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Bush   Listen
verb
Bush  v. t.  To furnish with a bush, or lining; as, to bush a pivot hole.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... went Hy Smith, also. He flagged a train about a mile out of town and hopped aboard. I come out of the bush and took the last car, telling the brakie a much-needed man had got on forward. Also, I took the Con. into my confidence. So just when we pulled into the next town I steps behind Mr. Troy, puts a gun against the back of his neck, and read the paper ...
— Red Saunders' Pets and Other Critters • Henry Wallace Phillips

... in the approach. One party holds the light, which is generally a dark lantern, another takes the net, and the third arms himself with a switch with which to beat the bushes. The net is first held upright about a foot from the bush, and the light thrown upon the back of it. The bush is then moderately beaten, and the birds affrighted and bewildered fly against the net, which is instantly closed. The bird is thus captured, and when a full roost can be discovered a ...
— Camp Life in the Woods and the Tricks of Trapping and Trap Making • William Hamilton Gibson

... and noble spirit passed away. The chief, from superstitious fear, insisted that the body should be immediately interred, and not on the island, and Mr. Burrup and the Malokolo therefore laid it in their canoe, and paddled to the mainland, where a spot was cleared in the bush, the grave dug, and as it was by this time too dark to see to read, Mr. Burrup said all that he could remember of the burial service, the four blacks standing wondering ...
— Pioneers and Founders - or, Recent Workers in the Mission field • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... off, we were all ready to march off too! And few companies of vagabonds in England ever marched off to prison in better spirits; we cheered one another, and laughed at our profound leader, until we came in sight of the black, bleak, and barren moor, without a solitary bush or blade of grass. Some of our prisoners swore that we had marched the whole length of England, and got into Scotland. We all agreed that it was not credible that such a hideous, barren spot could be any where found ...
— A Journal of a Young Man of Massachusetts, 2nd ed. • Benjamin Waterhouse

... strongest arguments for this alleged community of descent. Yet what is more certain to every observant field-naturalist than that this alleged uselessness of colouring is one of the greatest protections to the young bird, imperfect in its flight, perching on every spray, sitting unwarily on every bush through which the rays of sunshine dapple every bough to the colour of its own plumage, and so give it a facility of escape which it would utterly want if it bore the marked and prominent colours, the beauty of which the adult bird needs to recommend ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... A bush of wild marsh-marigold, That shines in hollows gray, He cut, and smiling to his love, He shoo-ed ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 11, June 11, 1870 • Various

... were rising fast, for between the Atlanteans and the savage Drilgoes there was as much difference as between a modern American and a blackfellow from the Australian bush. These men were civilized to a degree that even modern America has ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, May, 1930 • Various

... come. Good water," he continued, pointing to the slight tracts of grass which had sprung up where a stream rising among the rocks was losing itself in the dry soil, but which looked brighter and greener as it was nearer to the kopje, which was fairly furnished with thorn-bush and decent-sized trees. ...
— A Dash from Diamond City • George Manville Fenn

... no glimmer of fire as he now approached the water-hole made him doubly cautious. Nearer, he crouched behind a bush. He threw a pebble at the pony. She circled the picket, awakening Collie, who spoke to her sleepily. Saunders crept back toward his horse. He knew that voice. He would track the young rider to the range and beyond—to the gold. He rode back to town through the night, entered the ...
— Overland Red - A Romance of the Moonstone Canon Trail • Henry Herbert Knibbs

... and he gave Bully and Bawly and Lulu and Alice each a penny, and they bought peppermint candy, so Bully and Bawly had something good to eat, even if they didn't finish the race, and the bad fish had nothing. Now, in case I see a green rose in bloom on the pink lilac bush, I'll tell you next about Bully ...
— Bully and Bawly No-Tail • Howard R. Garis

... there seemed to be no dampness. Looking up the street towards the Corso, she saw that there was a wine shop, a few doors higher on the opposite side. Two or three men were standing before it, under the brown bush which served for a sign, and amongst them she saw a peasant in blue cloth clothes with silver buttons and clean white stockings. She recognized him as the man who had held his umbrella over her in the storm. He also saw her, lifted his felt hat and came forwards, ...
— Casa Braccio, Volumes 1 and 2 (of 2) • F. Marion Crawford

... but a straggler coming along later shot him as he was crawling to a spring for water. His bones lay on the ground unburied for years after the country was settled, the skull having been hung on a bush. At the junction of the Bark and Rock rivers Atkinson went into utter bewilderment and uncertainty as to Black Hawk's whereabouts, and he finally built the stockade at the point which bears his name. He dispatched ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 7 • Charles H. Sylvester

... meadow land between, from which the scent of myriads of wild-flowers rose on the cool night air. The moon sailed low in a perfectly cloudless sky, casting the shadows of the horsemen far before them as they rode, and clothing hill and dale, bush and tree, with a soft light, as if a cloud of silver gauze had settled down upon the scene. The incident in the ranche was quickly banished, and each traveller committed himself silently to the full enjoyment of the beauties around him—beauties ...
— The Golden Dream - Adventures in the Far West • R.M. Ballantyne

