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Head   Listen
noun
Head  n.  
1.
The anterior or superior part of an animal, containing the brain, or chief ganglia of the nervous system, the mouth, and in the higher animals, the chief sensory organs; poll; cephalon.
2.
The uppermost, foremost, or most important part of an inanimate object; such a part as may be considered to resemble the head of an animal; often, also, the larger, thicker, or heavier part or extremity, in distinction from the smaller or thinner part, or from the point or edge; as, the head of a cane, a nail, a spear, an ax, a mast, a sail, a ship; that which covers and closes the top or the end of a hollow vessel; as, the head of a cask or a steam boiler.
3.
The place where the head should go; as, the head of a bed, of a grave, etc.; the head of a carriage, that is, the hood which covers the head.
4.
The most prominent or important member of any organized body; the chief; the leader; as, the head of a college, a school, a church, a state, and the like. "Their princes and heads." "The heads of the chief sects of philosophy." "Your head I him appoint."
5.
The place or honor, or of command; the most important or foremost position; the front; as, the head of the table; the head of a column of soldiers. "An army of fourscore thousand troops, with the duke of Marlborough at the head of them."
6.
Each one among many; an individual; often used in a plural sense; as, a thousand head of cattle. "It there be six millions of people, there are about four acres for every head."
7.
The seat of the intellect; the brain; the understanding; the mental faculties; as, a good head, that is, a good mind; it never entered his head, it did not occur to him; of his own head, of his own thought or will. "Men who had lost both head and heart."
8.
The source, fountain, spring, or beginning, as of a stream or river; as, the head of the Nile; hence, the altitude of the source, or the height of the surface, as of water, above a given place, as above an orifice at which it issues, and the pressure resulting from the height or from motion; sometimes also, the quantity in reserve; as, a mill or reservoir has a good head of water, or ten feet head; also, that part of a gulf or bay most remote from the outlet or the sea.
9.
A headland; a promontory; as, Gay Head.
10.
A separate part, or topic, of a discourse; a theme to be expanded; a subdivision; as, the heads of a sermon.
11.
Culminating point or crisis; hence, strength; force; height. "Ere foul sin, gathering head, shall break into corruption." "The indisposition which has long hung upon me, is at last grown to such a head, that it must quickly make an end of me or of itself."
12.
Power; armed force. "My lord, my lord, the French have gathered head."
13.
A headdress; a covering of the head; as, a laced head; a head of hair.
14.
An ear of wheat, barley, or of one of the other small cereals.
15.
(Bot.)
(a)
A dense cluster of flowers, as in clover, daisies, thistles; a capitulum.
(b)
A dense, compact mass of leaves, as in a cabbage or a lettuce plant.
16.
The antlers of a deer.
17.
A rounded mass of foam which rises on a pot of beer or other effervescing liquor.
18.
pl. Tiles laid at the eaves of a house. Note: Head is often used adjectively or in self-explaining combinations; as, head gear or headgear, head rest. Cf. Head, a.
A buck of the first head, a male fallow deer in its fifth year, when it attains its complete set of antlers.
By the head. (Naut.) See under By.
Elevator head, Feed head, etc. See under Elevator, Feed, etc.
From head to foot, through the whole length of a man; completely; throughout. "Arm me, audacity, from head to foot."
Head and ears, with the whole person; deeply; completely; as, he was head and ears in debt or in trouble. (Colloq.)
Head fast. (Naut.) See 5th Fast.
Head kidney (Anat.), the most anterior of the three pairs of embryonic renal organs developed in most vertebrates; the pronephros.
Head money, a capitation tax; a poll tax.
Head pence, a poll tax. (Obs.)
Head sea, a sea that meets the head of a vessel or rolls against her course.
Head and shoulders.
(a)
By force; violently; as, to drag one, head and shoulders. "They bring in every figure of speech, head and shoulders."
(b)
By the height of the head and shoulders; hence, by a great degree or space; by far; much; as, he is head and shoulders above them.
Heads or tails or Head or tail, this side or that side; this thing or that; a phrase used in throwing a coin to decide a choice, question, or stake, head being the side of the coin bearing the effigy or principal figure (or, in case there is no head or face on either side, that side which has the date on it), and tail the other side.
Neither head nor tail, neither beginning nor end; neither this thing nor that; nothing distinct or definite; a phrase used in speaking of what is indefinite or confused; as, they made neither head nor tail of the matter. (Colloq.)
Head wind, a wind that blows in a direction opposite the vessel's course.
off the top of my head, from quick recollection, or as an approximation; without research or calculation; a phrase used when giving quick and approximate answers to questions, to indicate that a response is not necessarily accurate.
Out of one's own head, according to one's own idea; without advice or coöperation of another.
Over the head of, beyond the comprehension of.
to go over the head of (a person), to appeal to a person superior to (a person) in line of command.
To be out of one's head, to be temporarily insane.
To come or draw to a head. See under Come, Draw.
To give (one) the head, or To give head, to let go, or to give up, control; to free from restraint; to give license. "He gave his able horse the head." "He has so long given his unruly passions their head."
To his head, before his face. "An uncivil answer from a son to a father, from an obliged person to a benefactor, is a greater indecency than if an enemy should storm his house or revile him to his head."
To lay heads together, to consult; to conspire.
To lose one's head, to lose presence of mind.
To make head, or To make head against, to resist with success; to advance.
To show one's head, to appear.
To turn head, to turn the face or front. "The ravishers turn head, the fight renews."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Head" Quotes from Famous Books



