pray earnestly that I and you both together may drown ourselves in the Blood of the humble Lamb, which will make us strong and faithful. We shall feel the fire of the divine charity: we shall be co-workers with His grace, and not undoers or spoilers of it. So we shall show that we are faithful to God, and trust in His help, and not in our ...
— Letters of Catherine Benincasa • Catherine Benincasa

... his bold marksmen, rode the eagle-eyed Lescure, And dark Stofflet, who flies to fight as falcon to the lure; And fearless as the lion roused, but gentle as the lamb, Came, marching at his people's head, the brave and good Bonchamps. Charette, where honour was the prize, the hero sure to win; And there, with Henri Quatre's plume, the young Rochejaquelin. And there, in peasant speech and garb—the terror of ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 57, No. 356, June, 1845 • Various

... the new heaven, new earth and new kingdom which cannot be shaken, may remain. In the first of Peter occur these: [10] The Revelation of Jesus Christ, twice or thrice repeated; [11] the blood of Christ as of a Lamb foreordained before the foundation of the world; [12] the spiritual building in heaven, 1 Pet. ii. 5. an inheritance incorruptible and undefiled and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for us, who are kept unto the salvation, ready to be revealed in the last time, 1 Pet. i. 4, 5. ...
— Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St. John • Isaac Newton

... gone on in that self-absorption to the very end. He had got his license to marry, had asked Uncle Billy, who was magistrate as well as miller, to marry them, and, a rough mountaineer himself to the outward eye, he had appeared to lead a child like a lamb to the sacrifice and had found a woman with a mind, heart and purpose of her own. It was all his work. He had sent her away to fit her for his station in life—to make her fit to marry him. She had risen above and now HE WAS ...
— The Trail of the Lonesome Pine • John Fox, Jr.

... head 'mid ignominy, death, and tombs, She her Good Shepherd's hasty image drew— And on his shoulders, not a lamb, a kid. ...
— Poetical Works of Matthew Arnold • Matthew Arnold

... carrion, and he—he Malice I have learned to bear; and I can smile when my fellest enemy drinks to me in my own heart's blood; but when kindred turn traitors, when a father's love becomes a fury's hate; oh, then, let manly resignation give place to raging fire! the gentle lamb become a tiger! and every nerve strain ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... the blame of the Anonymous Friend: who held him in such fascinated thrall that he only looked up once all the morning,—which was when Mr. and Miss March went by. In the afternoon he submitted, lamb-like, to be led down to the beech-wood—that the wonderful talking stream might hold forth to him as it did to me. But it could not—ah, no! it could not. Our lives, though so close, were yet as distinct as the musical ...
— John Halifax, Gentleman • Dinah Maria Mulock Craik

... is terrible; and few folk relish The words of doom which shake his diaphragm; Yet is the heart of him not wholly hellish, But in his playing-hours he's like a lamb; And who'd have said that one so skilled to strafe And, when I err, too truculent by half, Could own so rich, so rollicking a laugh, Would see so well how humorous ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, March 29, 1916 • Various

... found in this Story of the Cotton plant, the author has of necessity had to consult many books. He is especially indebted to Baines' "History of the Cotton Manufacture," French's "Life and Times of Samuel Crompton," Lee's "Vegetable Lamb of Tartary," Report of the U. S. A. Agricultural Department on "The Cotton Plant," and The American Cotton Company's Booklet ...
— The Story of the Cotton Plant • Frederick Wilkinson

... keep the peace &c. (concord) 714. make peace &c. 723. Adj. pacific; peaceable, peaceful; calm, tranquil, untroubled, halcyon; bloodless; neutral. dovish Phr. the storm blown over; the lion lies down with the lamb; "all quiet on the Potomac"; paritur pax bello [Lat][Nepos]; "peace hath her victories no less renowned than war" [Milton]; "they make a desert ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... the Pearl The Frog and the Ox The Wolf and the Lamb Androcles The Dog and the Shadow The Bat, the Birds, and the Beasts The Lion's Share The Hart and the Hunter The Wolf and the Crane The Serpent and the File The Man and the Serpent The Man and the Wood The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse The Dog and the Wolf The Fox and the Crow The Belly and the ...
— Aesop's Fables • Aesop

... aristocracy, so to call it, are performing "Faust," and I go to the rehearsals and there I enjoy the spectacle of a perfect flower-bed of black, red, flaxen, and brown heads; I listen to the singing and I eat. At the house of the principal of the high school I eat tchibureks, and saddle of lamb with boiled grain; in various estimable families I eat green soup; at the confectioner's I eat—in my hotel also. I go to bed at ten and I get up at ten, and after dinner I lie down and rest, and yet I am bored, dear Lika. I am not bored because "my ladies" ...
— Letters of Anton Chekhov • Anton Chekhov

