Online dictionaryOnline dictionary
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Give   Listen
verb
Give  v. t.  (past gave; past part. given; pres. part. giving)  
1.
To bestow without receiving a return; to confer without compensation; to impart, as a possession; to grant, as authority or permission; to yield up or allow. "For generous lords had rather give than pay."
2.
To yield possesion of; to deliver over, as property, in exchange for something; to pay; as, we give the value of what we buy. "What shall a man give in exchange for his soul?"
3.
To yield; to furnish; to produce; to emit; as, flint and steel give sparks.
4.
To communicate or announce, as advice, tidings, etc.; to pronounce; to render or utter, as an opinion, a judgment, a sentence, a shout, etc.
5.
To grant power or license to; to permit; to allow; to license; to commission. "It is given me once again to behold my friend." "Then give thy friend to shed the sacred wine."
6.
To exhibit as a product or result; to produce; to show; as, the number of men, divided by the number of ships, gives four hundred to each ship.
7.
To devote; to apply; used reflexively, to devote or apply one's self; as, the soldiers give themselves to plunder; also in this sense used very frequently in the past participle; as, the people are given to luxury and pleasure; the youth is given to study.
8.
(Logic & Math.) To set forth as a known quantity or a known relation, or as a premise from which to reason; used principally in the passive form given.
9.
To allow or admit by way of supposition. "I give not heaven for lost."
10.
To attribute; to assign; to adjudge. "I don't wonder at people's giving him to me as a lover."
11.
To excite or cause to exist, as a sensation; as, to give offense; to give pleasure or pain.
12.
To pledge; as, to give one's word.
13.
To cause; to make; with the infinitive; as, to give one to understand, to know, etc. "But there the duke was given to understand That in a gondola were seen together Lorenzo and his amorous Jessica."
14.
To afford a view of; as, his window gave the park.
To give away, to make over to another; to transfer. "Whatsoever we employ in charitable uses during our lives, is given away from ourselves."
To give back, to return; to restore.
To give the bag, to cheat. (Obs.) "I fear our ears have given us the bag."
To give birth to.
(a)
To bear or bring forth, as a child.
(b)
To originate; to give existence to, as an enterprise, idea.
To give chase, to pursue.
To give ear to. See under Ear.
To give forth, to give out; to publish; to tell.
To give ground. See under Ground, n.
To give the hand, to pledge friendship or faith.
To give the hand of, to espouse; to bestow in marriage.
To give the head. See under Head, n.
To give in.
(a)
To abate; to deduct.
(b)
To declare; to make known; to announce; to tender; as, to give in one's adhesion to a party.
To give the lie to (a person), to tell (him) that he lies.
To give line. See under Line.
To give off, to emit, as steam, vapor, odor, etc.
To give one's self away, to make an inconsiderate surrender of one's cause, an unintentional disclosure of one's purposes, or the like. (Colloq.)
To give out.
(a)
To utter publicly; to report; to announce or declare. "One that gives out himself Prince Florizel." "Give out you are of Epidamnum."
(b)
To send out; to emit; to distribute; as, a substance gives out steam or odors.
To give over.
(a)
To yield completely; to quit; to abandon.
(b)
To despair of.
(c)
To addict, resign, or apply (one's self). "The Babylonians had given themselves over to all manner of vice."
To give place, to withdraw; to yield one's claim.
To give points.
(a)
In games of skill, to equalize chances by conceding a certain advantage; to allow a handicap.
(b)
To give useful suggestions. (Colloq.)
To give rein. See under Rein, n.
To give the sack. Same as To give the bag.
To give and take.
(a)
To average gains and losses.
(b)
To exchange freely, as blows, sarcasms, etc.
To give time (Law), to accord extension or forbearance to a debtor.
To give the time of day, to salute one with the compliment appropriate to the hour, as "good morning." "good evening", etc.
To give tongue, in hunter's phrase, to bark; said of dogs.
To give up.
(a)
To abandon; to surrender. "Don't give up the ship." "He has... given up For certain drops of salt, your city Rome."
(b)
To make public; to reveal. "I'll not state them By giving up their characters."
(c)
(Used also reflexively.)
To give up the ghost. See under Ghost.
To give one's self up, to abandon hope; to despair; to surrender one's self.
To give way.
(a)
To withdraw; to give place.
(b)
To yield to force or pressure; as, the scaffolding gave way.
(c)
(Naut.) To begin to row; or to row with increased energy.
(d)
(Stock Exchange) To depreciate or decline in value; as, railroad securities gave way two per cent.
To give way together, to row in time; to keep stroke.
Synonyms: To Give, Confer, Grant. To give is the generic word, embracing all the rest. To confer was originally used of persons in power, who gave permanent grants or privileges; as, to confer the order of knighthood; and hence it still denotes the giving of something which might have been withheld; as, to confer a favor. To grant is to give in answer to a petition or request, or to one who is in some way dependent or inferior.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |
Add this dictionary
to your browser search bar





"Give" Quotes from Famous Books



... did not always seem so desperate and hazardous as it was; and it would have been chosen by the bold spirit of Fergus whether you had approved it or no; your counsels only served to give unity and consistence to his conduct; to dignify, but not to precipitate, his resolution.' Flora had soon ceased to listen to Edward, and was again intent ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... the hot months of summer. Warreners, as some have assured me, are much infested by them on chalky downs, where these insects swarm sometimes to so infinite a degree as to discolour their nets, and to give them a reddish cast, while the men are so bitten as to be ...
— The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1 • Gilbert White

... performer on the piano for a girl of her years. At fourteen she had begun vocal training. Possessed of a strong, clear, soprano voice, three years under the direction of competent instructors had done much for her, and, although she was far too selfish to use her fine voice merely to give pleasure to others, she never allowed an opportunity to pass wherein she might win public approval ...
— Marjorie Dean - High School Sophomore • Pauline Lester

... whale-boat made a sail coming down before the wind, and apparently steering for South Cape, as well as herself. This turned out to be the Anne, which had gone to windward to give the alarm to the fishermen, and was now on her return. She had warned so many boats as to be certain they would spread the notice, and she had spoken the Dragon, which had gone in quest of the Jonas and the Abraham, both of which were a few leagues to windward. Capt. ...
— The Crater • James Fenimore Cooper