... understand that, lad. At night all the sounds of a tropical forest seem mysterious and weird, but in the broad daylight the bush will be comparatively still. The nocturnal animals will slink away to their lairs, and there will seem nothing strange to you in the songs and calls of the birds. I should recommend you all to take a sound dose of quinine tonight; I have a two and a half ...
— Among Malay Pirates - And Other Tales Of Adventure And Peril • G. A. Henty

... an alder-bush, and the boys came, one by one, and she heard this whispered, although there was no necessity for whispering, "Jim Patterson, ...
— The Copy-Cat and Other Stories • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... possible for even a dark-complexioned Caucasian to be reduced to a state of bondage. Fortunately, too, these people settled in the same section. The colored settlements at Dawn, Colchester, Elgin, Dresden, Windsor, Sandwich, Queens, Bush, Wilberforce, Hamilton, St. Catherines, Chatham, Riley, Anderton, Maiden, Gonfield, were all in Southern Ontario. In the course of time the growth of these groups produced a population sufficiently dense to facilitate cooeperation in matters ...
— The Education Of The Negro Prior To 1861 • Carter Godwin Woodson

... young woman the victim of death," the doctor said reflectively. "I get quite overcome myself when I see them suffer. I have never forgotten the pitiful sight of the young woman we picked up in the bush leading from the 'Grey House' one morning about ...
— Honor Edgeworth • Vera

... and the savages were well armed with spears and bows. At a shot from my rifle across the bows, both turned aside into a small creek out of range. In danger now of being flanked by the savages in the bush close aboard, I was obliged to hoist the sails, which I had barely lowered, and make across to the opposite side of the strait, a distance of six miles. But now I was put to my wit's end as to how I should weigh anchor, for through ...
— Sailing Alone Around The World • Joshua Slocum

... little son who was standing thoughtfully before the gooseberry bush in the garden. She noted that his expression was ...
— Jokes For All Occasions - Selected and Edited by One of America's Foremost Public Speakers • Anonymous

... above all, the familiar indigenous grasses were lost, and replaced by what the settlers took to be nothing but worthless weeds. All the now prized edible shrubs, such as the many kinds of saltbush, the cotton-bush, &c., were amongst these despised plants; and even the very stock did not take to them, until some years of use had rendered them familiar. These drought-resisting plants were at first supposed to be confined to the inner slope of the range, but the extended exploration of the ...
— The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888 • Ernest Favenc

... bush'd, and must have the swag, [10] Walk into tattlers, shiners, and never fear the lag; [11] Then patter to all spicey, and tip 'em lots of fun, [12] And blunt you'll never want while you've got a pop-gun. [13] Fol, de, ...
— Musa Pedestris - Three Centuries of Canting Songs - and Slang Rhymes [1536 - 1896] • John S. Farmer

... and nowhere could they be found. It was clear to Hawk-eye that they still lived, and had been carried off by Magua. With untiring energy he at once set off to try and discover the trail. It was Uncas, who, finding a portion of Cora's skirt caught on a bush, first opened up the line of pursuit. He it was, too, who read the track of Magua's feet on the ground—the unmistakable straddling toe of the drinking savage. An ornament dropped by Alice, and the large footprints of the ...
— The Worlds Greatest Books - Vol. II: Fiction • Arthur Mee, J. A. Hammerton, Eds.

... about abandoning polygamy: "Woodruff has a regular system of changing his harem. He takes in one or more young girls, and so manages, after he tires of them, that they are glad to ask for a divorce, after which he beats the bush for recruits. He took a fresh one, about fourteen years old, in March, 1853, and will probably get rid of her in the course of the ensuing ...
— The Story of the Mormons: • William Alexander Linn

... simply don't have what they need to grow and learn in their own homes or schools or neighborhoods. And that means the rest of us must do more, for they are our children, too. That's why President Bush, General Colin Powell, former Housing Secretary Henry Cisneros will join the vice president and me to lead the President's Summit of ...
— State of the Union Addresses of William J. Clinton • William J. Clinton

... gazing and listening, a human voice came out of the night—a call prolonged and modulated like the coo-ee of the Australian bush, far off and faint; but the children in the kitchen heard it at the same time, for they too had been listening, and instantly ...
— Afoot in England • W.H. Hudson

... sense, was stronger than my fear; for I could not remain where I was, but crept back to the bank again, whence, sheltering my head behind a bush of broom, I might command the road before our door. I was scarcely in position ere my enemies began to arrive, seven or eight of them, running hard, their feet beating out of time along the road, and the man with the lantern some paces in front. Three ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 6 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... The valley or the mountain Afforded visits, and still Paradise lay In some green shade or fountain. Angels lay lieger here: each bush and cell, Each oak and highway knew them; Walk but the fields, or sit down at some well, And he ...
— Gifts of Genius - A Miscellany of Prose and Poetry by American Authors • Various

... often favour her by visiting them, without waiting to have her visits returned, as she was entitled by her infirmities to particular indulgencies. He was continuing in this strain, receiving from Cecilia hardly any answer, when suddenly from behind a thick laurel bush, jumpt up Mr Morrice; who had run out of the house by a shorter cut, and planted himself there ...
— Cecilia vol. 2 - Memoirs of an Heiress • Frances (Fanny) Burney (Madame d'Arblay)