... gentleness and nobility of his soul draws all around him; he inspires them to everything true and beautiful. May be he is the greatest artist now living: you would be astonished if you could see him at his work. Yet he is the most humble and retiring of men." If Overbeck were as a lamb, surely Cornelius was a lion, each indeed supplied what was lacking in the other. Cornelius in after years said to Rudolf Lehmann, "I am the man, he is the woman." And it may strike the mind as a singular coincidence, or rather ...
— Overbeck • J. Beavington Atkinson

... removed to the mountains to return.' The soldiers were employed to till the lands round their posts. Corn had to be imported to Dublin from Wales. So scarce was meat that a widow was obliged to petition the authorities for permission to kill a lamb; and she was 'permitted and lycensed to kill and dresse so much lambe as shall be necessary for her own eating, not exceeding three lambes for this whole year, notwithstanding any declaration of the said Commissioners of Parliament to the ...
— The Land-War In Ireland (1870) - A History For The Times • James Godkin

... denied the self-satisfied Fraser. "There ain't a chance. Why? Because I'm on the level, I am. That's why. But say, getting money from these Reubs is a joke. It's like kicking a lamb in the face." He clinked some gold coins in his pocket and began to whistle noiselessly. "When do we pull out ...
— The Silver Horde • Rex Beach

... the traditional lion, but went out like the orthodox lamb, and the 1st of April was ushered in by most appropriate showers. The time-honoured festival was kept up in rather a languid fashion at Briarcroft. The Upper School discountenanced it as childish and foolish, but ...
— The Leader of the Lower School - A Tale of School Life • Angela Brazil

... king! I bought him because he was so big! Weren't you frightened when you saw such a monster?—and didn't you think he would bite everybody on the least provocation? But he wouldn't, you know! He's a perfect darling—as gentle as a lamb! He would kill anyone that wanted to hurt me—oh, yes of course!—that's why I ...
— God's Good Man • Marie Corelli

... thrusts a card beneath my nose. "Nice leg of lamb, sir?" I waved him off. "Hold a bit!" I cried. "You'll fetch me a capon in white broth as my Lady Monmouth broileth hers. Put plentiful sack in it and boil it until it simpreth!" The waiter scratched his head. "The ...
— There's Pippins And Cheese To Come • Charles S. Brooks

... a lamb would not have given me pause more abruptly. I stole silently up to them. They were fine but somewhat faded garments, modish and even foppish, and, so far as I could distinguish any peculiarity, military in appearance, and evidently belonged to a person of some quality. Nor had they been flung ...
— The Yeoman Adventurer • George W. Gough

... who had the insight and the power to restore Shakespeare in all his fulness to English readers were wholly free from this ignorance—conspicuously Charles Lamb and S.T. Coleridge. Coleridge was indeed the first of Englishmen to think out anything like a complete and satisfactory theory of poetry and the fine arts. The supreme value of his theory comes from the fact that he was one of the few who had actually experienced those creative impulses ...
— Personality in Literature • Rolfe Arnold Scott-James

... thank You for giving me this privilege. I have greeted old friends who have not forgotten me and who all these years have remembered You and Christ, Your only begotten Son. Tonight, O Heavenly Father, I have brought with me to this sacred fold my own one lamb that he might see how sacred and how great is Your power. Look on him tonight, O Supreme Master, and mark him for Your own. And remember, that if the young men in the rear seat plan any disturbance tonight, O Heavenly ...
— Benefits Forgot - A Story of Lincoln and Mother Love • Honore Willsie

... gentlemen!' was his loud-voiced salutation. 'Quite a professional gathering, clergy predominating. Lion and Lamb too, ha! ha! which is the lamb, eh? ha! ha! very good! awfully sorry to hear of your loss, Mrs. Slavin; did our best you know, can't ...
— Black Rock • Ralph Connor

... barley, potatoes, pulses, fruits, vegetables; wool, beef, lamb and mutton, dairy ...
— The 2007 CIA World Factbook • United States

... "Lamb o' Mine", by Dora M. Hepner, is probably the most attractive bit of verse in the magazine. The negro dialect is inimitable, and the consoling spirit of the old black "mammy" fairly radiates from the lines. Metrically, the piece is faultless, and we wish ...
— Writings in the United Amateur, 1915-1922 • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

... For the Lamb, which is in the midst of the throne, shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters; and God shall wipe away all ...
— The Letters of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... innocent as a lamb, and as brave as a lion. She does not care a copper for the looks that are going round ...
— Over the Teacups • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... burden of all his preaching is Christ: "'Behold the Lamb of God, that taketh away the sin of the world!' I present Jesus to you as the atoning Saviour; as God's sacrifice for sin; as that new and living way by which alone a sinful creature can ascend and meet a pure and just God. I bring this ...
— Great Fortunes, and How They Were Made • James D. McCabe, Jr.