... going to Paris. Monsieur le Comte Real, the head of our branch of the police, will decide what is to ...
— Angelot - A Story of the First Empire • Eleanor Price

... a crisp wind. Not content with blowing, as it had done before, Helen's hair about her ears, it also whipped her skirts urgently about her. Smith calculated this wind, and shook his head dubiously. ...
— White Ashes • Sidney R. Kennedy and Alden C. Noble

... designed various forms of heaters and tried them, but have finally decided on the one shown in the engraving, Fig. 3, which consists of a lap welded tube, 13 inches internal diameter, 12 feet long, with a cast-iron head which is divided into two compartments or chambers by a diaphragm. Into this head are screwed 60 tubes, one inch outside diameter and 12 feet long, which are of seamless brass. These are the heating tubes, ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 363, December 16, 1882 • Various

... news respecting the position of affairs in Paris, wishing to know, in particular, if the National Defence ministers were still prisoners of the populace, and whether there was now a Red Republic with Blanqui at its head. What astounded them most was to hear that, although Paris was taking more and more to horseflesh, it was, as yet, by no means starving, and that, so far as famine might be concerned, it would be able to continue resisting for some months longer. In point of ...
— My Days of Adventure - The Fall of France, 1870-71 • Ernest Alfred Vizetelly

... Nine years afterwards head money was awarded to the whole fleet, of which only the vessels directed by Lord Cochrane and a few sent afterwards, when too late for effective measures, took part in the action. The alleged reason of ...
— The Life of Thomas, Lord Cochrane, Tenth Earl of Dundonald, G.C.B., Admiral of the Red, Rear-Admiral of the Fleet, Etc., Etc. • Thomas Cochrane, Earl of Dundonald

... you for the same offence. It shan't occur again. I am rather over-particular, no doubt, in my desire for complete isolation, but I have good reasons for insisting on the point. Rightly or wrongly, I have got it into my head that some day there might be an organised raid upon my grounds. If anything of the sort should occur I suppose I might reckon ...
— The Mystery of Cloomber • Arthur Conan Doyle

... Skibbereen. The case having been reported to me, as a member of the Relief Committee, I procured the attendance of Dr. Dore, and proceeded to the house where the body lay. The scene which presented itself will never be forgotten by me. The body was resting on a basket which had been turned up; the head reclined on an old chair; the legs were on the ground. All was wretchedness around. The wife, miserable and emaciated, was unable to move, and four children, more like spectres than living beings, were lying near the fire place, in which, ...
— The History of the Great Irish Famine of 1847 (3rd ed.) (1902) - With Notices Of Earlier Irish Famines • John O'Rourke

... when she went to say good-by to her husband he welcomed her with a smile, and with something of his old, courteous manner put out his hand to greet her. She took it between her own, and raising it to her lips, knelt beside him, and laying her head against his ...
— Bessie's Fortune - A Novel • Mary J. Holmes

... reputation to such an extent that the convent became overcrowded with the number of those whom he had attracted thither. He was therefore appointed, after three years' residence at Citeaux, to head a colony of monks which was to be fixed in the valley of Clairvaux—a desolate though beautiful spot in the bishopric of Langres. The tears of their brethren accompanied the departure of Bernard and the twelve others who composed the band. It was in the year 1115, and ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 5 of 8 • Various

... us the name of her dance, anyway," said a tall, soldierly gray-head that was feeling something for the first time in twenty years. "Do hurry! She's going ...
— Through stained glass • George Agnew Chamberlain

... write!" she exclaimed, brimming up suddenly with the pleasure she had but half stopped to realize. "I thought I could. But I know very well that the best and brightest things I've ever thought have come into my head over the ironing-board or the bread-making. Even at home. And here,—why, Mrs. Scherman, it's living in a poem here! And if you can be in the very foundation part of such living, you're in the realest place of all, I think. I don't believe poetry can be skimmed off ...
— The Other Girls • Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney

... thought I'd go to New York city, and take a little voyage on the salt water. I had about a hundred dollars I earned after the old man died; but a fellow in the city got it all away from me;" and Harvey hung his head, as though this was not a ...
— The Coming Wave - The Hidden Treasure of High Rock • Oliver Optic