... had taken quick note of the surroundings, the location of the home itself, the arrangement of the grounds. There was a spreading lawn on all four sides, unbroken by plant or bush or tree—sheer prodigality of space, the better to display a rambling but most artistic pile of gray granite. Masking the road and the adjoining grounds was thick, impenetrable shrubbery, a ring of miniature forest land about the estate. There was a garage, set ...
— The Film Mystery • Arthur B. Reeve

... the lad! Here's summer bringin' trees to fruit, An' every bush with roses clad, An' nature in her finest suit, An' all things as they used to be In days before the war came on. Yet time has changed both him an' me, An' I am ...
— The Path to Home • Edgar A. Guest

... a strictly candid history, I will at once confess the truth, on behalf of my hero and his brothers and sisters. They had spent the morning in decorating the old church, in pricking holly about the house, and in making a mistletoe bush. Then in the afternoon they had tasted the Christmas soup and seen it given out; they had put a finishing touch to the snow man by crowning him with holly, and had dragged the yule-logs home from the carpenter's. And now, the early tea being over, Paterfamilias had gone to ...
— Melchior's Dream and Other Tales • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... familiar with the sumac-bush, which grows nearly all over the United States. Of course we do not mean the poisonous swamp-sumac, but that which grows along the fences and on the edges of the woods. Of late years the leaves of this bush have been greatly in demand for tanning ...
— What Might Have Been Expected • Frank R. Stockton

... of the bush or waste of time, I'll speak. I be come 'bout Blanchard, as I dare say you guessed. The news of what he done nine or ten years ago comed to me just a month since. A month 't was, or might be three weeks. Like a bolt from ...
— Children of the Mist • Eden Phillpotts

... not you are so fair; For you beside the sea were born: The sea-waves keep you fresh and fair, Like roses on their leafy thorn. If roses grow on the rose-bush, Your roses through midwinter blush; If roses bloom on the rose-bed, Your face can show both ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Second Series • John Addington Symonds

... nearest bramble, cut off a piece and say, "And the Angel of the Lord appeared to him in a flame of fire," etc., as in Exod. iii. 2. On the morrow cut off another piece and say, "The Lord saw that he (the fever) turned aside;" then upon the third day say, "Draw not hither," and stooping down, pray, "Bush, bush! the Holy One—blessed be He!—caused His Shechinah to lodge upon thee, not because thou art the loftiest, for thou art the lowest of all trees; and as when thou didst see the fire of Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, thou didst flee therefrom, so see the ...
— Hebraic Literature; Translations from the Talmud, Midrashim and - Kabbala • Various

... he, "it's well seen it was a Campbell taught ye! It would be a convenient world for them and their sort, if there was no such a thing as a lad and a gun behind a heather bush! But that's nothing to the point. This is ...
— Kidnapped • Robert Louis Stevenson

... in our town, And he was wondrous wise, He jumped into a bramble bush, And scratched out both his eyes; But when he saw his eyes were out, With all his might and main, He jumped into another bush, And scratched ...
— Pinafore Palace • Various

... from one of the Cycle Corps, and have ridden it in the garden, in a bush to the right ...
— The Hill - A Romance of Friendship • Horace Annesley Vachell

... sweeter berries Growin' on a higher bush? An' does my combersation suit? If not, ...
— Negro Folk Rhymes - Wise and Otherwise: With a Study • Thomas W. Talley

... dead. "Sometimes I fit whole days together, just thinking of those old times. 'Then what did we do after that lunch?' I think, or 'Where were we going that night that we were in such a hurry?' and then by degrees it all comes back." Julia drew a rose toward her on a tall bush, studied its leaves critically. "That was the happiest time, wasn't it, Jim?" she ...
— The Story Of Julia Page - Works of Kathleen Norris, Volume V. • Kathleen Norris

... great fluttering and stirring in an elder bush. Hundreds of little birds suddenly thrust their heads out between the leaves ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... every day across a beaten bush track, from their weather-board cottage home, past the big iron gates of Dene Hall, a house built of grey stone in the early days of the colony, where their irascible grandsire dwelt, up a red dusty road to the little ...
— An Australian Lassie • Lilian Turner

... take in your curagh to Conchubor in Emain. FERGUS — gathering up his parchments. — And you won't go, surely. NAISI. I will not. . . . I've had dread, I tell you, dread winter and summer, and the autumn and the springtime, even when there's a bird in every bush making his own stir till the fall of night; but this talk's brought me ease, and I see we're as happy as the leaves on the young trees, and we'll be so ever and always, though we'd live the age of the eagle and the salmon and the crow of Britain. FERGUS — with anger. ...
— Deirdre of the Sorrows • J. M. Synge

... Gregg's division encountered the enemy a short distance beyond Middleburg and drove them five miles in the direction of Ashby's Gap. There was no regular line formation, but the Indian mode of fighting was adopted on both sides, by taking advantage of every stone, fence, bush, or hollow, to shelter the men. Before the action was over Kilpatrick's command came up ...
— Chancellorsville and Gettysburg - Campaigns of the Civil War - VI • Abner Doubleday

... from the darkness under the windows to know if His Majesty was safe. There had been a plot to take him; but the ambuscaders had been ambuscaded in their turn, and not a man of them remained—which was hardly exact, for under a laurel bush, scarce daring to breathe, lay Sir Rowland Blake, livid with fear and fury, and bleeding from a rapier scratch in the cheek, but ...
— Mistress Wilding • Rafael Sabatini