... a lamb and a sheep and some little pigs in my basket." And she proceeded to spread them out and divide them; and they continued to chat as they ate ...
— By Berwen Banks • Allen Raine

... began to draw easily off shore—the draught itself being less noticeable than the way in which it smoothed down the heavy sea running. Though the cold did not lift, the weather grew tolerable once more: and each time I crossed the townplace[2] with a lamb in my arms, I heard the surf running lower and lower in the porth ...
— Old Fires and Profitable Ghosts • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... wide crescent; white, the glittering byrnies of the warriors standing in close ranks; white, the fur mantles of the aged men who held the central palace in the circle; white, with the shimmer of silver ornaments and the purity of lamb's-wool, the raiment of a little group of children who stood close by the fire; white, with awe and fear, the faces of all who looked at them; and over all the flickering, dancing radiance of the flames played and ...
— The Blue Flower, and Others • Henry van Dyke

... country of any portion of the hours appointed for my labour, pleading Charles Lamb's humorous excuse, that, if I did come late, I certainly made up for it "by going away early!" On the contrary, my attendance was so uniformly regular, that it attracted the notice of the chief of my room, getting me a ...
— She and I, Volume 2 - A Love Story. A Life History. • John Conroy Hutcheson

... "Go it Uncle Jake!" they shouted. At the end of the first lap, he found himself so far ahead that he threw his old round sailor's cap high into the air and caught it, and he skipped along to the winning-post like a young lamb. A great cheer was echoed from cliff to cliff. Uncle Jake has not spoken his mind all his life for nothing. Seacombe does not unanimously like him, but it has the sense to be rather proud of him. A veterans' race is usually a sad spectacle, a grotesque memento mori: for ...
— A Poor Man's House • Stephen Sydney Reynolds

... old lady was one of those followers of the Lamb who do not wait for Christmas to unlock their sympathies. The river of her love and pity was always overflowing, so that there was no room for increase to a deluge at Christmas time—though she ...
— The Coxswain's Bride - also, Jack Frost and Sons; and, A Double Rescue • R.M. Ballantyne

... to be like the poor lamb that tried to drink at the same stream with the wolf. "You make the water so muddy I can't drink," says the wolf: "I stand below you," replied the lamb, "and therefore it cannot be." "You did me an injury last year," retorted the wolf. ...
— An Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans Called Africans • Lydia Maria Child

... all her coverings; still she lay looking at the stars in that square patch of sky that her shutter opening gave her to see, and thinking of the golden city. "They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat. For the lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes." "There shall be no more curse; but the throne of God and of the Lamb shall ...
— The Carpenter's Daughter • Anna Bartlett Warner

... was put into the wagon at the last minute. "Maybe your stove won't be drawin' just right at the first," said Maggie Corbett, apologetically. As she watched Evelyn's hat of red roses fading in the distance she said softly to herself: "Sure I do hope it's true that He tempers the wind to the shorn lamb, tho' there's some that says that ain't in the Bible at all. But it sounds nice and kind anyway, and yon poor lamb needs all the help He can give her. Him and me, we'll have to do the best we can ...
— The Black Creek Stopping-House • Nellie McClung

... heart, he leaveth some of his prey to other beasts that follow him afar.... And the lion is hunted in this wise: One double cave is made one fast by that other, and in the second cave is set a whiche, that closeth full soon when it is touched: and in the first den and cave is a lamb set, and the lion leapeth therein, when he is an hungered, for to take the lamb. And when he seeth that he may not break out of the den, he is ashamed that he is beguiled, and would enter in to the second den to lurk there, and falleth smell, if the pard gendereth with ...
— Mediaeval Lore from Bartholomew Anglicus • Robert Steele

... he was not mystifying me, I do not know, but Lady Caroline Lamb and others told me that he said the same both before and after he knew me,) was founded upon 'English Bards and Scotch Reviewers.' He told me that he did not care about poetry, (or about mine—at least, any but that poem of mine,) but he was sure, ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. II - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... on which a small ring glistened, sharply against the cream jug. "If I were every body's pet lamb or black sheep, I couldn't have more shepherd's crooks about me. Have you joined the laudable band, Mr. Mann, and am I requested to thank you ...
— Mae Madden • Mary Murdoch Mason

... shan't want to stay so long at any other place." And it bein' past our lunch time we went and had a good meal, and of course Josiah's crossness subsided with every mouthful he took and his liniment looked like a cosset lamb's in amiability when I proposed we should go to the Fishery Buildin', it wuzn't so very fur from there considerin', though as I have said before every place is a good ways off from anywhere else. You'd have knowed the ...
— Samantha at the St. Louis Exposition • Marietta Holley

