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Estrange   Listen
verb
Estrange  v. t.  (past & past part. estranged; pres. part. estranging)  
1.
To withdraw; to withhold; hence, reflexively, to keep at a distance; to cease to be familiar and friendly with. "We must estrange our belief from everything which is not clearly and distinctly evidenced." "Had we... estranged ourselves from them in things indifferent."
2.
To divert from its original use or purpose, or from its former possessor; to alienate. "They... have estranged this place, and have burned incense in it unto other gods."
3.
To alienate the affections or confidence of; to turn from attachment to enmity or indifference. "I do not know, to this hour, what it is that has estranged him from me." "He... had pretended to be estranged from the Whigs, and had promised to act as a spy upon them."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Estrange" Quotes from Famous Books



... man was totally wrecked. It turned out that the dictionary he had used (Arnold's, we think,)—a work of a hundred years back, and, from mere ignorance, giving slang translations from Tom Brown, L'Estrange, and other jocular writers—had put down the verb sterben (to die) with the following worshipful series of equivalents—1. To kick the bucket; 2. To cut one's stick; 3. To go to kingdom come; 4. To hop ...
— Narrative And Miscellaneous Papers • Thomas De Quincey

... being so severe with their children, scolding and criticizing them and crushing their childhood, make them secretive and deceitful instead of open and transparent, and estrange them and drive them away ...
— Pushing to the Front • Orison Swett Marden

... applied censorship under the restoration. A publication must be licensed, and the Company of Stationers still sought, for reasons of profit, to control printers by regulating their production. The licensing agent in chief was a character of picturesque uncertainty and spasmodic action, Roger L'Estrange, half fanatic, half politician, half hack writer, in fact half in many respects and whole only in the resulting contradictions of purpose and performance. On one point he was strong—a desire to ...
— The Isle Of Pines (1668) - and, An Essay in Bibliography by W. C. Ford • Henry Neville

... L'Estrange tells us a story in his collection of fables, of the cock and the horses. The cock was gotten to roost in the stable among the horses, and there being no racks or other conveniences for him, it seems he was forced to roost upon the ...
— Political Pamphlets • George Saintsbury

... a stranger or an enemy, but it is only a friend we grieve. The Holy Spirit is such a Friend, more tender and faithful than a mother; and shall we carelessly offend Him, and estrange ourselves from Him in spite of ...
— When the Holy Ghost is Come • Col. S. L. Brengle

... length acceded to; and "accordingly," says Dr. Glennie, "to Harrow he went, as little prepared as it is natural to suppose from two years of elementary instruction, thwarted by every art that could estrange the mind of youth from preceptor, from school, and from ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. I. (of VI.) - With his Letters and Journals. • Thomas Moore

... both to entertain such numbers at meals, we have often had to remain without food all day. Of course this, with many other difficulties, will be overcome by a command of their language, but any attempt to carry out order without a fair knowledge of their tongue might only insult and estrange them." ...
— Metlakahtla and the North Pacific Mission • Eugene Stock

... and resolved themselves into a questioning doubt, whether there had not been a day when another, and a kinder face bent over my little cot, and smiled upon me with a sweetness that did not chill and estrange me ...
— The Doctor's Daughter • "Vera"

... been made upon her life. Count Simon's unscrupulousness was an old tale, but this crime was not only cold-blooded but also extraordinarily stupid, since the faintest suspicion of foul play would finally estrange the one person in all Maasau whose help was necessary to the success of his plans and hopes. It is to be doubted whether the Count's ineptitude did not disgust the Chancellor more thoroughly ...
— A Modern Mercenary • Kate Prichard and Hesketh Vernon Hesketh-Prichard

... the ravishing, ardent, passionate woman who was the first of many to carry Louis' heart by storm, and to be established in his palace as his mistress—to inaugurate for him a new life of pleasure, and to estrange him still more from his unhappy Queen, shut up with her prayers and her tears in her own room, with her tapestry, her books of history, and her music for sole relaxation. "The most innocent pleasures," Queen Marie wrote sadly at this time, ...
— Love affairs of the Courts of Europe • Thornton Hall