... with the journal of Bernard himself that the story opens, September 187-. Bernard-Maurice Hugon de Montauret, Vicomte de Vaudricourt, is on a visit to his uncle, the head of his family, at La Saviniere, a country-house somewhere between Normandy and Brittany. This uncle, an artificial old Parisian in manner, but honest in purpose, a good talker, and full of real affection for his heir Bernard, is one of M. Feuillet's good minor characters—one of the quietly ...
— Appreciations, with an Essay on Style • Walter Horatio Pater

... came to the store, but passed him without the slightest notice. He hoped she had not seen him, and, as she passed out, so placed himself that she must see him, and secured for his pains only a slight, cold inclination of the head. ...
— Barriers Burned Away • E. P. Roe

... later official goddesses, each insisting on her own department of poetry, are too clearly representative of the all-appropriating pretensions of literature in modern seats of learning. They remind me of the enumeration of studies which a dear old head of an Oxford college innocently regarded as complete and reasonable when he assured me that all branches of knowledge were fairly and equally represented on the college staff. "We have," he said, "a lecturer on Greek ...
— More Science From an Easy Chair • Sir E. Ray (Edwin Ray) Lankester

... by two or three big mine owners who were trying to "freeze out" the other settlers, so as they might get the place to themselves and "boom it." Brown, who had the big house over the hill, was the head devil of the gang! Wells felt his indignation kindle anew. And this girl that he had ousted was Brown's friend. Was it possible that she was a party to Brown's designs to get this three acres with the other lands? ...
— Openings in the Old Trail • Bret Harte

... man smiled and shook his head. "You are scarcely likely to encounter me, monsieur," he answered. "I shall be busy amongst the poor and sick, or at work within the monastery. I shall remember you—but I do not think that we shall ...
— Under False Pretences - A Novel • Adeline Sergeant

... the rapid, light footsteps, and turned his head. At all times slow of thought and slower of speech, he was galvanized into a sudden rigidity that differed only in degree from the symptoms displayed by his chief officer. Certainly he could not have been more stupefied had he ...
— The Stowaway Girl • Louis Tracy

... replied Robert, "and again I wish to make my apologies for deserting, but the temptations of New York are very strong, sir. The city went to my head." ...
— The Shadow of the North - A Story of Old New York and a Lost Campaign • Joseph A. Altsheler

... shout went up as it was seen that the ball had taken the leg bail. Doe looked flurried at this sudden dismissal and a bit upset. He involuntarily shot a glance at Freedham and after some hesitation left the crease. He rather dragged his bat and drooped his head as he walked to the pavilion, till, realising that this might be construed into an ungracious acceptance of defeat, he brought his head erect and swung his bat ...
— Tell England - A Study in a Generation • Ernest Raymond

... replied Agnes solemnly, who paused, and then abruptly added, 'My head burns, I believe I am not well. O! could I strike from my memory all former scenes—the figures, that rise up, like furies, to torment me!—I see them, when I sleep, and, when I am awake, they are still before my eyes! ...
— The Mysteries of Udolpho • Ann Radcliffe

... gangway that connected her with the shore, carrying bales of provisions, barrels of water, kegs of gunpowder, and other necessaries for the voyage, and even as Asad and his followers reached the head of that gangway, four negroes were staggering down it under the load of a huge palmetto bale that was slung from ...
— The Sea-Hawk • Raphael Sabatini

... thoroughly uncomfortable, were it not that you have forgotten all about your thumbs, and you have allowed your reins to slip away from you, so that he is going where he pleases, except when you jerk him sharply to the right, and then he shakes and tosses his head and goes on contentedly, as one saying, "All things have an end, ...
— In the Riding-School; Chats With Esmeralda • Theo. Stephenson Browne

... looked out upon a spacious, beautifully kept garden. On one wall hung a large crucifix, the cross made of ebony while the exquisitely carved figure of the crucified Christ was of ivory, fastened to the cross with golden nails, while the crown of thorns which encircled the drooping head was also made of gold. Two large pictures, one of which represented the Descent from the Cross, and the other the Entombment, hung on either side of the crucifix; and the opposite wall was occupied by a very large and beautiful painting depicting ...
— The Cruise of the Nonsuch Buccaneer • Harry Collingwood

... wished to know surely whether the mason had gone off on his spree or had really turned back as she thought he had the night before. And there he was on the job, sure enough! Upon her approach, he looked up and rumpled his hat over his head, which was his shamefaced method of saluting a lady. He still looked somewhat stormy, but there were no traces of debauch in his eyes, and he was tossing in his mortar with a fine swing, and handling the heavy stones as if they were loaves ...
— Clark's Field • Robert Herrick

... official career M. Seneschal had never been so terribly shocked. He lost his head, just as he did on that unlucky day, when, all of a sudden, nine hundred militia-men fell upon him, and asked to be fed and lodged. Without his wife's help he would never have been able to dress himself. Still he was ready ...
— Within an Inch of His Life • Emile Gaboriau

... have an extraordinary head of hair. The hair, though not very long, is very bushy, so that it takes the capillary artist no less than a day to succeed in reducing this forest into a small bulk. As it requires some force to draw the comb through the hair, the operation is painful, and this is ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 664, September 22,1888 • Various