... him," agreed Anne, looking darkly at the subject of their discussion, who was purring on the hearth rug with an air of lamb-like meekness. "But the question is—how? How can four unprotected females get rid of a cat who ...
— Anne Of The Island • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... Lamb Landor Landshut Lanin, M. Laplace Larkin Latter-Day Pamphlets Law, Carlyle's study of Lawson, Mr., James Carlyle's estimate of Lectures Legendre Leibnitz Leipzig Leith Leslie, Prof. Leuthen Leyden "Liberal Association" Liberalism Liegnitz Literature as ...
— Thomas Carlyle - Biography • John Nichol

... to refuse at their sovereign order to move out of the way for them as they passd the street from the main guard to the custom-house, tho he had then been pushd with a bayonet by one of them, it is sufficient to convince all the world of their lamb-like ...
— The Writings of Samuel Adams, volume II (1770 - 1773) - collected and edited by Harry Alonso Cushing • Samuel Adams

... part in all conventional suppers. Chicken, lobster, crab, duck, tongue, and lamb salad take the place of other meats, although for a large supper there is no objection to serving a meat salad following a hot course. If one can make a good mayonnaise dressing, salads are the easiest of all refreshments, and are most ...
— Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings Together with - Refreshments for all Social Affairs • Mrs. S. T. Rorer

... violently angry, and to pace the library until one o'clock in the morning after my would-be son-in-law had left it! An especially futile proceeding, as Josephine subsequently remarked, inasmuch as, by my own admission, I had behaved like a veritable lamb in his presence and had told him blandly that if he and my daughter were agreed upon the subject I had not a ...
— The Opinions of a Philosopher • Robert Grant

... of Normanby, Lady Caroline Lamb, Countess of Morley, Lady Charlotte Bury, Lady Dacre, ...
— A History of English Prose Fiction • Bayard Tuckerman

... experts at his mighty limbs, as large as tree trunks; at his breast, as large as two shields joined together, and his arms of a Hercules. He was unarmed, and had determined to die as became a follower of the Lamb, peacefully and patiently. Meanwhile he wished to pray once more to the Saviour. So he knelt on the arena, joined his hands and raised his eyes towards the stars. This act displeased the crowd. They had had enough of those Christians, who died like sheep. They understood ...
— Standard Selections • Various

... more easily conceived than described, saw himself obliged to follow this doughty female commander. The gallant trooper was as like a lamb as a drunk corporal of dragoons, about six feet high, with very broad shoulders, and very thin legs, not to mention a great scar across his nose, could well be. Mrs. Nosebag addressed him with something which, if not an oath, sounded very like one, and commanded him ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... The criticism of the great Romantic period of 1798-1830 was done for it by itself, and in some cases by its greatest practitioners, not by its immediate successors. The philosophic as well as poetical intuition of Coleridge; the marvellous if capricious sympathy and the more marvellous phrase of Lamb; the massive and masculine if not always quite trustworthy or well-governed intellect of Hazlitt, had left no likes behind. Two survivors of this great race, Leigh Hunt and De Quincey, were indeed critics, and no inconsiderable ones; but the ...
— Matthew Arnold • George Saintsbury

... which it is the nature of vision to bestow? The human infant arrives, indeed, more slowly at the perfect use of its senses. It arrives, also, more slowly at the perfect use of its limbs. But we never conclude because it does not rise and skip about the fields like a dropped lamb, that there is any essential difference between its muscular powers and those of other animals of creation. Why should we suppose that its vision is regulated by different laws merely because it obtains the perfect use ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 379, May, 1847 • Various

... in the Old Testament foreshadow His work. History, as recorded in the Old Testament, is the preliminary history of the incarnation. The whole sacrificial system of the levitical priesthood told out beforehand, in many ways, what the great redemptive work of the Lamb of God was to be. Each offering and sacrifice revealed the different phases of His work on the cross, as well as His holy and spotless humanity. The sufferings of Christ and their meaning for lost sinners ...
— The Work Of Christ - Past, Present and Future • A. C. Gaebelein

... tenderly upon my breast I bear A lamb or small kid gone astray; And yearly worship with my swains prepare, ...
— The Elegies of Tibullus • Tibullus

... puma, the best bait is a live lamb or a young pig, encaged in a small pen erected at the end of the trap. A fowl is also excellent. When thus baited, the setting of the trap is varied. The upright post at the top of the trap is inserted nearer the front, and ...
— Camp Life in the Woods and the Tricks of Trapping and Trap Making • William Hamilton Gibson

... as if she had said, "My poor dear sacrificial lamb, he wants his little holocaust. There is no help for it. Let me show you the way ...
— The Return of the Prodigal • May Sinclair