... the bush have such splendid plumage! but I'd rather have the modest sparrow in my hand. However, I'm very glad our affairs are marching. How did you ...
— Birds of Prey • M. E. Braddon

... his shoulders, and laughed. "I presume," he said, "the worst apartment in your chateau is considerably superior to the old tobacco-cask, in which I was fain to take up my night's lodging when I was in the Bush, as the Virginians call it, with the light corps. There I lay, like Diogenes himself, so delighted with my covering from the elements, that I made a vain attempt to have it rolled on to my next quarters; ...
— Waverley Volume XII • Sir Walter Scott

... on the north point, about two miles from the village, and surround it, and then wait till daylight. You can do it easily enough with thirty men, as it lies at the foot of the mountain, and there is no escape for the beggars unless they break through you and get into the bush. Be guided by the Fiji boy; and, as the Yankees say, 'no one wants a brass band with him when he's going duck-hunting,' so try and surround the village as quietly as possible. I'll see that none of them get away in their canoes. I'll ...
— "Martin Of Nitendi"; and The River Of Dreams - 1901 • Louis Becke

... newspapers. Thence was sent to Oxford, where he continued about a year, but not well satisfied; wishing, of all things, to see London, and become a player. At length, receiving his quarterly allowance of fifteen guineas, instead of discharging his debts, he went out of town, hid his gown in a furze-bush, and walked to London; where, having no friend to advise him, he fell into bad company, soon spent his guineas, found no means of being introduced among the players, grew necessitous, pawned his clothes, and wanted bread. Walking ...
— The Printer Boy. - Or How Benjamin Franklin Made His Mark. An Example for Youth. • William M. Thayer

... He fell into it. He had essayed to walk along the trunk of a fallen pine. The rotten bark gave way under his feet, and with a despairing yelp he pitched down the rounded crescent, smashed through the leafage and stalks of a small bush, and in the heart of the bush, on the ground, fetched up in the midst of ...
— White Fang • Jack London

... from the first day. In the town you have insufferable heat, boredom, and no society; if you go out into the country, you fancy poisonous spiders, scorpions, or snakes lurking under every stone and behind every bush, and beyond the fields—mountains and the desert. Alien people, an alien country, a wretched form of civilisation—all that is not so easy, brother, as walking on the Nevsky Prospect in one's fur coat, arm-in-arm with Nadyezhda Fyodorovna, dreaming of the sunny South. What is needed here ...
— The Duel and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... half- hour. I took pussy to my own room, and spread a clean towel on the floor. I could have kissed her when she returned the lace to sight, very much as it had gone down. Jenny had boiling water ready, and we soaked it and soaked it, and spread it on a lavender- bush in the sun before I could touch it again, even to put it in milk. But now your ladyship would never guess that it had been in ...
— Cranford • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... heard that far away in New Zealand, travellers who try to make their way through the great tangle of trees and creepers which is called the "Bush," speak of the silence and loneliness of the dense forests as dreadful, and they particularly mention that there is no voice of bird to be heard there. Very different is a place I know, where, although the trees ...
— Twilight And Dawn • Caroline Pridham

... Bloomsbury! and it is now the 2nd of February. A respite! Perhaps, who knows? She may never arrive at Bloomsbury at all! There are young men in Australia, a hoyden, as far as the professor has read (and that is saying a good deal), would just suit the man in the bush. ...
— A Little Rebel - A Novel • Margaret Wolfe Hungerford

... Factions arise on every side, and threaten the tranquillity of your native country. But whatever happen, do you faithfully honor and obey your prince, and adhere to the crown. I charge you never to forsake the crown, though it should hang upon a bush." "These last words," added Windham, "made such impressions on all our breasts, that the many afflictions of these sad times could never efface their indelible characters." From innumerable instances, it appears how deep rooted, in the minds of the English ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part E. - From Charles I. to Cromwell • David Hume

... scrambling through thickets of cactus, and he again came to a stop, all, of course, doing the same. This time to use their ears, rather than eyes; since around all was black as a pot of pitch, the nearest object, rock or bush, being scarcely visible. ...
— The Free Lances - A Romance of the Mexican Valley • Mayne Reid

... had. He was always buying, and living large; but that can't last for ever. I saw him first at a muster. I was then just eighteen, and went out with the rest, for the first time. Maybe, 'squire, I didn't take the rag off the bush that day. I belonged to Captain Williams's troop, called the 'Bush-Whackers.' We were all fine-looking fellows, though I say it myself. I was no chicken, I tell you. From that day, Mark Forrester wrote himself down 'man' And well he ...
— Guy Rivers: A Tale of Georgia • William Gilmore Simms

... almost always that which treats of force and action, so upon our sick-bed we turn most gladly to scenes of heroism and adventure. The famous ride in 'Geoffrey Hamlyn,' where the fate of the heroine, threatened with worse than death from the bush-rangers, hangs upon the horse's speed, seems to us, as we lie abed, one of the finest episodes in fiction. 'Tom Cringle's Log,' too, becomes a great favourite, not more from its buoyancy and freshness than from the melodramatic scenes with which it ...
— Some Private Views • James Payn