... living down the street, who was known always to carry a sum of money in her dress pocket, the banks being untrustworthy. Mrs. Reardon, passing along in the dusk of the early morning, had been hit on the head with a blackjack. The one ...
— Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise • David Graham Phillips

... more nor less than the organization of a second pack-outfit and the crossing of the Cascade Mountains on horseback by a virgin route. The Head, Bob, and Joe had many discussions about it. I do not recall that my advice was ever asked. It is generally taken for granted in these wilderness-trips of ours that I will be there, ready to get a story ...
— Tenting To-night - A Chronicle of Sport and Adventure in Glacier Park and the - Cascade Mountains • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... And No. 1 of his folding series appeared before him: Tartarin captured, extradited... Of course he was frightened, but his attitude was heroic. Quickly detaching himself from Sonia: "Fly, save yourself!" he said to her in a smothered voice. Then he mounted the stairs as if to the scaffold, his head high, his eyes proud, but so disturbed in mind that he was forced ...
— Tartarin On The Alps • Alphonse Daudet

... the princess did on entering the palace was to send for the head cook and to order the repast for the Sultan When she had finished she suddenly added, "Besides the dishes I have mentioned there is one that you must prepare expressly for the Sultan, and that no one must touch but yourself. It consists of a stuffed cucumber, and the ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments • Andrew Lang.

... walked round in solemn majesty, its flat head kept low to the ground, its sinuous body curving and winding as it walked, like that of ...
— "Unto Caesar" • Baroness Emmuska Orczy

... or the part of the body to which they are applied. Among others, we have Cold, Cool, Temperate, Tepid, Warm, Hot, Hot Air, Russian, Turkish, Vapor, Electric, Sea, Shower, Sponge, Douche, Foot, Sitz, Head, Medicated, Alkaline, Acid, Iodine, and Sulphur Baths. Temperature influences the properties of any bath; thus the sponge, sitz, and alkaline baths may be employed warm or cold, according to ...
— The People's Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English • R. V. Pierce

... little man, with small, clearly chiselled features, a large head, and a remarkably high, square forehead. There was a peculiarly high and regular arch in the wrinkles of his brow, which was also slightly contracted. The lines of his countenance fell naturally into an expression of mild suffering, of endurance sweetened by benevolence, or, according ...
— De Quincey's Revolt of the Tartars • Thomas De Quincey

... noble lady, hastening near. Stayed him that would have fallen, with quick arms; And, sitting on the earth, laid her lord's head Tenderly in her lap. So bent she, mute, Fanning his face, and thinking 't was the day— The hour—which Narad named—the sure fixed date Of dreadful end—when, lo! before her rose A shade majestic. Red his garments ...
— National Epics • Kate Milner Rabb

... directly in the line of travel of the whalers in Hudson Bay, all of whom pass directly along its rocky coast, it is an almost unknown territory. It is known to be inhabited, but its people are seldom seen. The head of the island is far from Iwillik, and the frozen straits that separate the two countries would afford an admirable route of communication. The island is said to be well stocked with game and the inhabitants are comparatively ...
— Schwatka's Search • William H. Gilder

... particular act, the treaty addresses itself to the political, not the judicial department; and the legislature must execute the contract, before it can become a rule for the Court."[153] To the same effect, but more accurate, is Justice Miller's language for the Court a half century later, in Head Money Cases: "A treaty is primarily a compact between independent nations. It depends for the enforcement of its provisions on the interest and the honor of the governments which are parties to it. * * * But a treaty may also contain provisions which confer certain rights upon the citizens ...
— The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation • Edward Corwin

... Martlow, "I know you've got it writ up in there——" he jerked his head towards the hall—"that I'm the chief glory of Calderside, but damme if you're not the second best yourself, and I'll condescend to shake your hand if it's only to show you I'm not ...
— The Best British Short Stories of 1922 • Edward J. O'Brien and John Cournos, editors

... sensation, for he was buried at the public expense. Polybius, an author by no means to be despised, asserts that this king was led in the triumph. Quintus Terentius Culleo followed Scipio in his triumph with a cap of liberty on his head, and during the remainder of his life treated him with the respect due to him as the author of his freedom. I have not been able to ascertain whether the partiality of the soldiers or the favour of the people fixed upon him the surname of Africanus, or whether in the same manner as Felix was applied ...
— History of Rome, Vol III • Titus Livius

... to Anna's room. But Babi dogged him. As a rule she used to finish her work early: but that night she seemed never to have done with scrubbing her kitchen: and when Christophe thought he was rid of her, she took it into her head to tidy a cupboard in the passage leading to Anna's room. Christophe found her standing on a stool, and he saw that she had no intention of moving all evening. He felt a furious desire to knock her over with her piles of plates: but he restrained himself and asked her to go and see how her mistress ...
— Jean-Christophe Journey's End • Romain Rolland

