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Class   Listen
verb
Class  v. t.  (past & past part. classed; pres. part. classing)  
1.
To arrange in classes; to classify or refer to some class; as, to class words or passages. Note: In scientific arrangement, to classify is used instead of to class.
2.
To divide into classes, as students; to form into, or place in, a class or classes.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Class" Quotes from Famous Books



... let me pull out a tooth.' The monk struggled: 'Never, never!' he exclaimed. The student turned with great coolness toward the bystanders, who were all laughing in their sleeves. 'My friends,' (he addressed crippled travellers, mountain-brigands, and poor people of every class,) 'my friends, for the love of God, who suffered, come and hold this good father: I do not want him ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 5, No. 3, March, 1852 • Various

... by single orders, they are in the following proportions:—Bats, four species, of which only one (Vespertilio innoxius, Gerv.) belongs to this region alone. Beasts of prey, ten kinds; among them one of the mephitic class, known to the natives by the name of zorillo, or anash; an otter (Lutra chilensis, Ben.); a fox (Canis azarae, Pr. Max.), which abounds in the cotton plantations in the neighborhood of Lima and throughout all the Lomas, where he preys on the lambs; several of the feline race, among ...
— Travels in Peru, on the Coast, in the Sierra, Across the Cordilleras and the Andes, into the Primeval Forests • J. J. von Tschudi

... professing Christian to self-examination—Am I of the raven class, or that of the dove? May my heart, while trembling at the thought that there are ravens in the church, appeal to the heart-searching God, ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... Your new three-shilling ball, And, best saving of all, If you carry your clubs, You can pay heavy "subs.," Fees for entrance and greens, Without straining your means, And, though you're a middle- Class man, not a peer, Agree with LORD RIDDELL That golf ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 159, December 15, 1920 • Various

... them any more,' or, in more modern language, panic laid hold of the enemy, and they could not pluck up courage to oppose the advance of Israel. If we add this result to those mentioned in chapter in., we find sufficient motive for the miracle to take it out of the class of purposeless, legendary wonders. Given the importance of Israel as the depositaries of revelation, there is nothing unreasonable in a miracle which so powerfully contributed to their conquest of Canaan, and we have ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... those who loved one another, I am beginning to realise that the world was a finer place in war time. It mingled the classes as they have never been mingled before, for the untold benefit of every class, it brought out that spirit of kindness and self-sacrifice which was the most really Christian thing that the world has seen on such a large scale since the beginning of Christianity; it seemed to give a meaning to life, and to ...
— Over the Fireside with Silent Friends • Richard King

... unexpectedly that one of our own class, a man closely allied to us by his intellectual development and a number of ways and customs, had actually lived for three years in a yurta not much better situated than the one behind the imaginary town of Zaszyversk. ...
— Selected Polish Tales • Various

... discovered their mistake? These were the main questions, but there were others also arising in mind. This did not seem to me like an ordinary party of troopers; there was an offhand freedom from discipline totally unlike the British service. Neither Peter nor the Indian seemed to belong to the class with which the army was recruited. Peter appeared more like a well-trained servant, and his riding was atrocious. And the lieutenant! There came back to me the haunting memory that he had joined Delavan as a volunteer—the Dragoon ...
— My Lady of Doubt • Randall Parrish

... bridges or tunnels, but whose activities were always concerned with material things. His face was lean and bronzed—the face of a man who lived much in the outdoors. His nose was aquiline, and his lips, though thin and firm, were not unkindly. In fact, here was a man who, in the class-room, might be given to quips with his students, rather than to sternness. Yet this was the man of whom it was said.... Lowell's face grew stern as the long list of indictments against Willis Morgan, recluse and "squaw professor," came to ...
— Mystery Ranch • Arthur Chapman

... to say that this present trouble is not a quarrel born within the memory of any living man. The colonial life began with colonial differences and aversions due to religion—Puritan, Quaker and Church of England, intercolonial tariffs and what not. For the planter-class we were mere traders; they for us were men too lightly presumed to live an idle life of gambling, sport and hard drinking—a life foreign to ours. The colonies were to one another like foreign countries. In the Revolution you may read clearly the effect of these opinions, when Washington ...
— Westways • S. Weir Mitchell

... set in a vast number of tongues; this is done for the reason that very few foreign nations among whom the book will circulate can read in any language but their own; whereas we do not write for a particular class or sect or nation, but to take in the ...
— The Gilded Age, Part 1. • Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) and Charles Dudley Warner

... relief from her professional fatigues, comes to the knowledge of the intended excursion of our party; hears that several of the ladies concerned are in an interesting situation; and decides to accompany the party unbeknown, in a second-class carriage—'in case.' There, she finds a gentleman from the Strand in a checked suit, who is going down with the wigs"—the theatrical hair-dresser employed on these occasions, Mr. Wilson, had eccentric points of character that were a fund of infinite mirth ...
— The Life of Charles Dickens, Vol. I-III, Complete • John Forster

... anyone, and we smile and smile, though we dislike each other, and though the Ramper hardly knows what to make of me. When I first made his acquaintance we were on our way to a race meeting, and he proposed to give me his company. Like all of his class, he knew many "certainties," and he offered, with engaging frankness, to put me in the way of "gittin' a bit." The racing blackguard never talks of money; indeed, his obliquity of mind prevents him from ...
— The Chequers - Being the Natural History of a Public-House, Set Forth in - a Loafer's Diary • James Runciman