... looked up into her eyes. With a cry, which was half laughter, she raced with him along the path, scattering the wild birds into flight from bush and thicket. ...
— A Young Man in a Hurry - and Other Short Stories • Robert W. Chambers

... Marocco, the report became general that the Emperor was wounded. It is asserted that several men in ambush had orders to wait their opportunity to fire at the Emperor, when he should approach; and when the Emperor did approach the bush wherein these men lay concealed, they all fired. It appears, however, that only one shot had effect. The Emperor finding himself wounded, instead of being discouraged, was reanimated to the combat, ...
— An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa • Abd Salam Shabeeny

... to a lion looking out of a bush to frighten ten boys already,' said Louis. 'I'll do the ...
— Dynevor Terrace (Vol. II) • Charlotte M. Yonge

... manage in the bush? Did you have to camp out?" asked Hil, with an appearance of great interest, ...
— Australia Revenged • Boomerang

... any use beating about the bush. You got Black Jack's blood in you. That's plain. I remember ...
— Black Jack • Max Brand

... or they were purple seas of larkspur. Mountain-roses and wild lilac tangled in a maze of pink and white and gold. Bear-clover crowned the bald gray heads of rocks, or shone out like star-white strawberry blossoms from under a thicket of deer-bush. Wild asters burned rosily, like small Catherine wheels half extinguished. Small, mottled tiger lilies blazed among the pale young fronds of growing bracken: the air was scented with wild roses and the spicy fragrance of manzanita trees—the ...
— The Port of Adventure • Charles Norris Williamson and Alice Muriel Williamson

... speaks a little more plainly, once for all, and goes off smiling to some one else; as a hummingbird, if a flower has no honey in it, whirs away, with a saucy flirt of its pretty little tail, to the next branch on the bush. ...
— Two Years Ago, Volume I • Charles Kingsley

... nonsense!" said Rosa, deliberately tearing the bold "geant" to pieces down to the bare stem, "unless he meant to be comic, and intimate that the gazer was so rash as to come too near the bush, and ran ...
— At Last • Marion Harland

... a lark flew impudently past his head and perched upon a bush near by and sang straight at him. As a general thing Luck loved to hear bird songs when he rode abroad on a fine morning; but he came very near taking a shot at that particular lark, as if it were personally responsible for ...
— The Phantom Herd • B. M. Bower

... England, and Scotland are Bible pictures. What were the subjects of Raphael's great paintings? "The Transfiguration," "The Miraculous Draught of Fishes," "The Charge to Peter," "The Holy Family," "The Massacre of the Innocents," "Moses at the Burning Bush," "The Nativity," "Michael the Archangel," and the four or five exquisite "Madonnas." What are Tintoretto's great pictures? "Fall of Adam," "Cain and Abel," "The Plague of the Fiery Serpent," "Paradise," "Agony in the Garden," "The Temptation," "The Adoration of the ...
— New Tabernacle Sermons • Thomas De Witt Talmage

... over river, Through bush, and brake, and forest, Ran the cunning Pau-Puk-Keewis; Like an antelope he bounded, Till he came unto a streamlet In the middle of the forest, To a streamlet still and tranquil, That had overflowed its margin, To a ...
— The Song Of Hiawatha • Henry W. Longfellow

... unimaginable tortures. I crept back and forth in such dumb, nameless frights as frontier children may have felt, who, in old times of Indian war, passed through woods where the red hand of a Wyandot might grasp them out of any bush. I have not the least idea why this wretched Reddiford used to hunt me so, as when one doth hunt a partridge in the mountains, unless out of pure beastly enjoyment of my childish frights. He did, once or twice, hustle me about, I ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 108, October, 1866 • Various

... held in this way there had been some skirmishing also on the northern frontier of the Transvaal. Shortly after the outbreak of the war the gallant Blackburn, scouting with six comrades in thick bush, found himself in the presence of a considerable commando. The British concealed themselves by the path, but Blackburn's foot was seen by a keen-eyed Kaffir, who pointed it out to his masters. A sudden volley riddled Blackburn with bullets; but his men stayed by him and drove off the enemy. Blackburn ...
— The Great Boer War • Arthur Conan Doyle

... must have been considerable, for immediately following the discharge there arose a tremendous outburst of shrieks, yells, and groans, shouted orders, and cries of encouragement; and Frobisher saw several forms leap out of the bush and go crashing to earth ...
— A Chinese Command - A Story of Adventure in Eastern Seas • Harry Collingwood

... Foxy in a grand new kennel, and me in a seat in chapel, and a bush o' laylac give me for myself, and a garden and a root ...
— Gone to Earth • Mary Webb

... said Mr. Penrose, stepping from behind the garden bush. 'You see your husband is right, Mrs. Ashworth. I've not forgotten it is baking-day, or that I was due ...
— Lancashire Idylls (1898) • Marshall Mather

... 'a' drank, only for the name on't. So we pulled ashore after some, and findin' a spring near by, was takin' it out, hand over hand, as fast as we could bale it up, when all of a sudden the mate see a bunch of feathers over a little bush near by, and yelled out to run for our lives, the savages ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 5, March, 1858 • Various