... Christianity, the second person in the Trinity. This is the reason why William of Auvergne, bishop of Paris in the thirteenth century, regarded Avicebron as a Christian. And these same reasons were no doubt adequate to estrange Jewish readers, as Abraham ibn Daud expressly tells us about himself, though his terms are ...
— A History of Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy • Isaac Husik

... step and an abstracted air, Harley L'Estrange bent his way towards Egerton's house, after his eventful interview with Helen. He had just entered one of the streets leading into Grosvenor Square, when a young man, walking quickly from the opposite direction, came full against him, and drawing back with a brief ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 5, No. 3, March, 1852 • Various

... the Chateau l'Estrange!" exclaimed La Touche. "The rabble have attacked the house, and set it on fire. Fortunately, none of the family are at home except the old domestics, and they, poor people, will too probably be sacrificed. The villains would like to treat my chateau in the ...
— Paddy Finn • W. H. G. Kingston

... this circumstance in especial contributed to estrange him from her; after he had fairly examined himself, and her, and the one that was at home, he formed a judgment, by comparison, upon the principles of them both. She, just as might be expected from a person of respectable ...
— The Comedies of Terence - Literally Translated into English Prose, with Notes • Publius Terentius Afer, (AKA) Terence

... letter, and so coolness had followed, and the old friendship seemed dead. Christine was grieved at this, for she realised well enough that he had broken off all intercourse with his comrades for her sake. She constantly reverted to the subject; she did not want to estrange him from his friends, and indeed she insisted that he should invite them. But, though he promised to set matters right, he did nothing of the kind. It was all over; what was the use of raking ...
— His Masterpiece • Emile Zola

... Here is my ticket! It is not you I am showing it to, but this honorable man from whom you are trying to estrange me by your attack. Kaempe, give your ticket to Mr. Piepenbrink. He is the man to judge of all the tickets in ...
— The German Classics Of The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries, Volume 12 • Various

... this? Not that the bride was displeased with the embraces of her amorous bridegroom; for, though some have remarked that cats are subject to ingratitude, yet women and cats too will be pleased and purr on certain occasions. The truth is, as the sagacious Sir Roger L'Estrange observes, in his deep reflections, that, "if we shut Nature out at the door, she will come in at the window; and that puss, though a madam, will be a mouser still." In the same manner we are not to arraign the squire of any want of love for his ...
— The History of Tom Jones, a foundling • Henry Fielding

... them nay. This was a critical event for English supremacy in South Africa, this final act of supreme weakness and folly! Many of her most loyal subjects from that moment have wavered on the brink, and some have gone over to the side of the Africander Bond. It is such actions as these which estrange the Colonists, and which give a little reality to the bondsman's dream of a United South ...
— South Africa and the Transvaal War, Vol. 1 (of 6) - From the Foundation of Cape Colony to the Boer Ultimatum - of 9th Oct. 1899 • Louis Creswicke

... war in Ireland brought fresh cares to the aged Queen. It drained her treasury. The old splendour of her Court waned and disappeared. Only officials remained about her, "the other of the Council and nobility estrange themselves by all occasions." The love and reverence of the people itself lessened as they felt the pressure and taxation of the war. Of old men had pressed to see the Queen as if it were a glimpse of heaven. "In ...
— History of the English People, Volume V (of 8) - Puritan England, 1603-1660 • John Richard Green