... were loyally enthusiastic over their boss's grit and resourcefulness, their camp's order, their cook's good "grub." As they were authorities, others perforce had to accept the dictum. There grew a desire among the better class to see what Thorpe's "One" might be like. In the autumn Harry had more applicants than he knew what to do with. Eighteen of the old men returned. He took them all, but when it came to distribution, three ...
— The Blazed Trail • Stewart Edward White

... of Europe from the days of Greece and Rome to the colonization of America. The wealth of pertinent illustrations adds to the interest and value of the book, and the open, attractive type page makes easy reading. Teachers will find the material well arranged for class purposes, each section being of suitable length for one lesson and fully provided with helps in the way of suggestive questions and references for further reading ...
— Heroes of the Middle West - The French • Mary Hartwell Catherwood

... he said gruffly. "Who's running this dynasty—you or I? Come!" With the assistance of Fritz he tied up my face with a handkerchief to simulate toothache, and then, with a shout of defiance, we three rushed madly into a closely packed third-class carriage. ...
— New Burlesques • Bret Harte

... you from the platform and when a "number" of any kind is being given, but also during a "movie." People who visit while others are trying to entertain them are a public nuisance. Don't let yourselves slip into that class. Also do not tell the plot of a play or a ...
— Manners And Conduct In School And Out • Anonymous

... mighty fine tipple," he said. "Waiter, give me another tumbler of champagne. In my chequered career I don't often run up against this class of lotion. The worst of it is, it makes one talk too fast, and seeing that I have got to run the gauntlet with the next ...
— The Mystery of the Four Fingers • Fred M. White

... ride more on horseback than they now do, we should hear less of crooked spines and of round shoulders, of chlorosis and of hysteria, and of other numerous diseases of that class, owing, generally, to ...
— Advice to a Mother on the Management of her Children • Pye Henry Chavasse

... existed upon the earth, and probably form but a minute percentage of them. In the second place, the remains of man's ancestor have not been sought for in its native locality, the tropical regions. In the third place, man belongs to the class of animals least likely to be preserved in the fossil state, since they dwell in the depths of forests and at a distance from the lakes and streams in whose muddy bottoms the remains of so many animals have been ...
— Man And His Ancestor - A Study In Evolution • Charles Morris

... Cambridge, some fifty years ago, my informant being present. A youth of undue aspirations was giving a proposition, and at last said, "Let E F be produced to 'L':" "Not quite so far, Mr. ——," said the lecturer, quietly, to the great amusement of the class, and the utter astonishment of the aspirant, who knew no more than a Tractarian the tendency of ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume II (of II) • Augustus de Morgan

... who had submitted to their discretion, were ordered to evacuate their houses, and to assemble in some plain adjacent to the city; where a division was made of the vanquished into three parts. The first class consisted of the soldiers of the garrison, and of the young men capable of bearing arms; and their fate was instantly decided they were either enlisted among the Moguls, or they were massacred on the spot by the troops, who, with pointed spears and bended ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 3 • Edward Gibbon

... you call ships. Superdreadnoughts, Perseus class, six. First-line battleships, twenty-nine. Second-line, smaller and some pretty old, seventy-three. Counting everything armed that will hold air, something ...
— Masters of Space • Edward Elmer Smith

... slow, hence one was called the "Telegraph" and others by appropriate names of which I recollect best "West Australian" and the "Flying Dutchman." About forty years ago there were eight young and rising players nearly approaching first class, they were S. S. Boden, the Rev. W. Audrey, Captain Cunningham, G. W. Medley, J. Medley, C. T. Smith, A. Simons and H. E. Bird. Three of these, remarkable for ingenuity and sudden surprises had familiar appellations. One was termed "The Snake," another that "Old Serpent," ...
— Chess History and Reminiscences • H. E. Bird

... become so widespread, permeating every class and condition of society, even from the sacred desk to the hovel, we hail with gratitude to God the many indications of the revival in the interest of temperance reform which exists in various portions of our country, and especially ...
— Two Decades - A History of the First Twenty Years' Work of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union of the State of New York • Frances W. Graham and Georgeanna M. Gardenier

... name of the law," as if they had been authorized by the heads of the people to arrest us. This band consisted of boys, led on to commit disorders by a set of idle, good-for-nothing persons, of the worst class, who had armed themselves with sabres, and were disguised with old cocked hats; trying thus to show their bravery over those who would make no resistance. But the hairs of our head are all numbered; nor have they been permitted ...
— Fox's Book of Martyrs - Or A History of the Lives, Sufferings, and Triumphant - Deaths of the Primitive Protestant Martyrs • John Fox

... strong specimen of a class of men by whom all accessible persons who have made any name in science are hunted. It is a pity that they cannot be admitted into scientific societies, and allowed fairly to state their cases, and stand quiet cross-examination, being kept in their answers very ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume I (of II) • Augustus De Morgan

... Abe," Morris Perlmutter declared hotly, one morning in December; "an elegant class of people lives in the houses. On the same floor with me lives Harry Baskof, which he is just married a daughter of Maisener & Finkman. You remember Max Finkman, for years a salesman for B. Senft & Co. Downstairs is a lawyer, a young feller by ...
— Abe and Mawruss - Being Further Adventures of Potash and Perlmutter • Montague Glass