... combinations of the understanding. "The law is open to every one: so," said Mr. Tooke, "is the London Tavern!" It is the previous deduction formed in the mind, and the splenetic contempt felt for a practical sophism, that beats about the bush for, and at last finds the apt illustration; not the casual, glancing coincidence of two objects, that points out an absurdity to the understanding. So, on another occasion, when Sir Allan Gardiner (who ...
— The Spirit of the Age - Contemporary Portraits • William Hazlitt

... woke up and got one of his eyes open. And when he saw how things stood, he swore to God he would live, merely for the sake of killing his false friend. He crawled to a spring near by, where he found a bush of ripe bull-berries. He waited day after day for strength, and finally started out to crawl a small matter of one hundred miles to the nearest fort. And he did it, too! Also he found his friend ...
— The River and I • John G. Neihardt

... wide. If Grasshopper proposed to himself a short stroll in the morning, he was at once miles out of town. When he entered a lodge, if he happened for a moment to forget himself, he walked straight through the leathern, or wooden, or earthen walls, as if he had been merely passing through a bush. At his meals he broke in pieces all the dishes, set them down as lightly as he would; and putting a leg out of bed when he rose, it was a common thing for him to push off the top of ...
— The Indian Fairy Book - From the Original Legends • Cornelius Mathews

... hair of body, pile, especially the pecten. See Bruckhardt (Prov. No. 202), "grieving for lack of a cow she made a whip of her bush," said of those who console themselves by building Castles in Spain. The "parts below the waist" is the decent ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 9 • Richard F. Burton

... up in the wind, "Mind, skipper, or you will run down Old Betty." I was astonished at the insinuation against my noble captain that he was likely to behave rude to a lady, but my suspicions were soon removed, when I saw Old Betty was a buoy, floating on the waters, adorned with a furze bush. Old Betty danced merrily on the rippling wave with her furze bush by way of a feather, with shreds of dried sea weed hanging to it forming ribbons to complete the head dress of the lady buoy. The nearer we approached, the more rapid did Betty dance, and when we passed close ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction. - Volume 19, No. 535, Saturday, February 25, 1832. • Various

... many years back, including the Swan on the Hop, Holborn; White Hart, north-east of Drury Lane; the Rose, already mentioned. In the parish also were various houses of entertainment, of which the most notorious was the Hare and Hounds, formerly Beggar in the Bush, which was kept by one Joe Banks in 1844, and was the resort of all classes. This was in Buckridge Street, over which New Oxford Street now runs. In the last sixty years the face of the parish has been greatly ...
— Holborn and Bloomsbury - The Fascination of London • Sir Walter Besant

... comparison in apparent density. Stephen, shattered in spirit and sick to his heart's centre, turned away. In turning, he saw a shadowy outline behind the summer-house on the other side. His eyes grew accustomed to the darkness. Was the form a human form, or was it an opaque bush ...
— A Pair of Blue Eyes • Thomas Hardy

... so it is when one's thoughts are not collected. "What!" said Gerda. "Are there no roses here?" and she ran about amongst the flowerbeds, and looked, and looked, but there was not one to be found. She then sat down and wept; but her hot tears fell just where a rose-bush had sunk; and when her warm tears watered the ground, the tree shot up suddenly as fresh and blooming as when it had been swallowed up. Gerda kissed the roses, thought of her own dear roses at home, and with ...
— Andersen's Fairy Tales • Hans Christian Andersen

... or superior to them, while they were really only his servants. They did not seem to notice Gordyeeff, although, when Yozhov introduced Foma to them, they shook hands with him and said that they were glad to see him. He lay down under a hazel-bush, and watched them all, feeling himself a stranger in this company, and noticing that even Yozhov seemed to have got away from him deliberately, and was paying but little attention to him. He perceived something strange about Yozhov; ...
— Foma Gordyeff - (The Man Who Was Afraid) • Maxim Gorky

... Joseph Nourse, married Rebecca Morris whose father, Anthony Morris, of Philadelphia, was an intimate and life-long friend of Dolly Madison. Major Nourse built the old stone house out on the road to Rockville and called it "The Highlands." Tradition says that a large box bush at "The Highlands" has grown from a tiny sprig of box which Mrs. Madison plucked from her bouquet at the inauguration of her husband and ...
— A Portrait of Old George Town • Grace Dunlop Ecker

... of me I heard muffled steps, yet saw no form. But suddenly a doorway opened in the east and out strode the sun. In the air above and about me, behold, the wonder of diamond domes and slender minarets traced in pearl! The wayside banks were fringed with crystal spray of downbeaten weed and bush that sparkled like the billows of a sunlit sea. The tall elms here and there towered like the masts of returning ships, slow sailing from a wintry voyage back to summer lands and splendor. There was no sound in all the air, but the whole universe seemed singing as when the morning stars ...
— A String of Amber Beads • Martha Everts Holden

... philosophic enlightenment will explain this phenomenon. The acute observer, if faith have cleared his eye or opened an inner one, will go back for the explanation to an old and unforgotten promise, and will exclaim when he sees the Church struggling, but triumphant, like the fire-girdled bush at Horeb, "God is in the midst of her, she shall not be moved; God shall help her, and that right early." And not only in the preservation from her enemies but in her unfailing progress among men in every age, has God shown that his purpose is to build ...
— The Wesleyan Methodist Pulpit in Malvern • Knowles King