... you know, it's the most mysterious, extraordinary thing. It's a code society has built up to protect itself and to govern itself, and when you go into it it's the most marvellous code that ever was invented. All sorts of things that the law doesn't give, and couldn't give, our conventions shove in on us in the most amazing way. And all probably originated by a lot of Mother Grundy-ish old women, that's what's so extraordinary. You know, if all the greatest legal minds of all the ages had ...
— If Winter Comes • A.S.M. Hutchinson

... and attack the Dutch armament. The ships being properly manned, and their sides lined with saltpetre, they fell down the river, and found the Dutch squadron drawn up in a line of battle, in order to give them a warm reception, for which indeed they seemed well prepared; for three of them were mounted with thirty-six guns each, three of them with twenty-six, and the seventh carried sixteen. The duke of Dorset, commanded by captain Forrester, being ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... liquids (oil or water?) on the flames. When, therefore, the great fire of 1666 followed the plague of the preceding year, these hieroglyphics again attracted attention, and the maker of them was called before Parliament to declare if he, who had foreseen these events, could see into them, and give any explanation of their causes. But Lilly was prudent: to the question, 'Did you foresee the year of the fire?' he replied: 'I did not; nor was I desirous; of that I made no scrutiny.' As to the cause of the fire, ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. IV. October, 1863, No. IV. - Devoted to Literature and National Policy. • Various

... was one of Mr. H. G. Wells', probably "The Sleeper Awakes," or some other of his brilliant fantasies and predictions, for I was in a mood conducive to belief in almost anything when, later, we sat down together across the table. I only wish I could give some idea of the atmosphere that permeated our apartments, the reality it lent to whatever was vast and amazing and strange. You could then, whoever you are, understand a little the ease with which I ...
— The Coming of the Ice • G. Peyton Wertenbaker

... chapters will show that the civil, legal, industrial and educational rights of women are so far secured as to give full assurance that they will be absolute in the near future. The political rights are further off, for reasons which are presented in the introduction to this volume, but the yielding of all the ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV • Various

... military service, is the increase remarkable, for it would be to members of those classes that the allotments would be chiefly assigned. Moreover, the poor whom the rich expelled from their lands did not give in their names to the censors, and did not attend to the education of their children. These men would, on receiving allotments, enrol themselves. The consul of the year 132 inscribed on a public monument that he was the first who had turned the shepherds out of ...
— The Gracchi Marius and Sulla - Epochs Of Ancient History • A.H. Beesley

... they know, at least, how to act circumspectly? There is an island; on that island there are trees; under those trees, terrestrial animals, bearers of cutlets and roast beef, to which I would willingly give a trial." ...
— Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea • Jules Verne

... could have supplied the editor with the Colon: a little girl who had much difficulty in understanding its use, one day complained that a pain in her stomach was as bad as a colon. The pictures in Geography are not so good as they might have been; and it would have been easy to give correct outlines of animals, since others mislead children. Music made easy is better, as are Steps to Dancing. The Chronology is faulty and ill-adapted for children: what do the little dears want to ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume 19, No. 533, Saturday, February 11, 1832. • Various

... the world. Tell her I have returned, that I am tired and have gone to bed, and will give her the news ...
— Cap'n Dan's Daughter • Joseph C. Lincoln

... remarks on Fairy Knockers I will give one more quotation from Bingley, who sums up the matter ...
— Welsh Folk-Lore - a Collection of the Folk-Tales and Legends of North Wales • Elias Owen

... them ranged along side of us about the distance of three miles. The greatest diameter of the largest appeared to me at that distance as if it would measure ten feet. They retired from us with a wind at S.E. leaving an impression upon my mind to which I can give no name, though surely one ingredient in it was fear, with a considerable deal of wonder and astonishment. It was in vain to think of flying; the swiftest horse, or fastest sailing ship, could be of no use to carry us out of ...
— The Botanic Garden - A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: The Economy of Vegetation • Erasmus Darwin

... expectation of a settlement, after the violent convulsions to which they had been exposed; and to have no prospect of that blessing but from the dissolution of the present parliament, and from the summoning of a new one, free and full, who, meeting without oaths or engagements, might finally give contentment to the nation: that applications had been made to him for that purpose; but that he, sensible of his duty, had still told the petitioners, that the parliament itself, which was now free, and would soon be full, was the best judge of all these ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part E. - From Charles I. to Cromwell • David Hume

... conquest by the Raja of Gorkha, I might altogether refer on the subject to Colonel Kirkpatrick’s account, contained in his eighth chapter; but for the sake of connection, and in order to communicate my opinions on the subject, I shall here give an abstract of Colonel Kirkpatrick’s account, referring to his own work ...
— An Account of The Kingdom of Nepal • Fancis Buchanan Hamilton

... ways of life were changed. In the Doctor's little household, as in very many others, the articles of daily consumption that were wanted were purchased every evening, in small quantities and at various small shops. To avoid attracting notice, and to give as little occasion as possible for talk and envy, ...
— A Tale of Two Cities - A Story of the French Revolution • Charles Dickens

... to Mademoiselle Esther Gobseck, I give and bequeath the sum of seven hundred and sixty thousand francs to the Board of Asylums of Paris for the foundation of a refuge especially dedicated to the use of public prostitutes who may wish to forsake their life of vice ...
— Scenes from a Courtesan's Life • Honore de Balzac

... odour of newly-baked cakes floated along the passage from the kitchens right into the room, and a piece of tapestry, one of Dorothy's first attempts, depended over the doorway of the carved wooden screen to keep out draughts, and at the same time give a warm and pleasing ...
— Heiress of Haddon • William E. Doubleday

... poured upon them a hail of bullets; Isajewicz, Wilbik, and Razor fell wounded; then the gentry were checked by Robak on one side and Maciej on the other. The gentry cooled in their ardour, glanced about, and retired; the Muscovites saw this, and Captain Rykov planned to give the final blow, to drive the gentry from the yard and seize ...
— Pan Tadeusz • Adam Mickiewicz

... doctor, was summoned here to give counsel. I gave counsel, but it passed over the heads of these wise ones like a shadow of which none took note. I was asked to prophesy of what would chance if war came. I called the dead from their graves; they came in voices, ...
— Finished • H. Rider Haggard

... she must be a nuisance, because she doesn't like dogs; so that Mrs. Gisborne can only take the old one, which she could never part with. So she wanted to give Mab to some one who would be kind to her; and she has come to the right shop; hasn't ...
— The Trial - or, More Links of the Daisy Chain • Charlotte M. Yonge