... said Clarence. "Is there anything in the fate of Clinton L'Estrange that calls forth your pity? If so, you would gratify a much better feeling than curiosity if you would inform me of it. The fact is that I came here to seek him; for I have been absent from the country many years, ...
— The Disowned, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... ekvidi. Essay (trial) provo. Essay provi. Essence esenco. Essence (oil) oleo. Essential esenca. Establish fondi. Estate bieno. Esteem estimi. Estimable estiminda. Estimate (appraise) taksi. Estimate estimi. Estimate, appraisement taksado. Estimation estimado. Estrange forigi. Estuary estuario. Eternal eterna. Eternity eterneco. Ether etero. Ethereal etera. Ethical etika. Ethnography etnografio. Ethology etologio. Etiology etiologio. Etiquette etiketo. Etymology vortodeveno. Eucharist Euxkaristo. Eulogize lauxdegi. Eulogy lauxdego. ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... appears in the editio princeps of 1689 (inaccessible to me).' Unfortunately he can find no analogy and is obliged to draw attention to other sources. He points to The Virgin Captive, the fifth story in Roger L'Estrange's The Spanish Decameron (1687). Again: there is the famous legend of the lovers of Teruel as dramatized in 1638 by Juan Perez de Montalvan, Los Amantes de Teruel. An earlier comedia exists on the same subject written by A. Rey ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn - Volume V • Aphra Behn

... seas. When the United States lodged its protests on February 12th the German Navy wanted to ignore it. The Foreign Office was inclined to listen to President Wilson's arguments. Even the people, while they were enthusiastic for a submarine war, did not want to estrange America if they could prevent it. The von Tirpitz press bureau, which knew that public opposition to its plan could be overcome by raising the cry that America was not neutral in aiding the Allies with supplies, launched an anti-American campaign. ...
— Germany, The Next Republic? • Carl W. Ackerman

... we now feel Ten thousand ills can face and foil, And passing years afresh reveal— We better are for cure and toil! I would not then my lot exchange For one where pampered luxury The hearts of man and wife estrange, And all is insincerity. A lot like this, Devoid of bliss, Dear wife, may ...
— The Emigrant Mechanic and Other Tales In Verse - Together With Numerous Songs Upon Canadian Subjects • Thomas Cowherd

... were under close surveillance by government officials. One of these was Muddiman, a good scholar and an "arch rogue", who had formerly "written for the Parliament" but who later became a paid spy. L'Estrange, who had a patent on "the sole right of intelligence", wrote in his Intelligencer that he was alarmed at the ill effects of "the ordinary written papers of Parliament's news ... making coffee houses and all the popular clubs judges ...
— All About Coffee • William H. Ukers

... seem that Overbury's knowledge of James's character was deeper than Rochester had given him credit for, and that he had been a true prophet when he predicted that his marriage would eventually estrange James from his minion. At this time, however, Rochester stood higher than ever in the royal favour; but it did not last long—conscience, that busy monitor, was at work. The tongue of rumour was never still; and Rochester, who had long been a guilty, became at last a wretched ...
— Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds • Charles Mackay

... glory! Here there were friends! Ah, night will fall And clouds or the stars will cover all, But I, when I go as a ghost again To the gaunt, grim buttes, to the friendly plain I know that for all that time can do To scatter the faithful, estrange the true— Quietly, in the lavender sage, Will be waiting the friends of ...
— Roosevelt in the Bad Lands • Hermann Hagedorn

... of many coals is kindled; and a sinful man lieth in wait for blood. Take heed of an evil-doer, for he contriveth wicked things; lest haply he bring upon thee blame for ever. Receive a stranger into thine house, and he will distract thee with brawls, and estrange ...
— Select Masterpieces of Biblical Literature • Various

... and dun me for it. If I have any one who's nice, you come and ask for her. What's left to me is this low waiting-maid, but as you see that she serves me faithfully, you naturally can't stand it, and you're doing your utmost to estrange her from me so as to be the better able to play your tricks ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book II • Cao Xueqin