... will explain this mystery of a manifold and discordant being, capable at once of the highest virtues and the most frightful crimes? The dog licks his master who strikes him, because the dog's nature is fidelity and this nature never leaves him. The lamb takes refuge in the arms of the shepherd who fleeces and eats him, because the sheep's inseparable characteristics are gentleness and peace. The horse dashes through flame and grape-shot without touching with his swiftly-moving feet the wounded and dead lying in his path, because ...
— The Philosophy of Misery • Joseph-Pierre Proudhon

... "Mrs Peters, will you try the dish next Mr Turnbull? What is it?" (looking at her card)—"Agno roty. Will you, my lord? If your lordship has not yet got into your French— it means roast quarter of lamb." ...
— Jacob Faithful • Captain Frederick Marryat

... A lamb takes the ball of grass from the hand, for it is thus our shepherds sometimes feed them. Poultry are killed by very small quantities of the preparation being mixed with their grain; the fowls sometimes take up ...
— Another World - Fragments from the Star City of Montalluyah • Benjamin Lumley (AKA Hermes)

... escape from the subject during dinner. The Scientist could think and talk of nothing else. He described the merits of deadfalls, snares, steel traps, and birdlime. He asked which they thought would make the best bait, a rabbit, a beefsteak, a live lamb, or carrion. He told them all about the new high-powered, long-range rifle which he had ordered. And he vowed to them all that he would not rest until the bird was either caught or killed "for the ...
— David and the Phoenix • Edward Ormondroyd

... take Marian to see the shops," said the dying mother, in labouring tones. "Mammy going to Jesus. Jesus will take care of mother's little lamb." ...
— The Golden Shoemaker - or 'Cobbler' Horn • J. W. Keyworth

... products: potatoes, citrus, vegetables, barley, grapes, olives, vegetables, poultry, pork, lamb, kids, dairy ...
— The 2004 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... putting on a look of innocent slyness, like a lamb engaged in intrigue, "had I known that you might feel Mr. Gwynn's going away, I would have kept him ...
— The President - A novel • Alfred Henry Lewis

... much of the lamb to that rush," observed the third man; "they sound to me more like ...
— The Rainy Day Railroad War • Holman Day

... do nothing like a lamb," I contradicted him. "I should never have forgiven you for sending me away from—the car. Besides, Lady Turnour wants to teuf-teuf up to the chateau in her sixty-horse-power Aigle, and make an ...
— The Motor Maid • Alice Muriel Williamson and Charles Norris Williamson

... all attention," said Rosamond, and like a lamb before its slaughterer she knelt before the woman, bending low her graceful head ...
— Rosamond - or, The Youthful Error • Mary J. Holmes

... fell in with our neighbors the Lefevres at a waxwork stall, and while Madeleine and I were admiring some fruit that exactly imitated nature, little Jules Lefevre stretched out his hand to touch a little waxen boy with a lamb, saying, "Pretty, pretty!" ...
— Jacques Bonneval • Anne Manning

... single particular which I am about to mention. In the year 1829, M. Cousin was developing at the Sorbonne the meaning of these verses of La Fontaine, which introduce the fable of the Wolf and the Lamb: ...
— The Heavenly Father - Lectures on Modern Atheism • Ernest Naville

... approval of ages emit the odor of sanctity, and whoever scoffs does so at his peril. Charles Lamb was once criticised for speaking disrespectfully of the equator, and a noted divine was severely taken to task for making unkind remarks about hell. Humanity insists that these time honored institutions be treated ...
— The Head Voice and Other Problems - Practical Talks on Singing • D. A. Clippinger

... to convey any reflection upon human learning, but to exhibit the contemptuous spirit of learned men, so generally manifested to the illiterate, but really learned followers of the Lamb. They sometimes meet their match, even in worldly wit. Thus, when three learned gentlemen from Oxford overtook a pious waggoner, they ironically saluted him as Father Abraham, Father Isaac, and Father Jacob; he replied, Gentlemen, you are mistaken: I am neither ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... of the literary as distinguished from the originating intellect. His method is almost perfect, but it is devoid of personality. He says countless things which are the very echo of Sir Walter's epistolary manner. He says things like Lamb, and sometimes they are as good as the original could have made them. He says things like ...
— My Contemporaries In Fiction • David Christie Murray

... other! Greenhill, who laid his axe under his head, to guard against surprise, first slept! Pearce was now alone, and destitute; but at length he came to a fire of the natives, and obtained some fragments of the opossum: at last he reached a flock of sheep, and seized on a lamb, which he proceeded to devour undressed. He was discovered by a stock-keeper, and when he surrendered was received with great kindness and sympathy. His host introduced him to the bushrangers then abroad; but being afterwards captured, he was again forwarded ...
— The History of Tasmania , Volume II (of 2) • John West