... head with such flattery if you aren't careful," he said with a slight flush. "Please talk of something sensible now, for an antidote—your ...
— The Iron Trail • Rex Beach

... of the Fronde, embody the enlarged views of the true historian, and breathe the impetuous spirit of a man whose native element is civil commotion, and who looks on the chieftainship of a party as worthy to engage the best powers of his head and heart; but his style abounds with negligences and irregularities which would have shocked the litterateurs ...
— Handbook of Universal Literature - From The Best and Latest Authorities • Anne C. Lynch Botta

... worried, for he feared that Silence would break his agreement not to tell about the bet. He frowned and shook his head a bit, ...
— Frank Merriwell's Son - A Chip Off the Old Block • Burt L. Standish

... ha! what a pretty boy! Papa's delight, and mamma's joy! Wouldn't he like to go to bed, And have a cabbage-leaf on his head? ...
— Bitter-Sweet • J. G. Holland

... besides slavery, it has abolished jury trial. The decision of Justice Hunt was most iniquitous. He had as much right to order me hung to the nearest tree, as to take the case from the jury and render the decision he did," and he bowed his head with shame at this prostitution ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... I turned away from the river, and back to the trampled ground of our recent conflict. There, with no other witness save the moon, I clad myself in the Marquis's doublet of black velvet; I set his mask of silk upon my face, his golden wig upon my head, and over that his sable hat with its drooping feather. Next I buckled on his sword belt, wherefrom hung his rapier that I ...
— The Suitors of Yvonne • Raphael Sabatini

... domestic troubles, but stern in his resolve and vigorous in his intellect, was driven by his loneliness to adapt himself to the new conditions. He applied his unabated energies to building up a new fortune. His decision, his force, and his ability soon placed him at the head of one of the earliest new enterprises in the State—a broken-down railway—which he re-organized and brought to a full ...
— The Christmas Peace - 1908 • Thomas Nelson Page

... high with his thoughts, or to express them without help, and then took a piece of coal out of the fire where he sat, and began to write upon the floor. He first drew a circle, a little oval, to which he made four paws or feet, a head and a tail. "This," said he, "is a tortoise, lying in the water around it," and he moved his hand round the figure, continuing, "This was or is all water, and so at first was the world or the earth, when the tortoise gradually raised ...
— Journal of Jasper Danckaerts, 1679-1680 • Jasper Danckaerts

... at the wistful eyes of the father, as Mr. Page stood by the head of the cot, resting one hand on his supposed ...
— The High School Boys in Summer Camp • H. Irving Hancock

... Tallahala and Bayou Pierre behind us. At Baker's Creek it had a bloody all-day fight, in which we took part after having been driven in upon the brigade. It was there that at dusk, to the uproarious delight of half the big camp, and with our Captain once more at our head, for he had rejoined us that very morning, we came last off the field, singing "Ned Ferry's a-comin' ...
— The Cavalier • George Washington Cable

... a glimpse of his assailant at the river. The blow upon the head of Alice and thrust following were in quick succession, but he received an impression as to their enemy's identity. He had seen the same heavily whiskered face on the trip from Northfield to London, and in Hyde Park. Had not he observed that listening attitude, ...
— Oswald Langdon - or, Pierre and Paul Lanier. A Romance of 1894-1898 • Carson Jay Lee

... divell att the places aforesaid, calling him, sometimes, her protector, and, other sometimes, her blessed saviour.—She saw Forster, Dryden, and Thompson, and the rest, and theire protector, which they call'd their god, sitting at the head of the table.—When this informer used meanes to avoyd theire company, they threatned her, if she would not turne to theire god, the last shift should be the worst.'[37] At Crighton, 1678, the Devil himself preached to the witches, 'and most blasphemously mocked them, if they offered ...
— The Witch-cult in Western Europe - A Study in Anthropology • Margaret Alice Murray

... very erect and alert. A dapper, dignified step. Movement precise. An effect of a good deal of nose glasses. Black, heavy rims. A wide, black tape. Head perpendicular, drawn back against the neck. Grave, scholarly face, chiselled with much refinement of technique; foil to the studious complexion, a dark, silken moustache. Holding our thumb-nail sketch up to the light, ...
— Walking-Stick Papers • Robert Cortes Holliday

... set spurs to our horses, hastened after the troop, and joined them. The chief greeted me by passing his hand over his forehead towards his breast; and, as a sign of his good will, offered me his arms, a club with an iron head, covered with a number of spikes. Only a sheikh is allowed ...
— A Woman's Journey Round the World • Ida Pfeiffer

... deceased met death from prolonged immersion and exhaustion in the sea eight miles south-southeast of Old Head of Kinsale, Friday, May 7, 1915, owing to the sinking of the Lusitania by torpedoes fired by ...
— History of the World War - An Authentic Narrative of the World's Greatest War • Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish

... the young Places seems to have been simply to make them keep out of their father's way, which was no doubt what he desired, as far as he desired anything at all. Francis records the habit without bitterness, having reason to thank his stars that his father respected the inside of his head whilst cuffing the outside of it; and this made it easy for Francis to do yeoman's service to his country as that rare and admirable thing, a Freethinker: the only sort of thinker, I may remark, whose thoughts, and consequently whose ...
— A Treatise on Parents and Children • George Bernard Shaw

... this book is a proposal about entering all the seamen in England into the king's pay—a subject which deserves to be enlarged into a book itself; and I have a little volume of calculations and particulars by me on that head, but I thought them too long to publish. In short, I am persuaded, was that method proposed to those gentlemen to whom such things belong, the greatest sum of money might be raised by it, with the least injury to those ...
— An Essay Upon Projects • Daniel Defoe

... the boy, hurried back to execute the orders he had received, the lieutenant and his young companion following at a slower pace. The fast increasing darkness had now completely shut out the brig from sight. When last perceived, however, her head was pointed in a direction which, could she maintain, she might weather the rocks under her lee. Presently the loud report of a gun was heard sounding high above the roar of the seas ...
— Ned Garth - Made Prisoner in Africa. A Tale of the Slave Trade • W. H. G. Kingston

... kept your eye on the ball because you think you have. It is wonderful how easy it is to keep your eye glued—so to speak—to the ball until the very half-second when that duty is most important and then to lift the head, spoiling the shot. If you can persuade yourself to look at the ball all through the stroke, and to look at the spot where the ball was even after the ball is away, you will find that you not only hit the ball satisfactorily but that it flies straighter ...
— The Empire Annual for Girls, 1911 • Various

... his head at the latter proposal. "We will aid you as far as we can with our small party," he answered; "but my people would never consent to shut themselves up within walls. They do not understand that sort of fighting. Trust to Winnemak; he will do all he ...
— In the Rocky Mountains - A Tale of Adventure • W. H. G. Kingston

... exhibition was unexpectedly successful. There was not a dead- head around the lake. Paul took for his share two hundred and thirty dollars, beside spending one of the pleasantest days he remembers. This town is now a smart city and Paul withholds the name because the citizens may not relish ...
— The Story of Paul Boyton - Voyages on All the Great Rivers of the World • Paul Boyton

... his head, he saw, on the walls of the chamber, paintings which represented lively and domestic scenes. They were of very old work, and marvellously lifelike. There were cooks who blew the fire, with their cheeks all puffed out; others plucked geese, or cooked ...
— Thais • Anatole France

... opens, and Europe is disclosed as a prone and emaciated figure, the Alps shaping like a backbone, and the branching mountain-chains like ribs, the peninsular plateau of Spain forming a head. Broad and lengthy lowlands stretch from the north of France across Russia like a grey-green garment hemmed by the Ural mountains and ...
— The Dynasts - An Epic-Drama Of The War With Napoleon, In Three Parts, - Nineteen Acts, And One Hundred And Thirty Scenes • Thomas Hardy

... melted. Not even a heart of stone could withstand the solvent power of such love. Her head dropped upon ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... a glimpse of his situation from his own point of view, are given in a letter to the New York Nation from Dennett, a special correspondent (see page 320). Dennett writes that, among the Northern soldiers and traders in the hotel at Hilton Head, there was also "a person who had the easily distinguishable appearance and manners of a South Carolinian. This gentleman, a person of some fifty odd years old, dressed tolerably well in a suit of grey clothes, with a large display of crumpled linen at the collar ...
— Letters from Port Royal - Written at the Time of the Civil War (1862-1868) • Various

... said Miss Kilburn; and she put her head quite out of the carriage, and stared at the ...
— Annie Kilburn - A Novel • W. D. Howells

... the colonel the helm, I lashed the end of the gaff to the boom, and then loosed enough of the mainsail to goose-wing it, or make a leg-of-mutton sail of it. Then watching for a lull or a smooth time, I told him to put the helm a-starboard and let her come to on the port tack, head to the southward, and at the same time I hoisted the sail. She came by the wind quickly without shipping a drop of water, but as I was securing the halyards the colonel gave her too much helm, bringing ...
— Famous Adventures And Prison Escapes of the Civil War • Various

... First, that the Arminian faction (of which Sir John Van Olden Barnavelt, late Advocate of Holland and West Frizeland and Councellor of State, was without contradiction the head) had resolved and agreed to renounce and break the generallity and unitie ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. II • Various

... arbour, warm, and promising much refreshing to the Pilgrims; for it was finely wrought above the head, beautified with greens, furnished with benches and settles.[297] It also had in it a soft couch, whereon the weary might lean. This, you must think, all things considered, was tempting; for the Pilgrims already began to be foiled with the badness of the ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... sign it Philkins. You're only the nurse—I'm the head of the house when the family's away, and my name's ...
— The Magic City • Edith Nesbit