... printed in the Supplement to the History of Reading, from the original prefixed to the Woollascot manuscripts. But it is copied very inaccurately, and with many grievous omissions; nevertheless it will suffice to enable us to gain a knowledge of the class of books most admired by the monks of Reading; and the Christian reader will be glad to learn that the catalogue opens, as usual, with the Holy Scriptures. Indeed no less than four fine large and complete copies of the Bible are enumerated. ...
— Bibliomania in the Middle Ages • Frederick Somner Merryweather

... smaller class of religious writers that may be called mock-eloquent writers. They try at a superior style, but forget that true eloquence resides essentially in the thought, the feeling, the character, and that no words can make genuine eloquence out of that which is of no worth or interest. They mistake ...
— Modern Skepticism: A Journey Through the Land of Doubt and Back Again - A Life Story • Joseph Barker

... with a full heart that to this latter class do I belong. After one gelid moment, spent with eyes and mouth agape, my hands fallen limp beside me and my hair bristling with affright, I became myself again and never calmer than in that dread moment. I went to work with superhuman swiftness. My cheeks may have been livid, my very lips bloodless; ...
— The Shame of Motley • Raphael Sabatini

... vulnerability to private censorship in a context where content-based discrimination is not otherwise permitted"). Compare Forbes, 523 U.S. at 679 (holding that the state does not create a public forum when it "allows selective access for individual speakers rather than general access for a class of speakers") (emphasis added), with Police Dep't of the City of Chicago v. Mosley, 408 U.S. 92, 96 (1972) ("Selective exclusions from a public forum may not be based on content alone, and may not be justified by reference ...
— Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) Ruling • United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania

... alone, engaged a deck chair, and taken a look over the ship—which was new, and as handsome as much oak, fragrant cedar-wood, gilding, and green brocade could make her—many other passengers were coming on board. Travelling first class were several slim French officers, and stout Frenchmen of the commercial class; a merry theatrical company going to act in Algiers and Tunis; an English clergyman of grave aspect; invalids with their nurses, and two or three dignified ...
— The Golden Silence • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... wins will stand a chance of having her head completely turned," said Miriam. "If she is a senior, her class will bankrupt themselves entertaining her, and if she belongs to one of the other classes, her own class will probably prostrate themselves at her feet in a body, not to mention the general adulation that is bound to come to ...
— Grace Harlowe's Fourth Year at Overton College • Jessie Graham Flower

... revised General Folder is issued regularly every month. This publication gives condensed through time tables; through car service; a first-class map of the United States, west of Chicago and St. Louis; important baggage and ticket regulations of the Union Pacific Railway, thus making a valuable compendium for the traveler and for ticket agent in selling through tickets over the Union ...
— Oregon, Washington and Alaska; Sights and Scenes for the Tourist • E. L. Lomax

... cannot abandon their ideas without abdicating their position. Hence the fierceness with which they have put forth, and advocated with all their strength, opinions that never were held by any other class of man-owners, and which would have been scouted in Barbary even in those days when religious animosity added additional venom to the feelings of the Mussulmans toward their Christian captives, ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, Issue 45, July, 1861 • Various

... write," came out to watch the horse-breaking. This time, introduced to Mrs. Langworthy, Lee got for his bow a remarkably cold stare. Others might forget, here in the open, the distinction between people of the better class and their servants—not Mrs. ...
— Judith of Blue Lake Ranch • Jackson Gregory

... passing successive mugs of the landlord's ale from one to the other, they grew more and more conversational; and, as I put in a question here and there, they gave me an insight into the general condition, aspects and prospects of their class which I had not obtained before. They were quite free to answer any questions relating to their domestic economy, their earnings, spendings, food, drink, clothing, housing and fuel, also in reference to their educational and religious privileges ...
— A Walk from London to John O'Groat's • Elihu Burritt

... phrase, 'break out threescore thousand strong' in youth; nor with those who begin original composition betimes, and by degrees arrive at excellence; nor yet with those who do not display any aptitude for letters till late in life. His class—a fourth, which, at least as regards the greater names of literature, is perhaps the smallest of all—comprises those who may almost be said to drift into literary work and literary fame, whose first production is not merely tentative and ...
— Sir Walter Scott - Famous Scots Series • George Saintsbury

... Charlie were given gas masks and shown how to use them. They were also each provided with an automatic pistol and were given uniforms. For they had to be on the firing line and on such occasions were not really of the non-combatant class, though they were not supposed to take part in the fighting unless it ...
— The Moving Picture Boys on the War Front - Or, The Hunt for the Stolen Army Films • Victor Appleton

... a sound maxim, if not first-class poetry. If Mr. Arnot, the husband of your old friend, is willing to take him, you cannot do better than place your son in his charge, for he is one of the most methodical and successful business men ...
— A Knight Of The Nineteenth Century • E. P. Roe