... consists of an invective against the evils of superstition, followed by a chorus of priests that does nothing to dispel [v.04 p.0644] the impression of scepticism contained in the first part. He tells us himself that the tragedies were not intended for the stage. Charles Lamb says they should rather be called political treatises. Of Brooke Lamb says, "He is nine parts Machiavel and Tacitus, for one of Sophocles and Seneca.... Whether we look into his plays or his most passionate love-poems, we shall find all frozen and made rigid with intellect." He goes on to speak ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 - "Brescia" to "Bulgaria" • Various

... and therefore, by a neglect of manifest duty, became accomplices in the guilt: that the fining of communities for their neglect in punishing offences committed within their limits was justified by several examples. In King Charles the Second's time, the city of London was fined when Dr. Lamb was killed by unknown persons. The city of Edinburgh was fined and otherwise punished for the affair of Captain Porteous. A part of the revenue of the town of Glasgow had been sequestered until satisfaction was made for the pulling ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 1 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Egerton Ryerson

... and William Hazlitt were book-collectors of a type which deserves a niche to itself. Writing to Coleridge in 1797, Lamb says: 'I have had thoughts of turning Quaker, and have been reading, or am, rather, just beginning to read, a most capital book, good thoughts in good language, William Penn's "No Cross, no Crown." ...
— The Book-Hunter in London - Historical and Other Studies of Collectors and Collecting • William Roberts

... Sir, let me add; if I have dealt artfully with you, impute it to my fear of offending you, through the nature of my petition, and not to design; and that I took the example of the prophet, to King David, in the parable of the Ewe-Lamb." ...
— Pamela (Vol. II.) • Samuel Richardson

... sparkling water that trickle from every lump of ice or snow, as though all the ice and snow on earth, and all the hardness of heart, all the heresy and schism, all the works of the devil, had yielded to the force of love and to the fresh warmth of innocent, lamb-like, confiding virtue. In such a world there should be no guile—but there is a great deal of it notwithstanding. Indeed, at no other season is there so much. This is the moment when the two whited sepulchres at either end of the Avenue reek with the thick atmosphere ...
— Democracy An American Novel • Henry Adams

... above the river there was passing one upon whom the gaze of the fishermen by the river immediately kindled, and he lifted his hand and said, "He is the one who is to teach you now. You must go after him. Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world." Great and mysterious words, that filled in that which men had believed in all the records they had read and the thinking they had done before! And they turned away from John and went after this new teacher ...
— Addresses • Phillips Brooks

... his meditation by the glare of light, starting up, cast his eyes upon Mercy, the stout serving maiden, and bearer of that same precious porcelain—for which my dear mother's reverence was as great, every whit, as that of Charles Lamb's for old China; and how the next moment the waiter was in the hands of my six feet seven and a-half cousin, with "Du let me help you, young woman!" and how the next instant the six feet seven and a-half formed a horizontal line with the floor, instead of a perpendicular ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII No. 6 June 1848 • Various

... of a night—er—mare." The Senator's face was flushed and his strong voice husky. "You mistake; this is luncheon, not breakfast Keep me company? No?" Foster pecked viciously at his lamb chop. "I've no appetite at all. Caught a beastly cold at the Sisters in Unity meeting last night. Cough ...
— I Spy • Natalie Sumner Lincoln

... British journalist, was born about 1785. Educated at Christ's Hospital and Pembroke College, Cambridge, he came to London and soon joined the famous literary circle of which Hunt, Lamb and Hazlitt were prominent members. Upon the retirement of Dr Stoddart in 1817 he was appointed editor of The Times, a position which he held until his death, when he was succeeded by Delane. Lord ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 - "Banks" to "Bassoon" • Various

... was fairly awake, her love for her friends came back again, and her good humor with it. She made Fly bleat like a lamb and spin like a top, ...
— Little Folks Astray • Sophia May (Rebecca Sophia Clarke)

... seeing he was never christened, and knows nothing at all of the bearings and distances of religion. His lawful name is S'ip, or Shipio Africa, taken, as I suppose, from the circumstance that he was first shipp'd from that quarter of the world. But, as respects names, the fellow is as meek as a lamb; you may call him any thing, provided you don't call him ...
— The Red Rover • James Fenimore Cooper

... this country let them get too old. He was willing to pay a great price for ducklings always; but even Mr. Brown seems to think it is a great wrong not to let them grow until Thanksgiving time, and makes a great many apologies every year. It is from his farm that we always get the best lamb too; they are very nice people, the Browns, but the poor old man seems very feeble this summer. Some day I should really like to take a drive out into the country to see them, you know so well how to manage a horse. You can spare a day or two to give time for ...
— A Country Doctor and Selected Stories and Sketches • Sarah Orne Jewett