... as it was known that Lisle was about to attempt to swim the river, several volunteers came forward; and from these he selected one of the Sikh soldiers, not only because he was a tall and powerful man, but because he could give him orders in Punjabi. As soon as night came on, the preparations were completed. A length of wire, that would be sufficient to cross the river, was laid out on the bank from the spot that seemed to offer most advantages for a bridge. In this way, as they swam out the line would go with them, and ...
— Through Three Campaigns - A Story of Chitral, Tirah and Ashanti • G. A. Henty

... similar events. One or two listened to him for lack of anything better to do. There was a general sensation of blankness. They were all thrown. Life had let them down. Under the circumstances, to most of them it seemed an excellent idea to go to church. Vane joined them presently. He was able to give them many details and excite their interest. They crowded round him, and he spoke nakedly. Death was nothing to him—he had seen so much. They heard the motor return ...
— The Grey Room • Eden Phillpotts

... good fellow," replied the stranger, "I ask it as a particular favor that you will not open your lips to me until we reach the town, unless I ask you a question. On that condition I will give you a half-a-crown ...
— The Black Baronet; or, The Chronicles Of Ballytrain - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... Scientific' works, prepared by eminent specialists, with the intention of popularizing information in their several branches of knowledge, has received a good accession in this compact and thoughtful volume. It is a difficult task to give the outlines of a complete theory of law in a portable volume, which he who runs may read, and probably Professor Amos himself would be the last to claim that he has perfectly succeeded in doing this. But he ...
— Fungi: Their Nature and Uses • Mordecai Cubitt Cooke

... down to which such earthenware was made, a broken vase disinterred from one of the mounds in my presence may give a clue. Its two handles represent Spaniards, with their European features, beard, Catalonian cap, and polainas, ...
— The Battle and the Ruins of Cintla • Daniel G. Brinton

... you would at any time give up your dinner to listen to a story, and as you will have no dinner to-day, I think it is but fair that I should consent to your wish. Who shall I begin with—with my husband ...
— The Little Savage • Captain Marryat

... variety of the carp—for the bones of the face to become greatly shortened. In the case of the dog, as H. Muller has shown, this seems caused by an abnormal state of the primordial cartilage. We may, however, readily admit that abundant and rich food supplied during many generations would give an inherited tendency to increased size of body, and that, from disuse, the limbs would become finer and shorter. (3/18. Nathusius 'Die Racen des Schweines' s. 71.) We shall in a future chapter see also that the skull and limbs are apparently in some manner correlated, ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication - Volume I • Charles Darwin

... as enthusiastic as Blanche. She was passionately fond of animals, and the young ones always charmed her. She was able to give Blanche instructions as to how Curly should be fed; and they made a set of very strict rules for his training, which was to begin ...
— Hunter's Marjory - A Story for Girls • Margaret Bruce Clarke

... said Sir Henry impatiently. "Here, old lady, give me the lamp," and taking it from Gagool's hand, he stepped through the doorway and held it high above ...
— King Solomon's Mines • H. Rider Haggard

... "I could no more guess a riddle to-day than I could give a dissertation on theology. Riddles are for rainy days in winter, when we sit by the fire in the evening wishing it were morning again. I know the great riddle at last—I have found it out. It is the most beautiful ...
— Marietta - A Maid of Venice • F. Marion Crawford

... thinking that it was better to give in to the Canadian, we followed Ned Land, whose long limbs threatened to distance us. He wound up the coast towards the west: then, fording some torrents, he gained the high plain that was bordered with admirable forests. Some kingfishers were rambling ...
— Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea • Jules Verne

... had given me a few pesetas out of the charities of the church. He frequently called me a bribon and impostor. At last, one morning I went to him, and said that I had proposed to return to Madrid, in order to lay the matter before the government, and requested that he would give me a certificate to the effect that I had performed a pilgrimage to Saint James, which I imagined would be of assistance to me upon the way, as it would enable me to beg with some colour of authority. He no sooner heard this request, than, without saying ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... come to the outside, he reined her in hard and led her to the jump, swinging from the saddle as he did so in order to give both Kit and himself a fair chance. The pony, released from the weight of the rider before she struck ground, met it in a fair stride, and without losing footing kept up the gait to the bottom of the hillock, ...
— The Boy With the U. S. Foresters • Francis Rolt-Wheeler

... about one in the morning contained no particulars of the terms upon which New York had yielded—nor did they give any intimation of the quality of the brief conflict that had preceded the capitulation. The later issues remedied these deficiencies. There came the explicit statement of the agreement to victual the German airships, to supply the complement of explosives to replace those employed in the fight ...
— The War in the Air • Herbert George Wells

... sculpture, which is being done by a number of artists, will be of the most artistic and beautiful order. This memorial will occupy an entire block, and it is located very near the Capitol. All the old buildings in the vicinity will be torn down to give a fine vista for this transcendently ...
— Italy, the Magic Land • Lilian Whiting

... replied Fancher. "The last five men scheduled to leave are taking care of any customers who come in, and the rest of them are packing supplies into the trucks. As soon as I get word from the flower shop that the last pair has cleared, I give another pair the ...
— Rebels of the Red Planet • Charles Louis Fontenay

... how can I drive the mother who bore me from my father's house? My father is abroad and we do not know whether he is alive or dead. It will be hard on me if I have to pay Icarius the large sum which I must give him if I insist on sending his daughter back to him. Not only will he deal rigorously with me, but heaven will also punish me; for my mother when she leaves the house will call on the Erinyes to avenge her; besides, it would not be a creditable thing to do, and I will ...
— The Odyssey • Homer

... please you, Miss Cullen," I said, "and I'd like to give Lord Ralles a chance to show us how to handle those gentry; but it's not to be done." I really should have been glad to have the road agents pay ...
— Master Tales of Mystery, Volume 3 • Collected and Arranged by Francis J. Reynolds

... making himself obnoxious to his wife beyond her very limited capacity for endurance. Not only had he proved a faithless husband, but what was infinitely worse to her mind, he refused to give up the income of her Ettrick Forest estate, which she had made over to him in the days when his handsome face and figure had first struck her fancy, and when she thought nothing too costly to lavish upon him. She had made him great, to her own and ...
— Studies from Court and Cloister • J.M. Stone