... exclaimed Betty, above the noise. She shifted the wheel to bring the boat head-on to the waves, and this made her ride on a more even keel. Then, with a downpour, accompanied by terrific thunder and vivid lightning, the storm broke. Betty bravely stood to her post, the others offering to ...
— The Outdoor Girls at Rainbow Lake • Laura Lee Hope

... the great, black rock. The fishes climbed to the top Then, one after another, they followed the leader, each gliding head foremost down the rock. It was ...
— Story Hour Readers Book Three • Ida Coe and Alice J. Christie

... his part, took no notice whatever of his guard, but stood perfectly still and looked with calm, lofty indifference over his head— which he was well able to do, being a considerably ...
— The Walrus Hunters - A Romance of the Realms of Ice • R.M. Ballantyne

... intermit) the cure of the disease itself. Is it not so in states too? Sometimes the insolency of those that are great puts the people into commotions; the great disease, and the greatest danger to the head, is the insolency of the great ones; and yet they execute martial law, they come to present executions upon the people, whose commotion was indeed but a symptom, but an accident of the main disease; but this symptom, grown so violent, would allow no time for a consultation. ...
— Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions - Together with Death's Duel • John Donne

... Mr. Hodden. Thank you. Now, if you venture to address me again during this voyage, I shall be obliged if you keep a civil tongue in your head." ...
— One Day's Courtship - The Heralds Of Fame • Robert Barr

... interval its performances were chiefly experimental, and the variety of silver and copper coins, now so much sought after by collectors, were struck. The most noted of these is the "Washington cent," so called because it bore the head of Washington on one side. It was a long time before Congress decided upon a proper device for the coins, and the debates that occurred upon the subject were interesting and ...
— Washington and the American Republic, Vol. 3. • Benson J. Lossing

... Cubit and a half high. They have very long hair, reaching down to their Knees and lower; and a Beard larger than any Man's. After their Beards are grown long, they wear no Cloaths, but the Hair of their Head falls behind a great deal below their Hams; and that of their Beards before comes down to their Feet: then laying their Hair thick all about their Body, they afterwards gird themselves, making use of their Hair for Cloaths. ...
— A Philological Essay Concerning the Pygmies of the Ancients • Edward Tyson

... hand, had out of my own head begun the Tracts; and these, as representing the antagonist principle of personality, were looked upon by Mr. Palmer's friends with considerable alarm. The great point at the time with these good men in ...
— Apologia pro Vita Sua • John Henry Newman

... this man's personality had gathered the agony and horror of war, so now about his head glowed and gleamed in imagination ...
— The Clansman - An Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan • Thomas Dixon

... expression, 'full of impure dialectic'; or the lively images under which the argument is described,—'the flood of arguments pouring in,' the fresh discussions 'bursting in like a band of revellers.' (2) As illustrations of the second head, may be cited the remark of Socrates, that 'distinctions of words, although sometimes pedantic, are also necessary'; or the fine touch in the character of the lawyer, that 'dangers came upon him when the tenderness of youth was unequal ...
— Theaetetus • Plato

... them; and that on this account they had put to death more than thirty thousand Chinese in Luzon! The king did as I asked him and therefore punished the said Yanglion by ordering him to be killed, and the said Tiognen, by commanding his head to be cut off and suspended in a cage. The Chinese who were put to death in Luzon were innocent, and I with others discussed this matter with the king, that we might learn what was his will in this grave affair. There was also another matter of importance to be considered, which was that ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, - Volume XIII., 1604-1605 • Ed. by Blair and Robertson

... Jean Buche with his pipe, and as we were on guard, Zebede went about nine o'clock to relieve the sentinels at the head of the picket. I stepped a little out of the circle and stretched myself in a furrow a few steps in the rear with my knapsack under my head. The weather was warm, and we heard the crickets long after the sun went down. A few stars ...
— Waterloo - A sequel to The Conscript of 1813 • Emile Erckmann

... to Bohemia, and he reigned for thirty-six years, so his country, although rich, yet peopled by a canny and thrifty population, must have been thankful when at last he was knocked on the head at Crecy. The story is well known to us all, so we need not linger on it. John bequeathed his motto to the Black Prince, who could well afford to pay a graceful compliment by accepting it; after all, not he, but Bohemia, had to pay for ...
— From a Terrace in Prague • Lieut.-Col. B. Granville Baker

... that awful buzzing or whizzing, and then something seems to strike you in the face and head. I noticed that at first the boys threw their hands to their heads every time a shell went over; but they soon came so fast and so close that it was a ...
— The Boys of '98 • James Otis

... Himavat always dwelleth Maheswara endued with the effulgence of the fire that blazeth up at the end of the Yuga. As Purusha, he sporteth here with Prakriti (the universal mother). Except by Nara and Narayana, he is incapable of being seen by the diverse classes of Munis, the gods with Vasava at their head, the Gandharvas, the Yakshas, and the Siddhas. Though invested with Maya, him the eternal Vishnu alone, of a thousand heads and thousand legs, can behold. It was in this region that Chandramas (the moon) was installed into the ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... stood on the brink of a wall, over which the stream at our side fell in a "hank" of divided cataracts. Our road was engineered with great difficulty to the bottom of the steep, whence a gentler descent took us to the hamlet of Vasenden, at the head of the lake. Beyond this there was no road for carrioles, and we accordingly gave ours in charge of a bright, active and intelligent little postmaster, twelve years old. He and his mother then rowed ...
— Northern Travel - Summer and Winter Pictures of Sweden, Denmark and Lapland • Bayard Taylor