... in the last volume, when justice overtakes him and honest folks come by their own. There never was perhaps a greatly popular story but this simple plot was carried through it: mere satiric wit is addressed to a class of readers and thinkers quite different to those simple souls who laugh and weep over the novel. I fancy very few ladies indeed, for instance, could be brought to like Gulliver heartily, and (putting the coarseness and difference of manners out of the question) to relish the wonderful ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... unseen we might not accept their interpretation of what is right and wrong. But with the assurance that their advice is backed up by Deity, followed with an offer of reward if we believe it, and a threat of dire punishment if we do not, the Self-appointed Superior Class has driven men wheresoever it willed. The evolution of formal religions is not a complex process, and the fact that they embody these two unmixable things, dogma and morality, is a very plain and simple truth, easily seen, undisputed by all reasonable men. And be it said ...
— Love, Life & Work • Elbert Hubbard

... passions. The bust is "animated," and the temple, though built of marble, and by man, is called "religious." Art appeals to every cultivated mind, and excites poetic feelings. It is impressive even to every order, class, and condition of men, not, perhaps, in its severest forms, since the taste must be cultivated to appreciate its higher beauties, but to a certain extent. The pyramids and the granite image temples of Egypt must have filled ...
— The Old Roman World • John Lord

... its tale, and little remains to explain. Philip Beaufort was one of those men of whom there are many in his peculiar class of society—easy, thoughtless, good-humoured, generous, with feelings infinitely better ...
— Night and Morning, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... being buried. I hope I shall not always be a prisoner in these woods. And I grow more and more resentful against that preacher for giving my father a jolt that made a recluse of him. Don't you see? That one thing has colored my personal attitude toward preachers as a class. I can never meet a minister without thinking of that episode which has kept me here where I never see another white woman, and very seldom a man. It's really a weak spot in me, holding a grudge like that. One wouldn't ...
— Burned Bridges • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... pleased with the promise of the smart light-weight, "Quickfire," who seems to have in him the makings of a fine fighter. Mr. B-LL did not disguise his disgust at the feeble figure cut by the "Whopper," about whose pretensions to first-class form, let alone Champion honours, it is to be hoped we shall hear little ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100. March 7, 1891. • Various

... formerly the kingdom belonged. These people acknowledge one God in three persons, and worship the blessed Virgin, a doctrine which they have preserved ever since the time of the apostles[194]. The fourth and last class of inhabitants are the Mahometans called Lauteas, consisting both of strangers who have conquered the country, and natives who have embraced that religion. The inhabitants of Guzerat are very ingenious mechanics in works of silk, gold, ivory, ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VI - Early English Voyages Of Discovery To America • Robert Kerr

... semicircles, before four chairs, placed at the four tables; all held books in their hands, and a great book, like a Bible, lay on each table, before the vacant seat. A pause of some seconds succeeded, filled up by the low, vague hum of numbers; Miss Miller walked from class to ...
— Jane Eyre - an Autobiography • Charlotte Bronte

... heavy-shouldered man with a bad mouth—a greedy mouth, one would think—and mild eyes. The month was September, and the professor wore a thin black overcoat closely buttoned across his broad chest. He carried a pair of slate-coloured gloves and an umbrella. His whole appearance bespoke learning and middle-class respectability. It is, after all, no use being learned without looking learned, and Professor von Holzen took care to dress according to his station in life. His attitude towards the world seemed to say, "Leave me alone and I will not trouble you," which ...
— Roden's Corner • Henry Seton Merriman

... destroyed in monarchs' minds any poor germs of philanthropy which had ever found lodgement there. Still Alexander breasted this storm; found time to plan for his serfs, and in 1803 put his hand to the work of helping them toward freedom. His first edict was for the creation of the class of "free laborers." By this, masters and serfs were encouraged to enter into an arrangement which was to put the serf into immediate possession of himself, of a homestead and of a few acres, giving him time to indemnify his master by a series of payments. Alexander threw his heart ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 17 • Charles Francis Horne

... mouth as she spoke. Her sister Katharine was by far the best botanist in her class, and was always tearing up flowers in the most wasteful manner. Worse than that, she expected Edith to do the same thing and learn the hard names of the ...
— Jimmy, Lucy, and All • Sophie May

... avoided without changing the general condition. Wage increases, price increases, profit increases, other kinds of increases designed to bring more money here or money there, are only attempts of this or that class to get out of the fire—regardless of what may happen to everyone else. There is a foolish belief that if only the money can be gotten, somehow the storm can be weathered. Labour believes that if it can get more wages, it can weather the storm. Capital thinks that if it can get more profits, ...
— My Life and Work • Henry Ford

... favorite with all hands; and even Mr. Brewster, who at first looked upon my advent on board with an unfavorable eye, was forced to acknowledge that I no more resembled a ship's cousin than a Methodist class-leader does ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII. No. 3. March 1848 • Various

... was "the horrid woman" arrayed as nearly after her fashion as Gibbie had been able to get her up! A very good "get-up" nevertheless it was, and satisfactory to both concerned. Mistress Croale went out a decent-looking poor body, and entered a not uncomely matron of the housekeeper class, rather agreeable to look upon, who had just stood a nerve-shaking but not unpleasant surprise, and was recovering. Gibbie was so satisfied with her appearance that, come of age as he was, and vagrant no more, he first ...
— Sir Gibbie • George MacDonald