... give your best to whatever passes through your hands. Stamp it with your manhood. Let superiority be your trade-mark, let it characterize everything you touch. This is what every employer is looking for. It indicates the best kind of brain; ...
— Pushing to the Front • Orison Swett Marden

... been able," continued Lucy, "to give him my picture in return, which I am very much vexed at, for he has been always so anxious to get it! But I am determined to set for ...
— Persuasion • Jane Austen

... Darth. He had to return his crew, and there was something else. Several something elses. He arrived in that solar-system and put his yacht in a search-orbit, listening for the call-signal the spaceboat should give for him to home on. He found it, deep within the gravity-field of Darth. He maneuvered to come alongside, and there was blinding light everywhere. Alarms rang. Lights went out. Instruments registered impossibilities, the rockets ...
— The Pirates of Ersatz • Murray Leinster

... the President, "unless there is an awakened public sentiment that compels action. Give me that, and I'll either put the subject in my next message to Congress or send a special message. I'm from Missouri on this point," continued the President. "Show me that the American people want their Falls preserved, and I'll do the rest. But I've got to be shown." ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok (1863-1930)

... connection it is well to remember that the question of Egypt and the Sudan was only one of many that distracted the attention of Ministers. The events outside Suakim alone might give them pause before they plunged into the Sudan; for that was the time when Russia was moving on towards Afghanistan; and the agreement between the three Emperors imposed the need of caution on a State as isolated and unpopular as England then was. In ...
— The Development of the European Nations, 1870-1914 (5th ed.) • John Holland Rose

... agreement? You want to help your brother out of his trouble, I am sure. Now, that is a big amount of money, as you know, and even a banker can't always get up ready funds in such quantities as that, but suppose I give it to you?" ...
— The Desired Woman • Will N. Harben

... wife, he could never win of her the affection he gave and craved. Obviously proud of her, always devoted and kind, he received from her respect and consideration in return, which indeed was all she had to give, for the loss of Mauro remained to her ...
— The Red-Blooded Heroes of the Frontier • Edgar Beecher Bronson

... necessary to give special instructions for either of the edgings here illustrated, as both are given full size and the designs are perfectly distinct. No. 7 is finished with a button-holed scallop from which the net is cut away when the work is completed. Either edging ...
— The Art of Modern Lace Making • The Butterick Publishing Co.

... learned from some fishermen that the British sloop-of-war Drake was at anchor in the roads. Jones was exceedingly anxious to attack her, and planned a night surprise, but again the violent wind interfered and he was forced to give up the scheme, so well suited to ...
— Dewey and Other Naval Commanders • Edward S. Ellis

... having left part of their force at Lastra, and by not having waited the arrival of Tolosetto Uberti, who had to come from Pistoia with three hundred horse; for they thought celerity rather than numbers would give them the victory; and it often happens, in similar enterprises, that delay robs us of the occasion, and too great anxiety to be forward prevents us of the power, or makes us act before ...
— History Of Florence And Of The Affairs Of Italy - From The Earliest Times To The Death Of Lorenzo The Magnificent • Niccolo Machiavelli

... him, and leave him lying here, where his gang can find him?" interrupted the younger Filmore, who, now that his blood was up, cared little what he did. "You give him one jab, and I will guarantee to ...
— Deadwood Dick, The Prince of the Road - or, The Black Rider of the Black Hills • Edward L. Wheeler

... liturgical. At ten o'clock, his breathing grew feebler {May 9th, 1760.}; and John de Watteville pronounced the Old Testament Benediction, "The Lord bless thee and keep thee. The Lord make His face shine upon thee and be gracious unto thee. The Lord lift up His countenance upon thee and give thee peace." As de Watteville spoke the last words of the blessing, the Count lay back on his pillow and closed his eyes; and a few seconds later ...
— History of the Moravian Church • J. E. Hutton

... piece of finery. Till at length she was no longer able to conceal her impatience, and turning to Laura, who sat next to her, she said, "You have no lace upon your cuffs. Look how beautiful mine is!—is not it? Don't you wish your mamma could afford to give some like it? But you can't get any if she would, for this was made on purpose for me on my birthday, and nobody can get a bit more anywhere, if they would ...
— The Parent's Assistant • Maria Edgeworth

... me was to give the whole thing away. My rig underneath, though good enough for your girl, Tom, on a holiday, wasn't just what they wear in the Square. And, d'ye know, you'll say it's silly, but I had a conviction that with that coat I should say good-by to the nerve I'd had since I got into the Bishop's ...
— In the Bishop's Carriage • Miriam Michelson

... would write you a little note, to remind you that I am at home, and already it has become a letter. Please remember—when you think of it at all—that it would give me pleasure to ...
— Ailsa Paige • Robert W. Chambers

... time when every day their love would laugh at the miles separating them; an early hour when they had waited just long enough to give Wanda time to ride hither and the Bar L-M men time to have gone about the day's work. And if Wayne were not upon his porch then Wanda was to understand that he was already ...
— The Short Cut • Jackson Gregory

... part—and I was now some considerable time in the house, unsuspected, yet a prisoner. The position was serious; but come, suppose the worst, that I was actually laid hold of as a malefactor, and commanded to give an account of myself. Well: I was, as aforesaid, a distant relation of the individual next door. I belonged to nobody in the world, if not to him; I bore but an indifferent reputation in regard to steadiness; ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 461 - Volume 18, New Series, October 30, 1852 • Various

... iron and steel, manganese, chromium, nickel, tungsten, molybdenum, vanadium, zirconium, titanium, aluminum, uranium, magnesium, fluorine, silicon, and other substances play important parts, either as accessories in the furnace reactions or as ingredients introduced to give ...
— The Economic Aspect of Geology • C. K. Leith

... and I hate to leave it without some more adequate expression of the noble edifice, with its rich domain, all as I saw them in that beautiful sunshine; for, if a day had been chosen out of a hundred years, it could not have been a finer one. But I must give up the attempt; only further remarking that the finest trees here were cedars, of which I saw one—and there may have been many such—immense in girth and not less than three centuries old. I likewise saw ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, No. 48, October, 1861 • Various

... Japs has been shadowing me all morning, Pennington," I advised him. "He 's as shifty and evasive as a fox. Fall half a block behind me, and if he shows up again give me a signal and ...
— The Paternoster Ruby • Charles Edmonds Walk