... sobbing. She lifted her head, and by a sudden impulse threw out the passion of her heart with all her concentrated strength of mind towards the man she loved, murmuring as she did so some passionate, despairing words ...
— Beatrice • H. Rider Haggard

... own conversion is an instance of the kind of testimony which then worked the strongest conviction. St. Paul, a fiery fanatic on a mission of persecution, with the midday Syrian sun streaming down upon his head, was struck to the ground, and saw in a vision our Lord in the air. If such a thing were to occur at the present day, and if a modern physician were consulted about it, he would say without hesitation, that it was an effect of an ...
— Froude's Essays in Literature and History - With Introduction by Hilaire Belloc • James Froude

... and philosophy. The study of Roman literature, then, needs no plea to recommend it. It is ours by intellectual descent; our bridge to all antiquity and to those Grecian stores of art and thought which are the fountain head of existing culture. ...
— Writings in the United Amateur, 1915-1922 • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

... man among new things are we who now hold at arm's-length the rebel newspaper of the day. The very figure-head, for the thousandth time, elicits it groan of spiteful lamentation. Where are the united heart and crown, the loyal emblem, that used to hallow the sheet on which it was impressed, in our younger days? In its stead we find a continental officer, with the Declaration of Independence in one ...
— Old News - (From: "The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales") • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... judicial thought, in regard to contracts in restraint of trade, has been especially marked. The ancient doctrine upon that head has been weakened and modified to such a degree that but little if any of it is left. Indeed, excessive competition may sometimes result in actual injury to the public; and anti-competitive contracts, to avert personal ruin, may be perfectly reasonable. It is only when such contracts are publicly ...
— Monopolies and the People • Charles Whiting Baker

... more in attendance upon them than as actively pursuing them, for the females seemed themselves almost as active agents in the sport of being wooed as were their lovers in wooing them. The male bird first dipped down his head till his beak just touched the water, then raised it again in a constrained and tense manner,—the curious rigid action so frequent in the nuptial antics of birds,—at the same time uttering his strange haunting note. The air became filled with it; ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 3 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... in a desperate position. The corners of her lips twitched down. Dr. Ballard thought he saw his advantage, and leaned his fine head toward her. She impulsively threw her arms around ...
— Jewel - A Chapter In Her Life • Clara Louise Burnham

... in this despair, he suddenly beheld a stranger, standing near the door. Midas bent down his head, without speaking; for he recognized the same figure which had appeared to him the day before in the treasure-room, and had bestowed on him this unlucky power of the Golden Touch. The stranger's countenance still wore a smile, which Seemed to shed a yellow luster all about the room, and ...
— The Elson Readers, Book 5 • William H. Elson and Christine M. Keck

... buildings generally show the semi-circular arch on the doorways, but the windows usually have a triangular head; at Sompting church, however, the windows have the semi-circular arch. It is necessary to say a few words in detail about the more ...
— Our Homeland Churches and How to Study Them • Sidney Heath

... on a low chair by the table, and, leaning her head on the arm of the sofa, wept bitterly. In the drawing-room there was only one candle burning in the candelabra, and the chair where she was sitting was in darkness; but I saw how her head and shoulders were quivering, and how her hair, escaping from her combs, covered her neck, ...
— The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... and laying her hand upon her uncle's arm, said an earnest word in his ear, in obedience to which he bundled out his daughters, as they hung back politely, closed the door upon the last skirt, and reconducted the Countess to the head of the table, scratching his chin in some perplexity, but ready to humour ...
— The Light of Scarthey • Egerton Castle

... course it would be in her power to rig out her sweeps to increase her speed; but I considered that, with the breeze that was then blowing, they would be practically useless except when going directly head to wind; and what I had to do was so to manoeuvre the schooner as to cut off her escape in that direction. What I was chiefly afraid of was that the consorts of the galley—for I was confident that she had consorts somewhere ...
— The Log of a Privateersman • Harry Collingwood

... through the Clearing Hospitals for classification and diagnosis and dressings, but it is of a sketchy character, as you may imagine. They are all swarming with J.J.'s, even the officers. One of the officers is wounded in the head, shoulder, stomach, both arms, and both feet. A boy in my wards, with a baby face, showed me a beautiful silver, enamelled and engraved watch he got off a "Yewlan"; he was treasuring it in his belt "to take home to Mother." I asked him if the Yewlan was dead. "Oh yes," ...
— Diary of a Nursing Sister on the Western Front, 1914-1915 • Anonymous



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