... to be the case that we lie in the middle of His creation, the one exception to the universal law, like Gideon's fleece, dry and dusty, while every poor bit of bush and grass round about is soaked with His dew. If 'the earth is full of Thy mercy,' Thou thereby hast pledged Thyself that my heart shall be full of Thy law and Thy grace, if I ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... had been more and more torn, until there was literally not a scrap of sound skin upon them anywhere. Even the beaters, a stolid lot, had roared when old VELVETEENS the second keeper had brought up to poor COODENT a lump of flesh from his right leg, which he had found sticking on a thorn-bush in the centre of the high covert. Suddenly Sir HENRY stopped and shaded his eyes with his hand anxiously. We all imitated him, though for my part, not being a sportsman, I had no notion what was up. ...
— Punch, or The London Charivari, Vol. 100., Jan. 17, 1891 • Various

... the men with her glasses. Occasionally one moved, hitching himself forward to some point which afforded a better view. One or two knelt in the bottom of shallow draws, peering from behind some sheltering bush. Inside the stockade she could see Lang's men kneeling or flattened on the ground as they gazed through cracks in ...
— The Settling of the Sage • Hal G. Evarts

... goat to men upon earth to say, "There is something which they call Death. He will kill some of you. But even if you die, you will not perish completely. You will come to me in heaven." So off the goat set with this cheering intelligence. But before he came to the town he saw a tempting bush by the wayside and stopped to browse on it. When God in heaven saw the goat thus loitering by the way, he sent off a sheep with the same message to carry the glad tidings to men without delay. But the sheep ...
— The Belief in Immortality and the Worship of the Dead, Volume I (of 3) • Sir James George Frazer

... side, a baby-girl groping helplessly for the mother's breast. Then—was it only yesterday?—when she was waiting for the return of the christening party, a carriage drove up with the village doctor and an elegant stranger. There was much beating about the bush, and then it came out like a thunderbolt. The stranger was a great doctor from the capital, entrusted with the mission to find in the mountains an honest, comely peasant woman, and married she must be, to act as wet-nurse for the expected crown ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol. I • Various

... dislike to boots, although issued as part of his equipment. On ceremonial parades he will wear them, outwardly uncomplainingly, but at the first opportunity he will discard them, slinging the unnecessary footgear round his neck. Thorns, that in the "bush" will rip the best pair of British-made marching-boots to shreds in a very short time, trouble him hardly at all, for the soles of his feet, which with the palms of his hands are the only white parts of his epidermis, are as ...
— Wilmshurst of the Frontier Force • Percy F. Westerman

... away under him his excitement began to mount with the sweep of his horse's stride. The exultation of rapid motion mingled with the rising fever of his wound; he wished to shout aloud, to sing. Vague forms seemed to slip by him in the shadows; in every bush beside the road he saw white faces lurking. Strange and half-formed impressions haunted him, of bearded men passing, who sometimes spoke an unknown tongue and sometimes vanished silently as ghosts. Later, he could not tell ...
— Nicanor - Teller of Tales - A Story of Roman Britain • C. Bryson Taylor

... more cramped from his stooping position, and chilled by the sharp autumn air. During all that time the men talked earnestly, then, shortly after eleven, they got up and approached the window. Willis retreated quickly behind his bush. ...
— The Pit Prop Syndicate • Freeman Wills Crofts

... a wonder of strange beauty with its masses of flowers. Judith brought some roses from the bush her playmate pointed out. She put them into a light bowl which was like a bubble of thin, clear glass and stood on ...
— In the Closed Room • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... bunker, water (except casual water), sand, path, road, railway, whin, bush, rushes, rabbit scrape, fence, or ditch. Sand blown on to the grass, or sprinkled on the course for its preservation, bare patches, sheep tracks, snow, and ice are not hazards. Permanent grass within a hazard is not part of ...
— The Complete Golfer [1905] • Harry Vardon

... expressing frequently a desire to depart and end his days in peace. His faithful Hopper sustained and consoled him, but even Joachim could not soothe his sorrows when he reflected that after all the work performed by himself and colleagues, "they had only been beating the bush for others," while their own share in the spoils had been withheld. Nothing could well be more contumelious than Margaret's treatment of the learned Frisian. When other councillors were summoned to a session at three o'clock, ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... from the blanket on which he and Jose Medina had been lying during the night. It had been spread on a patch of turf in a break of the hill some hundreds of feet above the sea. He was cold. The blanket was drenched and the dew hung like a frost on bush ...
— The Summons • A.E.W. Mason

... Holmes, Senator Prescott Bush admitted that Holmes' tanker deals were improper and ill-advised, but claimed that Holmes was an innocent victim of sharp operators! The "innocent" victim made a million dollars in one year by being victimized. He has never offered ...
— The Invisible Government • Dan Smoot

... with all his force. The pig naturally bounds off, the shaft comes out of the socket, leaving the spearhead sticking in the wound. The rope uncoils of itself, but being firmly fastened to the bamboo, it brings up the pig at each bush, and tears and lacerates the wound, until either the spearhead comes out, or the wretched pig drops down dead from exhaustion and loss of blood. The gualla follows upon his buffalo, and frequently finishes the pig with a few strokes of his lathee. In any case he gets his pork, and ...
— Sport and Work on the Nepaul Frontier - Twelve Years Sporting Reminiscences of an Indigo Planter • James Inglis