... little to make a school or a court-room laugh, and the speech had appeared to give a good deal of amusement to ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 9 • Various

... fellow, don't now forget to come back to us safe and sound in life and limb," cried Terence, laughing; "remember the fright I gave you and Jack. Don't give him and me the same, and we'll take care that Pigeon does not malign your ...
— The Three Midshipmen • W.H.G. Kingston

... Alcott. "We had charming playmates in the little Emersons, Channings, Goodwins and Hawthornes, with the illustrious parents and their friends to enjoy our pranks and share our excursions.... My wise mother, anxious to give me a strong body to support a lively brain, turned me loose in the country and let me run wild, learning of Nature what no books can teach, and being led—as those who truly love her seldom fail to be—'through ...
— Ten American Girls From History • Kate Dickinson Sweetser

... Now Laura can't come to-morrow! She is certainly the most unfortunate being in the universe. She became very much interested in a deaf man that she met in her settlement work, and so as to give the poor thing employment she appointed him Superintendent of the Working Boys' Club. Now the working boys refuse to play with him and the directors have had a meeting asking Laura to remove him at once. ...
— Ladies-In-Waiting • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... you see," returned the guide, with an amused look, "I cannot give you permission ...
— The Rover of the Andes - A Tale of Adventure on South America • R.M. Ballantyne

... give warning any more," replied Frank, "Of course, the reason is obvious enough. To give warning it would be necessary for the submarine to come to the surface, in which case the merchant ship might be able to place a shell aboard the U-Boat before she could submerge ...
— The Boy Allies with the Victorious Fleets - The Fall of the German Navy • Robert L. Drake

... throw yourself away at eighteen on a commonplace boy with a glib tongue and a high opinion of himself? Don't tell me that it will make you happy. That would be the worst of all, if you turned out to be so limited that you were satisfied,—that would be a living death. O my darling, I give you my word that if you will give up this idea, ten years from now, when you see this boy, still glib, still vain, and perhaps a little fat, you will actually shudder when you think how near he came ...
— The Happiest Time of Their Lives • Alice Duer Miller

... River, I contemplated writing to you respecting the colored troops and to suggest that, as they have been fully tested as soldiers, their pay should be raised to that of white troops, and I desire now to give my testimony in their behalf. You are aware that I have been engaged in the organization of freedmen for over a year, and have necessarily been thrown in constant ...
— History of the Negro Race in America from 1619 to 1880. Vol. 2 (of 2) - Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens • George Washington Williams

... interjected. "I was pretty good at that sort of thing in the war. The officers said I had a mighty good nose—for smelling I mean," he made haste to add for fear his pals would accuse him of personal vanity. "In some of the trenches they used rats and canary birds to give warning of gas. But I was the official smeller for my bunch, and I got so I was pretty good at it if ...
— The Boy Ranchers in Death Valley - or Diamond X and the Poison Mystery • Willard F. Baker

... skies. Those artists who, day after day, could so falsely represent what was forever before their eyes, when it was to be one of the most important and attractive parts of their picture, can scarcely be expected to give with truth what they could see only partially and at intervals, and what was only to be in their picture a blue line in the horizon, or a bright spot under the ...
— Modern Painters Volume I (of V) • John Ruskin

... Shall deep and long lament, such numerous ills Achaia's host hath at his hands sustain'd. 60 But haste, begone, and at their several ships Call Ajax and Idomeneus; I go To exhort the noble Nestor to arise, That he may visit, if he so incline, The chosen band who watch, and his advice 65 Give them; for him most prompt they will obey, Whose son, together with Meriones, Friend of Idomeneus, controls them all, Entrusted by ourselves with that command. Him answer'd Menelaus bold in arms. 70 Explain thy purpose. Wouldst thou that I wait Thy coming, there, ...
— The Iliad of Homer - Translated into English Blank Verse • Homer

... the queen, that she should send her daughter to this place, that she might be married to King Achilles; and I magnified the man to her, saying that he would in no wise sail with us unless I would give him my daughter in marriage. But now I have changed my purpose and have written another letter after this fashion, as I will now set forth to thee: 'Daughter of Leda, send not thy child to the land of Euboea, for I will give her in marriage ...
— Myths and Legends of All Nations • Various

... they have; none of them refusing anything he may possess when he is asked for it, but on the contrary inviting us to ask them. They exhibit great love toward all others in preference to themselves: they also give objects of great value for trifles, and content themselves with very ...
— Eighth Reader • James Baldwin

... the villain of the piece? No, the devil is not so black as he is painted, nor the angel so white. And hence these incessant swings of the philosophical pendulum as one truth or the other is perceived. The true ethics of the future will give the devil his due, and deduct a discount ...
— Without Prejudice • Israel Zangwill

... needles and bark from his clothes. "I go out with little gun you give me. I hunt, no see squirrel. Go out no gun—see squirrel. I chase him up tree—I climb high—awful high. No good. Squirrel he too quick. He run right ...
— Tales of lonely trails • Zane Grey

... you come here and stuff us up with promises that you can never keep. I'm jolly well fed up. I thought you were such a sport and—oh, what's the use of talking. You don't give a damn. ...
— I'll Leave It To You - A Light Comedy In Three Acts • Noel Coward

... Zada, ending the interview with a labored yawn. But when Dyckman bowed and turned to go, her curiosity bested her indignation. "In case I should by any chance see him, could I give him ...
— We Can't Have Everything • Rupert Hughes

... of marriage, the young couple will acquire for themselves a room in the house and village of the husband, in which they set up housekeeping on their own account. In addition to these personal services rendered to the parents of the bride, the man or his father and other relatives give to the girl's parents at the time of the marriage various articles which are valuable in proportion to the social standing of the parties, and which are generally appropriated ...
— The Pagan Tribes of Borneo • Charles Hose and William McDougall

... first raised the question of ownership, none of us who investigated the matter at the time of its particular acuteness, was able to determine satisfactorily, although some of us had a well-defined suspicion. The man is now dead, and I shall not give his name. Article I, of the Treaty of Paris, of December 10, 1898, presumably disposes of the Cuban area; Article II refers to Porto Rico; and Article III refers to the Philippines. The issue regarding ...
— Cuba, Old and New • Albert Gardner Robinson

... willing to give clients every facility for finding him, when they had once started at the bottom of the building; and would, as it were, lead them gently on, by successive signs; but good luck and a good name, slowly but surely acquired, ...
— Round the Block • John Bell Bouton