... Friday evenings in the shop, with their basket making and pleasant talk. Miss Virginia had been accustomed to accept things as they were. When in her very infrequent visits to business offices she had encountered young women acting as bookkeepers and stenographers, she had looked upon them as a class apart. Not that she felt consciously superior, or anything but kindly, but simply that her life and theirs did not touch. She was actually surprised to find Norah's friend Louise Martin so much like other girls, and when Norah described the hall bedroom in the gloomy boarding-house, which was her ...
— The Pleasant Street Partnership - A Neighborhood Story • Mary F. Leonard

... gentleman next door, Sara," Lottie whispered at the French class afterward. "Do you think he is a Chinee? The geography says the Chinee men ...
— A Little Princess • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... the husband of three queens [537]. Another favourite was Harpocras, to whom he granted the privilege of being carried in a litter within the city, and of holding public spectacles for the entertainment of the people. In this class was likewise Polybius, who assisted him in his studies, and had often the honour of walking between the two consuls. But above all others, Narcissus, his secretary, and Pallas [538], the comptroller of his accounts, were in high favour with him. He not only allowed them to receive, by decree ...
— The Lives Of The Twelve Caesars, Complete - To Which Are Added, His Lives Of The Grammarians, Rhetoricians, And Poets • C. Suetonius Tranquillus

... chase, characterized by every aspect of first-class trailing, and carried along at such a speed that the quarry never got a chance to stop and get its second wind. Indeed, the quarry never had a chance to stop at all, until it was stopped, and the manner of ...
— The Way of the Wild • F. St. Mars

... of the women must hold the balance straight, especially if, as is said, they exceed us in point of numbers. This leaves a little margin for those of them who profess the same freedom of thought as is generally accorded to men—a class, I must add, which I abominate from the bottom ...
— A Beleaguered City • Mrs. Oliphant

... claims of the Church are true no inquiry can injure them. They say, "Oh, well, drop all the bad part, and only take the good. There is a great deal of good in it too." But if I don't know what is good myself I won't go to Moses and that class of men to find out. I'll go to somebody who has got a clean record. I won't go to men who robbed and murdered in the name of God; I won't go to men who bought and sold their fellow-men; I won't go to ...
— Men, Women, and Gods - And Other Lectures • Helen H. Gardener

... much better than, ever it did before. In that day, however, let us hope that—the more communal conception of public life having prevailed and come to its own—the success of Trade, among any nation or people, will no longer mean the successful manufacture of a dominant and vulgar class, but the real prosperity and welfare of the whole nation, ...
— The Healing of Nations and the Hidden Sources of Their Strife • Edward Carpenter

... No, no! The Kid is as decent a little chap as you'd meet anywhere. And right up in the championship class, too! He's matched against Eddie Wood at this very moment. And Mr. Waterman will support me in my statement that a victory over Eddie Wood means that he gets a cast-iron claim to meet Jimmy ...
— The Prince and Betty - (American edition) • P. G. Wodehouse

... polite and kind to all, and particularly to those whom the chance of birth has placed in a lower class than their own, and also to respect age, and never to mock at the physical or moral ...
— Self Mastery Through Conscious Autosuggestion • Emile Coue

... Paddington May 7, 1847. In the left compartment of a certain first-class carriage were four passengers; of these two were worth description. The lady had a smooth, white, delicate brow, strongly marked eyebrows, long lashes, eyes that seemed to change colour, and a good-sized, delicious mouth, with teeth as white as milk. A man could not see her nose for her eyes ...
— Stories by English Authors: England • Various

... miners. Sidney, be sure to ask some questions about the machinery, and whether they're all happy and comfortable. And do it tactfully, because I've always heard miners are such a very independent and intelligent class." ...
— In Brief Authority • F. Anstey

... means of pacification. Thus the honor of the Crown may yet be saved. To-morrow it will be too late." The King's answer was to declare Paris under a state of siege. The so-called "Great Week," or "three days' revolution," had begun. The bourgeoisie or middle class and all the students joined the revolt. Before nightfall 600 barricades blocked the streets of Paris. Every house became a fortress. "Where do the rebels get their powder?" asked the King in astonishment. "From the soldiers," was the ...
— A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year - Volume Two (of Three) • Edwin Emerson

... had lived from hand to mouth. He belonged to the class that despises its neighbours for pinching and scraping, and yet is haunted by the idea of sudden riches falling into its lap from the skies. Certainly Chook had given Fortune no excuse for neglecting him. He was always in ...
— Jonah • Louis Stone

... every thirty persons! Need we wonder at the character of the machinery, the poverty and slavery of the people, the trivial amount of commerce, or at the weakness of a government whose whole system looks to the exhaustion of the land, and to the exclusion of that great middle class of working-men, to whom the agriculturist has everywhere been indebted ...
— The trade, domestic and foreign • Henry Charles Carey

... a good time watching Abe during the class in "Manners." Once a week Master Crawford had them practice being ladies and gentlemen. One scholar would pretend to be a stranger who had just arrived in Pigeon Creek. He would leave the schoolhouse, come back, and knock at the door. ...
— Abe Lincoln Gets His Chance • Frances Cavanah

... worthy of note that the amounts bestowed on this deserving class were in excess of the sums meted out to ordinary "travellers." It is also a fact that, while mention is often made of Oxford scholars, the reverse is the case with Cambridge men. On referring to Willis and Clark's "History of the University of Cambridge" we find that although notices occur ...
— The Customs of Old England • F. J. Snell