... his like, and every man loveth his neighbour. All flesh consorteth according to kind, and a man will cleave to his like. What fellowship shall the wolf have with the lamb? so is the sinner unto the godly. What peace is there between the hyena and the dog? and what peace between the rich man and the poor? Wild asses are the prey of lions in the wilderness; so poor men are pasture for the rich. Lowliness is an abomination to a proud man; so a poor man is ...
— Select Masterpieces of Biblical Literature • Various

... sacrifice to Bonsa when he reach Yarleys, get lamb in back kitchen at night, or if ghost come any more, calf in wood outside. Not steal it, pay for it himself. Then think Jeekie turn Cath'lic; confess his sins, they say them priest chaps not split, and after they got his sins, they ...
— The Yellow God - An Idol of Africa • H. Rider Haggard

... "how could he be angered against thee, my pet lamb? But come quickly, dear, to thy robing room; what dress wilt put on to greet ...
— "Unto Caesar" • Baroness Emmuska Orczy

... came to us, took us aside, and asked us what we were doing in Gobstown. We had no case to make. We offered to bring forward our good landlord as a shining example, to lead our lamb forward in order that he might show up the man-eaters on the other estates. The organisers were all hostile. They would not allow us into the processions any more. If we could bring forward some sort of roaring black devil we would be more than welcome. ...
— Waysiders • Seumas O'Kelly

... barren cliffs the ravenous vulture dwells, Who never fattens on the prey which from afar he smells; But, patient, watching hour on hour upon a lofty rock, He singles out some truant lamb, a victim, from ...
— The Universal Reciter - 81 Choice Pieces of Rare Poetical Gems • Various

... out one pound thirteen and fourpence, master. You said if I only kept Browney out of mischief, the rest would do no harm. There she is as harmless as a lamb. Are you ...
— Celtic Fairy Tales • Joseph Jacobs (coll. & ed.)

... Like Mary's lamb, it followed Dan about whenever the opportunity offered, until "Crippy" - which was the name Dan had given it - was known in the village quite as ...
— A District Messenger Boy and a Necktie Party • James Otis

... this down as if it were merely a choice between mutton and lamb chops for dinner. But Jean Marot walked ...
— Mlle. Fouchette - A Novel of French Life • Charles Theodore Murray

... sacrifice, allowing our goodly meats and fishes to lie fallow! 'Chance,' it is said by an ingenious historian, who, having been long a secretary in the East India House, must certainly have had access to the best information upon Eastern matters—'Chance,' it is said by Mr. Charles Lamb, 'which burnt down a Chinaman's house, with a litter of sucking-pigs that were unable to escape from the interior, discovered to the world the excellence of roast-pig.' Gunpowder, we know, was invented by a similar fortuity." [The reader will observe ...
— The Fitz-Boodle Papers • William Makepeace Thackeray

... thirst went to a brook to drink. Putting his nose to the water, he was interested to feel it bitten by a fish. Not liking fish, he drew back and sought another place; but his persecutor getting there before him administered the same rebuff. The lamb being rather persevering, and the fish having no appointments for that day, this was repeated a few thousand times, when the former felt justified ...
— Cobwebs From an Empty Skull • Ambrose Bierce (AKA: Dod Grile)

... with his stripes we are healed. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the Lord hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he opened not his mouth. He was taken from prison and from judgment; and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression ...
— Evidences of Christianity • William Paley

... its peculiar perfume blandly soft. At times we near'd the wild-duck and her brood In the far angle of some dim-seen pool, Silent and sable, underneath the boughs Of low hung willow; and, at times, the bleat Of a stray lamb would bid us raise our eyes To where it stood above us on the rock, Knee-deep amid the broom—a sportive elf. Enshrined in recollection—sleep those hours So brilliant and so beautiful—the scene So full of pastoral loveliness—the heart With pleasure ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 58, Number 360, October 1845 • Various

... its course, And drank it dry a lamb, Had they but sought it at its source; But now it rushes on with force And leaps the ...
— Gleams of Sunshine - Optimistic Poems • Joseph Horatio Chant

... at that, then," she decided. "After all, you know, I am not coming exactly like a lamb to the slaughter. There are a few things you'd like to get to know from me about Jocelyn Thew, but there are also a few things I should like to worm out of you. We'll see which wins. And, ...
— The Box with Broken Seals • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... Flo was nowhere to be seen. Mrs. Tobin busied herself about the stove, while the captain washed himself at the sink. He was hungry, for not even his wife's anger could take away his hearty appetite. Some cold lamb on the table appealed to him, and he was about to sit down and help himself when the kitchen door was suddenly opened and Flo burst into the room. She was greatly excited, and was about to announce some startling bit of news when her mother checked her. She thrust her hand into a pocket in ...
— Jess of the Rebel Trail • H. A. Cody