... give him the lie. (Here, of course, I am not contrasting him with the Invisible King, but with more ancient and still more Asian divinities.) It is the moral pretensions tagged on by the theologians to metaphysical Godhead that revolt and estrange reasonable men—Mr. Wells among the rest. If you tell us that behind the Veil we shall find a good-natured, indulgent old man, who chastens us only for our good, is pleased by our flatteries (with or without music), and is ...
— God and Mr. Wells - A Critical Examination of 'God the Invisible King' • William Archer

... often change us— The thoughtless sentence or the fancied slight— Destroy long years of friendship and estrange us, And on our souls there falls ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For • Various

... applied himself from the outset to restore, as far as he was able, the material and moral forces of his kingdom. Assur-bani-pal, on his side, met with no opposition from his subjects, but prudence cautioned him not to estrange them; the troubles of the preceding year were perhaps not so completely suppressed as to prevent the chiefs who had escaped punishment from being encouraged by the change of sovereign to renew their intrigues. The king, ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 8 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... attended in time with very ill consequences; as the method of proceeding therein is entirely in derogation of the common law; and their large discretionary powers create a petty tyranny in a set of standing commissioners; and as the disuse of the trial by jury may tend to estrange the minds of the people from that valuable prerogative of Englishmen, which has already been more than sufficiently excluded in many instances. How much rather is it to be wished that the proceedings in the ...
— An Essay on the Trial By Jury • Lysander Spooner

... moondawn of Maytime, A star in the cloudland of change; Too splendid and sad for the daytime To cheer or eclipse or estrange; Too sweet for tradition or vision To see but through shadows of tears Rise deathless across the division Of ...
— Astrophel and Other Poems - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne, Vol. VI • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... O, if thou lov'st him still, all hope forsake! In one day can he two conversions make? Not this the Christians' mould: they never change; His heart is fixed—past power of man to estrange. This is no poison quaffed all unawares, What martyrs do and dare—that Polyeucte dares; He saw the lure by which he was enticed, He thinks the universe well lost for Christ. I know the breed; I know their courage high, They love the cross,—so, for ...
— Polyuecte • Pierre Corneille

... Woman's whole existence; Man may range The Court, Camp, Church, the Vessel, and the Mart; Sword, Gown, Gain, Glory, offer in exchange Pride, Fame, Ambition, to fill up his heart, And few there are whom these can not estrange; Men have all these resources, We but one,[84] To love again, ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 6 • Lord Byron

... with which Egerton had first heard of his visit to Hazeldean, he thought that he was indeed near the secret which Edward desired to conceal from him and from all—viz., the incognito of the Italian whom Lord l'Estrange had ...
— The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 5, No. 1, January, 1852 • Various

... encomium, endue, enervate, enfilade, enigmatic, ennui, enunciate, environ, epicure, epigram, episode, epistolary, epitome, equestrian, equilibrium, equinoctial, equity, equivocate, eradicate, erosion, erotic, erudition, eruptive, eschew, esoteric, espousal, estrange, ethereal, eulogistic, euphonious, evanescent, evangelical, evict, exacerbate, excerpt, excommunicate, excoriate, excruciate, execrable, exegesis, exemplary, exhalation, exhilarate, exigency, exodus, exonerate, exorbitant, exotic, expectorate, expeditious, explicable, ...
— The Century Vocabulary Builder • Creever & Bachelor

... well as of the pachas subordinate to him; how they had alienated the public mind, how they had succeeded in offending the Armatolis, and especially the Suliots, who might be brought back to their duty with less trouble than these imprudent chiefs had taken to estrange them. He gave a mass of special information on this subject, and explained that in advising the Suliots to retire to their mountains he had really only put them in a false position as long as he retained possession of the fort of Kiapha, which is ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... Catholic policy, but had intended all along to effect this great change.[86] Ayamonte carried his congratulations to Paris, and pretended that his master had been in the secret. It suited Philip that this should be believed by Protestant princes, in order to estrange them still more from France; but he wrote on the margin of Ayamonte's instructions, that it was uncertain how long previously the purpose had subsisted.[87] Juan and Diego de Zuniga, his ambassadors at Rome and at Paris, were convinced that the long display of enmity to Spain was genuine, ...
— The History of Freedom • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... bragg'd of any learning. But having integrity enough, not to desire to be taken for what I was not, I thought that I ought to endeavour by all means to render my self worthy of the reputation which was given me. And 'tis now eight years since this desire made me resolve to estrange my self from all places where I might have any acquaintance, and so retire my self hither in a Country where the long continuance of the warre hath established such orders, that the Armies which are intertain'd there, seem to serve onely to make the inhabitants enjoy the fruits ...
— A Discourse of a Method for the Well Guiding of Reason - and the Discovery of Truth in the Sciences • Rene Descartes