... was innocent of paint. She was grimed and shellacked with dirt and grease, and smelled abominably. Her crew were Chinamen; but such Chinamen! The coolies of the "Bertha Millner" were pampered and effete in comparison. The beach-combers, thirteen in number, were a smaller class of men, their faces almost black with tan and dirt. Though they still wore the queue, their heads were not shaven, and mats and mops of stiff black hair fell over their eyes from under their ...
— Moran of the Lady Letty • Frank Norris

... with a gentleman fighting a rowdy, the gentleman has all to lose and nothing to gain. If you don't live among your own class, Peter, your life will simmer down to ...
— Birthright - A Novel • T.S. Stribling

... I settled down And thought to find a cure By writing books and plays and sich, That class as litrachoor. ...
— The So-called Human Race • Bert Leston Taylor

... net-handkerchiefs tied round their heads so as to look exactly like the ancient Greek head-dress with a double fillet—the very prettiest and neatest coiffure I ever saw. The gowns were made like those of English girls of the same class, but far smarter, cleaner, and gayer in colour—pink, and green, and yellow, and bright blue; several were all in white, with white gloves. The men and women sit separate, and the women's side was a ...
— Letters from the Cape • Lady Duff Gordon

... transferred to the head of physiology. The phrenologist is admitted into the hierarchy of science as an honest, though hitherto an unpractised, and not very successful labourer; the metaphysician, with his class of internal observations, is entirely scouted. M. Comte considers the mind as one of those abstract entities which it is the first business of the positive philosophy to discard. He speaks of man, of his organization, of his thought, but not, scientifically, of his mind. This entity, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXIX. - March, 1843, Vol. LIII. • Various

... no doubt that poets, as a class, have acknowledged the obligation of proving that their lives are pure. But the effectiveness of their statements has been largely dissipated by the fact that their voices have been almost drowned by the clamor of a small coterie which finds its chief ...
— The Poet's Poet • Elizabeth Atkins

... governors appointed to preside over these two departments of state are not one and the same. But one class governs the inhabitants proper including the workers of the soil, and collects the tribute from them, another is in command of the armed garrisons. If the commandant [9] protects the country insufficiently, the civil governor of the population, ...
— The Economist • Xenophon

... To this class belongs the interesting phenomenon that we very frequently meet fools who never do anything foolish. It is not true that these are simply misjudged, and only appear to be foolish. They are really foolish but they are helped by certain conditions in every instance of their conduct. ...
— Robin Hood • J. Walker McSpadden

... down, have cheerfully added their testimony to the worth and excellence of this magnificent Confession—the first since the Athanasian Creed. A late writer of this class says of it that "it best exhibits the prevailing genius of the German Reformation, and will ever be cherished as one of the noblest monuments of faith from the pentecostal period ...
— Luther and the Reformation: - The Life-Springs of Our Liberties • Joseph A. Seiss

... any kind. As to what you say about some voices appearing to be familiar, don't you think that has something to do with classes of men? No man, I think, is a solitary unit in creation. Every man is, as it were, the type of a class to which he belongs—each member possessing more or less the complexion, tendencies, characteristics, tones, etcetera, of his particular class. You are familiar, it may be, with the tones of the class to which I ...
— The Eagle Cliff • R.M. Ballantyne

... their equals. [141] In the conquest and settlement of new cities, the example of Jerusalem was imitated by the kings and their great vassals; and above thirty similar corporations were founded before the loss of the Holy Land. Another class of subjects, the Syrians, [142] or Oriental Christians, were oppressed by the zeal of the clergy, and protected by the toleration of the state. Godfrey listened to their reasonable prayer, that they might be judged by their own national ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 5 • Edward Gibbon

... caste of priests, which is separated from all the others; next there are the artificers, who exercise their several crafts by themselves, and without admixture of any other; and also there is the class of shepherds and that of hunters, as well as that of husbandmen; and you will observe, too, that the warriors in Egypt are separated from all the other classes, and are commanded by the law only to engage in war; moreover, ...
— The Antediluvian World • Ignatius Donnelly

... many besides myself who turn over that terrible problem as despairingly as you can ever do. As far as in us lies, we strive to remedy its evil; the uttermost effort can do but little, but that little is only lessened—fearfully lessened—whenever Class is arrayed against Class by that blind ...
— Under Two Flags • Ouida [Louise de la Ramee]

... whilst a little beyond a few more were burning the bush, and looking out for game and snakes. It does not often fall to the lot of the white man to behold the wild people of the earth, engaged in their daily avocations, completely unconscious that the gaze of a superior class of beings is upon them. We have seen savages exhibited to us professedly in all the simplicity of the woods; but how can the children of nature retain their freedom of action and manners under the curious gaze of a civilized multitude? We may depend ...
— Discoveries in Australia, Volume 2 • John Lort Stokes

... had matriculated in the school of experience, and he entered in the freshman class. He first wrote a series of articles dealing with the historical development of the drama. He took them to the Munsey offices and offered them to ...
— Bambi • Marjorie Benton Cooke

... doses,—and he would undoubtedly have applied both of these in Gilbert's case, but for the latter's great anxiety to be in the saddle and on the hunt of his enemy. He stoutly refused to be bled, and the Doctor had learned, from long observation, that patients of a certain class must be humored rather than coerced. So he administered a double dose of Dover's Powders, and prohibited the drinking of cold water. His report was, on the whole, reassuring to Mary Potter. Provided his directions were strictly followed, ...
— The Story Of Kennett • Bayard Taylor