... Press would make him a paschal lamb!" cried Monsieur de Granville; "and the Opposition would enjoy white-washing him, for he is a fanatical Corsican, full of his native notions, and his murders were a Vendetta. In that island you may kill your enemy, and think yourself, and be ...
— Scenes from a Courtesan's Life • Honore de Balzac

... wives, and children; yet when thou didst espy from thy roof the wife of a poor man, sin betook thee, and thou hast taken the wife of Uriah, and himself hast thou slain by the sword of the Ammonites. Thou, a rich man, hast taken his last lamb from the poor man, and hast slain the owner himself. The ...
— Lectures on Russian Literature - Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenef, Tolstoy • Ivan Panin

... suspected of having dealings with Lambe on his own account; for Arthur Wilson says, in his Life of James I.:[72] "Dr. Lamb, a man of an infamous Conversation, (having been arraigned for a Witch, and found guilty of it at Worcester; and arraigned for a Rape, and found guilty of it at the King's Bench-Bar at Westminster; yet ...
— The Curious Case of Lady Purbeck - A Scandal of the XVIIth Century • Thomas Longueville

... he seized the puppet by the collar and carried him to his house as if he had been a young lamb. ...
— Pinocchio - The Tale of a Puppet • C. Collodi

... the Badia, they saw a procession coming up the side of the hill. The wind blew on the candles borne in gilded wooden candlesticks. The girls of the societies, dressed in white and blue, carried painted banners. Then came a little St. John, blond, curly-haired, nude, under a lamb's fleece which showed his arms and shoulders; and a St. Mary Magdalene, seven years old, crowned only with her waving golden hair. The people of Fiesole followed. Countess Martin recognized Choulette among them. With a candle in one ...
— The Red Lily, Complete • Anatole France

... threshold, nightgowned to its feet, and looking up with a frightened, wistful face. "Why, Benny!" She stoops down and catches the child in her arms, and presses him tight to her neck, and bends over, covering his head with kisses. "What in the world are you doing here, you poor little lamb? Is mother's darling walking in his sleep? What did you want, my pet? Tell mudda, do! Whisper it in mudda's big ear! Can't you tell mudda? What? Whisper a little louder, love! We're not angry with you, sweetness. Now, try to speak louder. Is that Santa Claus? No, dearest, that's just ...
— The Daughter of the Storage - And Other Things in Prose and Verse • William Dean Howells

... head stuck halfway out, and he probably wondered where he was. It was so dark that there was little danger of anyone discovering him. A dog in a motion-picture house is about as popular, you know, as Mary's lamb was in school. That is, ...
— Brother and Sister • Josephine Lawrence

... reverently from the shelf covered with blue paper, on which she laid it after each service; and having placed it on the sideboard, she cautiously removed the fine cloths which protected its embroidery. A golden lamb slumbered on a golden cross, surrounded by broad rays of gold. The gold tissue, frayed at the folds, broke out in little slender tufts; the embossed ornaments were getting tarnished and worn. There was perpetual anxiety, fluttering concern, at seeing ...
— Abbe Mouret's Transgression - La Faute De L'abbe Mouret • Emile Zola

... is written (John 1:29): "Behold the Lamb of God, behold Him Who taketh away the sin of the world": and the reason for the employment of the singular is that the "sin of the world" is original sin, as ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae) - From the Complete American Edition • Saint Thomas Aquinas

... appearance in nature corresponds to some state of the mind, and that state of the mind can only be described by presenting that natural appearance as its picture. An enraged man is a lion, a cunning man is a fox, a firm man is a rock, a learned man is a torch. A lamb is innocence; a snake is subtle spite; flowers express to us the delicate affections. Light and darkness are our familiar expression for knowledge and ignorance; and heat for love. Visible distance behind and before us, is respectively our image of ...
— Nature • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive the things that God hath prepared. They shall hunger no more nor thirst any more, neither shall the sun light on them nor any burning heat, for the Lamb which is in the midst of the Throne shall shepherd them and lead them to eternal fountains of waters, and God shall wipe away every tear from their eyes. There shall be no more death—no mourning nor crying nor pain any more, for the former things—the ...
— The Gospel of the Hereafter • J. Paterson-Smyth



Words linked to "Lamb" :   give birth, teg, lamb roast, bear, domestic sheep, lamb chop, saddle of lamb, lamb curry, Paschal Lamb, Scythian lamb, lamb's-quarters, lamb succory, Charles Lamb, Ovis aries, victim, lambkin, Ovis, lamb's-quarter, lamb-chop, hog, deliver, baa-lamb, Persian lamb, Elia, meat, hogget, have, innocent, leg of lamb, dear, dupe, rack of lamb, hogg, roast lamb, loin of lamb, litterateur, young mammal, breast of lamb, lamb's lettuce, genus Ovis, inexperienced person



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