... for Portia's hand, the bond, which, when forfeited, would have cost Antonio his life had not Portia, disguised as a lawyer, defeated Shylock's treacherous design. There is the plot which tells how Bassanio and his friend Gratiano give their wedding rings as rewards to the pretended lawyer and his assistant, really their wives Portia and Nerissa in disguise,—an act which gives the wives a chance to make much trouble for their lords. And all these plots are worked out with ...
— An Introduction to Shakespeare • H. N. MacCracken

... said I, "that such men as this John Mason often have wealth and some shrewdness of mind to give them power in ...
— Off-Hand Sketches - a Little Dashed with Humor • T. S. Arthur

... shop. And now I'll tell you what to do. I want you to go in, and ask for a couple of rolls. They come at three cents apiece. Here's some money to pay for them. It is a silver dollar, as you see. You will give this to them, and they will give you back ninety-four cents in change. ...
— Timothy Crump's Ward - A Story of American Life • Horatio Alger

... has power to pardon transgressions, in whom the name of God is (Exodus xxiii:20-23). He is the angel of His Presence who saved them (Isaiah lxiii:9) and Exodus xxxiii:14 must refer to this Being "My presence shall go with thee and I will give thee rest." This angel of Jehovah speaks in the Book of Judges and declared, "I made you to go up out of Egypt, and have brought you into the land which I sware unto your fathers; and I said I will ...
— The Lord of Glory - Meditations on the person, the work and glory of our Lord Jesus Christ • Arno Gaebelein

... friend to be trusted to the death; a man without his price, incorruptible, with whom a secret, say, would be as safe as if buried in the grave. He would not give it even to the wind, and no reed on his land would whisper 'Midas has ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, April, 1876. • Various

... necessary, I think, in order more completely to shew the improbability of any approach in man towards immortality on earth, to urge the very great additional weight that an increase in the duration of life would give to ...
— An Essay on the Principle of Population • Thomas Malthus

... long suspension of the sense excites the expectation of a thought less common than the concluding one; and is an instance of a failure in doing what is most needful and most difficult in an epitaph to do; namely to give to universally received truths a pathos and spirit which shall re-admit them into the soul like revelations of ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... upon her," she was saying. "I wonder that you ask such a question. She is Miss Dayton's friend, and that, in itself, is enough to make me wish to go. Miss Dayton is all that is lovely and I would do much to please her; but aside from that, this girl is a stranger and I am asked to give her my friendship. I shall call upon her the day which she has set, and I shall go intending to like Miss ...
— Randy and Her Friends • Amy Brooks

... said the Prime Minister, who was not in the mood for handing out bouquets. "And would you run down to Tolness and settle up that infernal commission of inquiry? They've been asking questions in the House, and I can give no very definite reply. Solebury threatened to force a division when the vote came up. Undoubtedly there's been a great deal of extravagance, but you may be able to ...
— Bones in London • Edgar Wallace

... him, they were seized with alarm lest he should make himself the leader of the people and destroy their despotic power. Accordingly they drew up a list of three thousand citizens, to whom they announced that they would give a share in the constitution. Theramenes, however, criticized this scheme also, first on the ground that, while proposing to give all respectable citizens a share in the constitution, they were actually giving it only to three thousand persons, ...
— The Athenian Constitution • Aristotle

... very generally embraced by the quarrymen and sand-diggers. [350:4] Thus it was that when persecution raged in the capital, the Christian felt himself comparatively safe in the catacombs. The parties in charge of them were his friends; they could give him seasonable intimation of the approach of danger; and among these "dens and caves of the earth," with countless places of ingress and egress, the officers of government must have attempted in vain to ...
— The Ancient Church - Its History, Doctrine, Worship, and Constitution • W.D. [William Dool] Killen

... is too late to court my dear daughter, my lord, but not too late to repent. We read, 'tis never too late to do that. If others have been received at the eleventh hour, is there any reason why you should give ...
— The Virginians • William Makepeace Thackeray

... Lord about it. Their prayer was answered by an angel who told them that his name was John, called John the Baptist, who had baptized Jesus in the river Jordan. He said he had come to restore a portion of the holy Priesthood, even that part which would give them power to baptize for the remission of sins, but not to lay on hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost. He promised them that if they were faithful this other power would be given ...
— A Young Folks' History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints • Nephi Anderson

... under its provisions, and the inauguration of the President. Within one short month, however, this President was expelled from the capital by a rebellion in the army, and the supreme power of the Republic was assigned to General Zuloaga. This usurper was in his turn soon compelled to retire and give ...
— State of the Union Addresses of James Buchanan • James Buchanan

... into silence, grew deeply interested in watching a spare old man who sat at a window with its shade drawn down. After a while we became accustomed to this odd sight and would laugh, and talk in whispers and give imitations, as we sat in a low sewing-chair, of the little old pendulating blind man at the window. Well, the old man was the gentle teacher's charge, and for this reason, possibly, her life had become an heroic one, ...
— The Complete Works • James Whitcomb Riley

... of a great nobleman, who did not care for music himself, but kept an orchestra for show. Lemm lived with him seven years in the capacity of orchestra conductor, and left him empty-handed. The nobleman was ruined, he intended to give him a promissory note, but in the sequel refused him even that—in short, did not pay him a farthing. He was advised to go away; but he was unwilling to return home in poverty from Russia, that great Russia which is a mine of gold for artists; he decided to remain and try his luck. For ...
— A House of Gentlefolk • Ivan Turgenev

... who had not read the Book, but who, as was the fashion with all those who were looking up to the government, condemned the Queen unheard. 'Now,' said I, 'be not so shamefully unjust; but get the book, read it, and then give your judgment.'—'Indeed,' said his wife, who was sitting by, 'but HE SHA'N'T,' pronouncing the words sha'n't with an emphasis and a voice tremendously masculine. 'Oh!' said I, 'if he SHA'N'T, that is another matter; but, if he sha'n't read, if he ...
— Advice to Young Men • William Cobbett

... winter be vain? "Sure ye champions of the south Speak many things from a silent mouth. And thine, meseems, last night did pray That ye might well be wed to-day. The year's ingathering feast it is, A goodly day to give thee bliss. Come hither, daughter, fine and fair, Here is a wooer from Whitewater. Fast away hath he gotten fame, And his father's name is e'en my name. Will ye lay hand within his hand, That blossoming fair our house may stand?" She laid her hand within his ...
— Poems By The Way & Love Is Enough • William Morris