... people of the same age and sex; many of which friendships are formed at school and college, and which often fade away in a sort of cordial glow, implying no particular communion of life and thought. Marriage is often the great divorcer of such friendships, and circumstances generally, which sever and estrange; because, unless there is a constant interchange of thought and ideas, increasing age tends to emphasise differences. But there are instances of men, like Newman and FitzGerald, who kept up a sort of romantic quality ...
— At Large • Arthur Christopher Benson

... upon Mr. Moore's showing L'Estrange Captain Ferrers's letter, did do my Lord Sandwich great right as ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 37. Saturday, July 13, 1850 • Various

... thought and feeling dear Thrice-precious ever in the Christian's ear! An earthly father, trials may estrange; THE EVERLASTING FATHER knows no change!— With tireless patience and unslumbering care, Watching wherever His earth-children are, Nor failing e'en the faintest cry to hear, By His weak children breathed ...
— Poems of the Heart and Home • Mrs. J.C. Yule (Pamela S. Vining)

... which happened in 1875 helped to estrange Germany from Russia. As was previously said, Bismarck was astonished and alarmed when he saw how quickly France was getting over the effects of the war. In 1875, some trouble came up again between France and Germany, and Bismarck a second time planned to make war on the republic and—complete ...
— The World War and What was Behind It - The Story of the Map of Europe • Louis P. Benezet

... were first lectured was Tully's Offices, and one morning Hoadly received a compliment from the tutor for the excellence of his construing. Sherlock, a little vexed at the preference shown to his rival, said, when they left the lecture-room, "Ben, you made good use of L'Estrange's translation to-day."—"Why, no, Tom," retorted Hoadly, "I did not, for I had not got one; and I forgot to borrow yours, which, I am told, is the only one in ...
— The Jest Book - The Choicest Anecdotes and Sayings • Mark Lemon

... and quiet in her joy, though she was resolved to be discreet, and knew that there were circumstances in her engagement which would for a while deter her from being with her accepted lover as other girls are with theirs, did not mean to estrange herself from her cousin George. If she were to do so, how was she to assist, and take, as she hoped to do, the first part in that task of refining the gold on which they were all now intent? She was to correspond ...
— Sir Harry Hotspur of Humblethwaite • Anthony Trollope

... hold out until the sand had ceased to run. If, on the other hand, he exceeded that limit, his audience would signify by gapes and yawns that they had had as much spiritual food as they could digest. Sir Roger L'Estrange (Fables, Part II. Fab. 262) tells of a notorious spin-text who, having exhausted his glass and being half-way through a second one, was at last arrested in his career by a valiant sexton, who rose and departed, remarking as he did so, ...
— Micah Clarke - His Statement as made to his three Grandchildren Joseph, - Gervas and Reuben During the Hard Winter of 1734 • Arthur Conan Doyle

... collections. They form a race of authors unknown to most readers of these times: the names of some of their chiefs, however, have reached us, and in the minor chronicle of domestic literature I rank three notable heroes; Marchmont Needham, Sir John Birkenhead, and Sir Roger L'Estrange. ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 1 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli



Words linked to "Estrange" :   modify, alien, change, alienate, wean, alter, drift away, estrangement, move out, take out



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