... answered Father Somazzo. "I wanted you to look upon this as a sacrifice which you were willing to make, but since you will not, I command you to remain at home, for a reason which I cannot tell you. Come, Peppo, into the class-room. You may take my big picture-book with all the pictures of European cities and churches, ladies and gentlemen in fine clothes and battles and ships. The time will pass quickly. Come and win the ...
— The Shipwreck - A Story for the Young • Joseph Spillman

... high combs. A youth in green velvet jacket and orange trousers, whose wonderful dancing did him credit as Otero's prize pupil, took part with them; he had the square-jawed, high-cheek-boned face of the lower-class Spaniard, and they the oval of all Spanish women. Here there was no mere posturing and contortioning among the girls as with the gipsies; they sprang like flames and stamped the floor with joyous detonations of their slippers. It was their ...
— Familiar Spanish Travels • W. D. Howells

... manuscript note-books a copy of verses, undated, entitled The World of Dreams, which his son printed in subsequent editions of the poems. The verses are in the same metre and rhyme-system as Sir Eustace, and treat of precisely the same class of visions as recorded by the inmate of the asylum. The rapid and continuous transition from scene to scene, and period to period, is the same in both. Foreign kings and other potentates reappear, as with De Quincey, ...
— Crabbe, (George) - English Men of Letters Series • Alfred Ainger

... could have charts," said Rob, "it was necessary for some one to discover things all over the world. I suppose that's the class we're in now—we're the first navigators, so far as help from any one else is concerned. In Alaska a fellow has to take care of himself, and he has to learn to take his medicine. Now none of us is ...
— The Young Alaskans • Emerson Hough

... of his country, and decrease the value of his own fortune. They alleged that the salt-tax particularly affected the poor, who could not afford to eat fresh provisions; and that, as it formerly occasioned murmurs and discontents among the lower class of people, the revival of it would, in all probability, exasperate them into open sedition. They observed, that while it was exacted in England, a great number of merchants sent their ships to Ireland, to be victualled for their ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... heavens many stars which shine with a variable brilliancy. Amongst these there is a class which exhibits special peculiarities; the members of this class are generally known as Algol Variables, because the variability of the star Beta Persei or Algol was the first of such cases to attract the attention of astronomers, and because it is perhaps still the ...
— Darwin and Modern Science • A.C. Seward and Others

... directors, consisting of three classes of three men each. Classes A and B are elected by the member banks by a system of group and preferential voting designed to prevent the large banks from outvoting the smaller ones. Directors of class A are chosen by the banks to represent them, and are expected to be bankers; those of class B, tho chosen by the banks and tho they may be stockholders, shall not be officers of any bank, and shall at the time of their election be actively engaged within ...
— Modern Economic Problems - Economics Vol. II • Frank Albert Fetter

... the girl very properly says, Garn! Married indeed! Don't you know that a woman of that class looks a worn out drudge of fifty ...
— Pygmalion • George Bernard Shaw

... as a class neither built towns nor loved to dwell therein. They were to be seen at their best in the vast, interminable forests that formed their chosen home. They won and kept their lands by force, and ever lived either at war or in dread of war. Hence they settled always in groups of ...
— The Winning of the West, Volume One - From the Alleghanies to the Mississippi, 1769-1776 • Theodore Roosevelt

... been heard to find fault with an agent because in making a difficult settlement he got all you wanted, and a free option on something further that everybody else wanted! Do you know of any other civilized nation of the first or even of the second class that wouldn't jump at that option on the Philippines? Ask Russia. Ask Germany. Ask Japan. Ask England or France. Ask little Belgium![1] And yet, what one of them, unless it be Japan, has any conceivable interest in the Philippines to be compared ...
— Problems of Expansion - As Considered In Papers and Addresses • Whitelaw Reid

... back to her. There was a warm glow of light from the cabin and a satisfying smell of food forward, and it was heavenly to hear Disko and the others, all quite alive and solid, leaning over the rail and promising them a first-class pounding. But the cook was a black; master of strategy. He did not get the dories aboard till he had given the more striking points of the tale, explaining as he backed and bumped round the counter how Harvey was the mascot to destroy any possible ...
— "Captains Courageous" • Rudyard Kipling

... is an invisible force; yet one may walk at all hours through this town without seeing a disorderly person, a man in liquor unable to take care of himself, or a female street-walker. Every one appears to have a home and bed of some kind, and the houseless are unknown as a class."—P. 394. ...
— The trade, domestic and foreign • Henry Charles Carey