... nearly so far as yours. What IS the matter with me? Give me another." She faced the cliff and whirled again. The stone spun out, not quite so ...
— Song of the Lark • Willa Cather

... like themselves," grinned Reddy, "if I was runnin' a business I'd be afraid to give those byes a job. They'd be ownin' the plant in ...
— Bert Wilson on the Gridiron • J. W. Duffield

... you, I am sure," he answered, taking the seat beside her, with his for-the-public smile, "but I give credit to the air; you are looking as brilliant at this outrageous hour as you would on your way to an afternoon at bridge." Then, the chauffeur having closed the door and taken his place in the machine, Feversham turned a little ...
— The Rim of the Desert • Ada Woodruff Anderson

... streams and the shady trees. He lived at Tibur with the Minorites on an elevation whence he could see the town and the course of the Aino as it flowed into the plain beneath him and through the quiet gardens, nor did anything else give ...
— The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and - Modern Times • Alfred Biese

... never knew the law of Moses, serve neither Saturday nor Sunday; neither do they give an entire day, at fixed intervals to the exterior worship of the Deity, as we do. But a case will not be found where they did not on certain occasions rest from work in order to offer the homage of their fidelity ...
— Explanation of Catholic Morals - A Concise, Reasoned, and Popular Exposition of Catholic Morals • John H. Stapleton

... Davie had killed him. Then, when the second trial ended, I came to the conclusion—Lord help my wits—that there was some underhanded work about the succession to the property, and my doubts appeared to receive confirmation by the news of Margaret's marriage. In any case, if I turned up to give evidence, I could only have helped to hang ...
— The Stowmarket Mystery - Or, A Legacy of Hate • Louis Tracy

... up to Kitty. The rapidity of her movement, her flushed and eager face, everything betrayed that something out of the common was going on in her. Kitty knew what this was, and had been watching her intently. She called Varenka at that moment merely in order mentally to give her a blessing for the important event which, as Kitty fancied, was bound to come to pass that day after dinner ...
— Anna Karenina • Leo Tolstoy

... dead and gone), as ideas enlarge and enlightenment progresses, the abstract merits of the profession now called swindling will be recognized. When that day comes, don't drag me out of my grave and give me a public funeral; don't take advantage of my having no voice to raise in my own defense, and insult me by a national statue. No! do me justice on my tombstone; dash me off, in one masterly sentence, ...
— No Name • Wilkie Collins

... worst, and I will do mine!" she replied, defiantly. "That is nothing to the point, however. What I have to say is this: You are a fool if you think that you or I can ever extort money from Ralph Mainwaring. He would give no credence whatever to anything that you might say, and if once my identity were revealed to him, he would go through fire and blood rather than that one shilling of his should ever ...
— That Mainwaring Affair • Maynard Barbour

... is that the "mind" knows neither external things nor itself. Its measuring and analyzing, its hoping and fearing, hating and desiring, never give it a true measure of life, nor any sense of real values. Ceaselessly active, it never really attains to knowledge; or, if we admit its knowledge, it ever falls short of wisdom, which comes only through intuition, the vision of ...
— The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali • Charles Johnston

... never seen grief more real and fervid. He swore, on his knees and with tears in his eyes, that if she recovered, if God would give her back to him, he would never again touch a card; for gambling was his passion, and even among amateurs he would have been accounted the softest of soft things. His prayer was answered, she did recover, and he proceeded to fulfill ...
— Marse Henry, Complete - An Autobiography • Henry Watterson

... o'er your house, ye lady fair, Give o'er your house to me, Or I sall bren yoursel therein, Bot and ...
— A Bundle of Ballads • Various

... executor, and guardian to his daughters till they should be twenty years old. This name was no sooner heard by my friend, than she exclaimed, in a tone of affright, "Executor! My uncle! What is that? What power does that give him?" ...
— Arthur Mervyn - Or, Memoirs of the Year 1793 • Charles Brockden Brown

... Then, with the cows, Ishall buy buffaloes; with the buffaloes, mares. When the mares have foaled, Ishall have plenty of horses; and when I sell them, plenty of gold. With that gold I shall get a house with four wings. And then a Brhman will come to my house, and will give me his beautiful daughter, with a large dowry. She will have a son, and I shall call him Soma{s}arman. When he is old enough to be danced on his father's knee, Ishall sit with a book at the back of the stable, and while I ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... could hear the low murmur of the wind twisting through the branches of our elms, and the whistle of it as it passed our gables. Once below I heard my father's step, quick and decisive, his voice raised to give an order, and the closing ...
— The Unspeakable Gentleman • John P. Marquand

... tearful smile; it constitutes all the movement, the grace, the exquisite charm of this delicate tranquil landscape. Then when winter comes the sky merges with the earth in a kind of chaos. Fogs come down thick and clinging. The white light mists, which in summer veil the bottom of the valley, give place to thick clouds and dark moving mountains, but slowly scattered by a red, cold sun. Wanderers ranging the uplands in the early morning might dream with the mystics in their ecstasy that they are walking ...
— The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) • Anatole France

... steadily for some time, then shook his head. "I don't seem to remember," he sighed sadly. Nor could he, after half an hour's more concentration. "I am sorry I cannot give you that information, gentlemen. But you will soon, we trust, have reason to believe that we are once more desirous of doing everything possible for the peace and ...
— Man of Many Minds • E. Everett Evans

... could get hold of 'em,' cried the indignant constable. 'I'd give 'em what for. Two windows 'ave they broke wi' their stones and their sluggin', an' one of 'em in the shop o' poor old Mrs. Dean. The old woman has hard enow work to make a livin' without rowdy young ...
— The Wolf Patrol - A Tale of Baden-Powell's Boy Scouts • John Finnemore

... admitted with words that he feared defeat, but when Mason had gnashed his teeth as he walked up and down his room at Alston, and striking the table with his clenched fist had declared his fears, "By heavens they will escape me again!" Dockwrath had not been able to give him substantial comfort. "The jury are not such fools as to take all that for gospel," he had said. But he had not said it with that tone of assured conviction which he had always used till Mr. Furnival's speech had been made. There could ...
— Orley Farm • Anthony Trollope

... not checked then, it cannot be done afterwards. Once they take to fighting nothing will keep them from it, and instead of being pleasurable companions they become positive nuisances. On the other hand, if properly broken they give very little trouble, and will not quarrel ...
— Dogs and All About Them • Robert Leighton

... in the City of Philadelphia: the Indians had quit yelling and slacked their running—but I did not know it then. It being a tolerable cold morning and I was heavily clad, I thought perhaps the Indians would give me a long chase, and probably that they would hold out better than I could; although at that time I did not feel the least tired or out of breath. I concluded to throw off my two coats and shoes, as I would then be better prepared ...
— Narrative of the Captivity of William Biggs among the Kickapoo Indians in Illinois in 1788 • William Biggs

... be alledged Congreve and other cotemporary authors melo-drame [most common spelling for this publication] the excressences of overloaded society Ella Rozenberg [this spelling is used in the header and first citation; later references use "Rosenberg"] put his hand to their heads and give them a lanch A poor fellow, half an ideot His coat and waiscoat ...
— The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor - Volume I, Number 1 • Stephen Cullen Carpenter

... innocent—there can be no reason in the world why he should consent to renounce his rights. It is not a mere matter of feeling. There is right in it one way or another—either on your side or else on the other side; and if it is on the other side, why should a man give up what belongs to him, why should he renounce what is—most ...
— The Marriage of Elinor • Margaret Oliphant

... enough to forget self for the good, for the service of mankind, thus putting yourself on the side of the universal and making it possible for you to give something that will in turn of itself bring fame, you had better be wise, and not lift the pen at all; for what you write will not be taken up, or, if it is, will soon be let ...
— What All The World's A-Seeking • Ralph Waldo Trine

... long before criticism ceases to imagine itself a controlling force, to give itself airs of sovereignty, and to issue decrees. As it exists it is mostly a mischief, though not the greatest mischief; but it may be greatly ameliorated in character and softened in manner by ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... might never rise up till he was taken. Once Arthur had him in his grip well he knew he was but a dead man. Mordred gathered his sergeants together, and bade them get quickly into their armour. He arrayed them in companies, and came out through the gates to give battle to the pursuers. Immediately he issued from the barriers the host ran to meet him. The contention was very grievous, for many were smitten and many overthrown. It proved but an ill adventure to Mordred, since his men were not able to stay against their adversaries. ...
— Arthurian Chronicles: Roman de Brut • Wace

... not give me any written report for fear that I might be captured. He did me the honor to say that my verbal ...
— The Shades of the Wilderness • Joseph A. Altsheler

... hog weight, give one tablespoonful in feed or swill once or twice daily. For hogs weighing two hundred pounds, the dose would be two tablespoonfuls; for a hog weighing ...
— The Veterinarian • Chas. J. Korinek

... Beauregard; and Beauregard acted in the same spirit when he sent Roger A. Pryor and three other aides to the fort to get definite assurance on the point of Federal surrender. But when Anderson, on the night of April 12, gave assurance that on April 15 he would give up his post if he should not receive contrary orders from Washington prior to that time, the four aides of General Beauregard who had been sent to the fort gave notice to the Confederate artillery commander, without consulting superior authority, that the answer was not satisfactory, ...
— Expansion and Conflict • William E. Dodd

... were Lombardy poplars. They attained a height that would give ample shade under most conditions, and too much when we were there, for the roads were very muddy, although they had dried in all other sections. Nearing Vernal, we passed Nathan Galloway's home, a cozy place set back some distance from the road. ...
— Through the Grand Canyon from Wyoming to Mexico • E. L. Kolb

... give up working," said the Baroness. "If you earn forty sous a day, Sundays excepted, that makes six hundred francs a year. Well, then, how much ...
— Cousin Betty • Honore de Balzac

... Yours, when you call me impudent; mine, when I call you modest, &c. While my superiors suffer me occasionally to sit down with them, I hope it will be thought that rather the Papal than the Cibberian forehead ought to be out of countenance." I give this as a specimen of Cibber's serious reasonings—they are poor; and they had been so from a greater genius; for ridicule and satire, being only a mere abuse of eloquence, can never be effectually opposed by truisms. Satire must be repelled ...
— Calamities and Quarrels of Authors • Isaac D'Israeli



Words linked to "Give" :   hand out, fork over, present, endow, indemnify, founder, crumple, express, occur, come about, commit, spoonfeed, undernourish, yield, malnourish, implode, allow for, dish out, cerebrate, bung, flop, inject, give a hang, scavenge, free, buckle, enfeoff, give rise, slang, salute, introduce, repair, wassail, tread, rent, give one's best, spit up, deal, pass, estimate, trust, dower, take place, hold, breastfeed, pony up, force-feed, let, giving, throw, dispense with, nurse, give voice, fork out, toast, give notice, countenance, utilise, compensate, give back, slop, go off, part with, abandon, accept, give the once over, slump, dispense, pass on, give a damn, confide, deliver, support, lunch, overfeed, starve, donate, jurisprudence, spring, give away, consent, distribute, eat, fall out, create, cave in, surrender, breakfast, accord, resign, happen, give-and-go, allot, grant, kick in, break, fodder, go on, give way, slide down, stretch, communicate, will, lead, visit, bring down, judge, move, allow, lend, apply, drink, transfer, range, give the bounce, change, recompense, open up, give it a try, pay, release, give and take, feed, swill, dedicate, proffer, mete out, let out, gauge, fall in, give the axe, give full measure, rededicate, crop, aliment, give or take, give it a whirl, give the eye, hand, provide, impose, cast, devote, utter, supply, law, convey, lot, pass out, make, give thanks, return, offer, gift, sneak, permit, impart, bottlefeed, give a hoot, execute, afford, vernacular, hap, chip in, subject, argot, springiness, show, drive home, open, have got, sacrifice, have, direct, suckle, burst, combine, repay, take, ease up, give suck, establish, give birth, give off, heap, give up, relinquish, patois, dine, deal out, intrust, generate, raffle, think, give the sack, produce, turn over, spare, give ear, fee, lactate, evince, give care, go for, lingo, dole out, bequeath, snap, give it the deep six, deed over, turn in, give the gate, utilize, deposit, pledge, regurgitate, hand over, inflict, performing arts, give forth, give chase, let loose, parcel out, treat, use



Copyright © 2022 Dictionary One.com