Words linked to "Class" :   Euryalida, class Psilopsida, Polychaeta, Mastigophora, estate of the realm, course of instruction, propaedeutic, class Eumycetes, Pinophytina, Magnoliophyta, class Dicotyledones, Pyrenomycetes, subdivision Cycadophytina, subclass Hamamelidae, class Deuteromycetes, Dicotyledonae, Hepaticae, class Echinoidea, Psilopsida, Opisthobranchia, Zygomycetes, Mammalia, subclass Magnoliidae, subclass Rosidae, class list, trade, class Anthozoa, Acrasiomycetes, woodwind family, fair sex, second-class, Branchiopoda, class Ophiuroidea, workshop, first-class, subclass Archosauria, subdivision Gnetophytina, class Polyplacophora, Cyclosporeae, subdivision Coniferophytina, course of lectures, refresher course, class Cyclosporeae, home study, Heterokontae, subdivision Ginkgophytina, class Mastigophora, Hexapoda, class Equisetatae, stratum, Sphenopsida, underclass, working-class, subclass Alismatidae, class Insecta, class Psilotatae, class act, discussion section, Chilopoda, class Crinoidea, subclass Infusoria, classy, class Diplopoda, class Nuda, Ostracoda, ruling class, Flagellata, Tentaculata, Eumycetes, subclass Entomostraca, violin family, Diatomophyceae, class Oomycetes, division Gymnospermophyta, Commelinidae, class Aves, class Xanthophyceae, social class, Hemiascomycetes, fraternity, age class, Anapsida, class Holothuroidea, subclass Crossopterygii, class Hepaticae, class Arachnida, Dibranchiata, division Anthophyta, closed-class word, Teleostei, league, Trematoda, subclass Discomycetes, Eutheria, craft, upper class, class Phaeophyceae, subclass Rhizopoda, Dilleniidae, master class, class Filicinae, industrial arts, Echinoidea, Bivalvia, class Asteroidea, Equisetatae, Symphyla, class Ginkgopsida, first class, labor, Archosauria, Zoomastigina, Actinozoa, subclass Asteridae, life class, Gnathostomata, class Pinopsida, unitise, subclass Copepoda, Infusoria, Hepaticopsida, subclass Telosporidia, Discomycetes, number, word class, Coniferophyta, class Diatomophyceae, class Chondrichthyes, pigeonhole, size, Crossopterygii, Archaeornithes, class Pauropoda, class Zygomycetes, subdivision Pinophytina, Gymnospermophyta, group, Anthophyta, ninja, class feeling, Gastromycetes, class Magnoliopsida, compare, subclass Dibranchia, class Gasteromycetes, class Basidiomycetes, class Larvacea, class Gastropoda, family, count, subclass Zoomastigina, Aphasmidia, socio-economic class, Asteroidea, orientation course, class Lamellibranchia, class Ulvophyceae, sort, bourgeoisie, subclass Elasmobranchii, society, taxon, class struggle, center, Polyplacophora, class Anthoceropsida, Gymnospermae, Heterobasidiomycetes, Thaliacea, Sporozoa, Liliidae, assort, upper-class, class Hexapoda, Ophiurida, subclass Teleostei, class Chytridiomycetes, Monocotyledones, open-class word, Nuda, colloquialism, demimonde, class Ciliophora, upper-lower-class, class Liliopsida, the three estates, coursework, assemblage, histocompatibility complex, brass family, Telosporidia, recitation, Phasmidia, shop, Cnidosporidia, Filicopsida, Myriapoda, class Cryptophyceae, childbirth-preparation class, class war, class Channidae, Diplopoda, woman, subclass Selachii, form class, ranalian complex, Ascidiaceae, Prototheria, class Reptilia, Chelicerata, Pteridospermopsida, lecture, Osteichthyes, Oligochaeta, subclass Arecidae, middle class, firing line, commons, adult education, Actinopoda, market, lower-middle-class, Ulvophyceae, class Bryopsida, Cephalopoda, Musci, 1st class, denomination, Placodermi, Ciliata, class Tardigrada, class Hepaticopsida, Lycopodiate, subclass Caryophyllidae, subclass Holocephali, Pantotheria, Asteridae, class Scaphopoda, syntactic category, subclass Metatheria, upper-middle-class, Charophyceae, sophomore class, cabin class, class Sporozoa, year, class Taxopsida, accumulation, superclass Chelicerata, Amphineura, grammatical category, Psilotatae, class Bivalvia, sort out, class Ascomycetes, old school, class Monocotyledonae, class Lycopodineae, class Lycopodiate, Rhodophyceae, class Hirudinea, educational activity, upper crust, Cycadophyta, refresher, required course, Ginkgopsida, superclass Gnathostomata, Channidae, caste, Basidiomycetes, class Sphenopsida, class Actinozoa, Metatheria, class Gasteropoda, major form class, Coniferopsida, subclass Ostracoda, tourist class, class Polychaeta, Scyphozoa, superclass Myriapoda, subclass Lepidosauria, subclass Eutheria, economy class, Anthoceropsida, class Gymnospermae, class Pelecypoda, elective course, teaching, dichotomise, lesson, Hominoidea, third class, extension course, class Archiannelida, Dipnoi, class fellow, Liliopsida, class warfare, Agnatha, categorize, middle-class, lower class, booboisie, Crinoidea, catalog, Archiannelida, subclass Ophiurida, Phaeophyceae, Scaphopoda, categorise, estate, subclass Malacostraca, unitize, class period, aggregation, order, division, class Plectomycetes, subclass Phytomastigina, subclass Exopterygota, yeomanry, class Osteichthyes, subclass Opisthobranchia, class Schizomycetes, lower-class, freshman class, subclass Branchiopoda, second class, class Ascidiaceae, Insecta, gathering, elective, class Monocotyledones, subclass Archaeornithes, class Euglenophyceae, Euascomycetes, Holothuroidea, Sarcodina



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