... crossed by the Pangran of Bantam, who gave us leave to beat the bush, and thought to have caught the birds himself, but was deceived in ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume IX. • Robert Kerr

... the lonely mountains, Where the wild men watched and waited Wolves in the forest, and bears in the bush, And I on my ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For, Book Two • Various

... far off; and again his mellow voice went through that gallant and plaintive strain, though in a far more subdued manner than the first time he had sung it; and Henry, weakened and softened, actually dropped a brave man's tear at the 'bracken bush upon the lily lea,' and the ...
— The Caged Lion • Charlotte M. Yonge

... soldiers received some news which seemed to excite them a great deal. A messenger in a state of exhaustion, who had an injury to the fleshy part of his left arm, which looked to me as though it had been caused by a bullet, appeared out of the bush and said something of which, by straining my ears, I caught two words—"Great slaughter." Then Kambula laid his fingers on his lips as a signal for silence and led the man away, nor did I see or hear any more ...
— Marie - An Episode in The Life of the late Allan Quatermain • H. Rider Haggard

... delighted in keeping her in continual dread of dreadful punishments, and so making her suffer day and night. She made her go barefooted into the garden on the coldest mornings to fetch her a flower, or she kept her whole hours with her head in the sun to keep the birds from picking at a currant bush. She made her sleep on the ground by the side of her bed, when she sent her several times down into the kitchen for water. She reduced her to eating food she knew she did not like, and deprived her of what ...
— The Grandee • Armando Palacio Valds

... not a distinct profession by itself, but practised by men in orders, witness Nicholas de Ternham, the chief English physician and Bishop of Durham; Hugh of Evesham, a physician and cardinal; Grysant, physician and pope; John Chambers, Dr. of Physick, was the first Bishop of Peterborough; Paul Bush, a bachelor of divinitie in Oxford, was a man well read in physick as well as divinitie, he was the ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... heather and bracken. When he came to a little dry hollow, with a yet thicker growth of heather, its tops almost close as those of his bed at his father's cottage, he sought no further. Taking his knife, he cut a quantity of heather and ferns, and heaped it on the top of the thickest bush; then creeping in between the cut and the growing, he cleared the former from his face that he might see the worlds over him, and putting his knapsack under ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... am still!' cried Synesius, tears of excitement glittering in his eyes;.... while Raphael gave himself up to the joy, and forgot even Victoria, in the breathless rush over rock and bush, ...
— Hypatia - or, New Foes with an Old Face • Charles Kingsley

... From old Crow Nest wing your way; Through the bush and dewy brake, Fairies, hasten, for the sake Of a mortal, whose pure breath Soon will fade, and sink in death: We for him sweet dreams will find, We will fill with balm the wind; Watch his young life glide away, Deck with beauty its ...
— The Fairy Nightcaps • Frances Elizabeth Barrow

... British frigates the Guerriere and the Macedonian, and sloop of war Frolic; and the President is also requested to present a silver medal,[77] with like emblems and devices, to the nearest male relative of Lieutenant Bush, and one to the nearest male relative of Lieutenant Funk, in testimony of the gallantry and merit of those deceased officers, in whom their country has sustained a ...
— The Medallic History of the United States of America 1776-1876 • J. F. Loubat

... attracted my attention because its trunk and lower branches were discoloured, as if a large fire had recently been lit underneath it. A clump of bushes grew in front of it which concealed the base. Well, as I looked towards it, I was surprised to see projecting above the bush, and fastened apparently to the tree, a pair of fine riding boots with the toes upwards. At first I thought that they were tied there, but as I looked harder I saw that they were secured by a great nail ...
— The Exploits Of Brigadier Gerard • Arthur Conan Doyle

... but not very heartily, and walked slowly to the house, leaving her bending over a rose-bush, and a shade more pensive than the most pensive garden lady in ...
— The Magnificent Ambersons • Booth Tarkington

... him. I was at that moment standing by him, when he clapped his hand to his ear and exclaimed, "That was a 'hot one,'" as a bullet just ticked it. "There is the devil who did it. See him behind that bush?" and with that he aimed and fired. ...
— War from the Inside • Frederick L. (Frederick Lyman) Hitchcock

... but a finer picture of fear and astonishment I never saw. He stood incapable of moving a limb, riveted to the spot, mouth open and eyes staring. . . . He remained motionless until our black got within a few yards of him, when suddenly throwing down his waddies, he jumped into a mulga bush as high as he could get." He could not speak, and answered not a word to the inquiries made by the black, but, trembling from head to foot, "waved with his hand ...
— The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals • Charles Darwin

... I have," insisted Bob. "You know Dr. Guerin sold every one of those charms I carved, and I haven't spent a cent. It's all buried in a little canvas bag under the rose bush, just like a movie. I hate to take ...
— Betty Gordon in Washington • Alice B. Emerson

... small gold fishes were disporting—now circling about in rapid evolutions, and anon leaping above the surface, and displaying their brilliant sides in the rays of the setting sun. When we had watched for some moments their happy gambols, Mr. C. turned around and broke a twig from a bush that stood behind us; "there is a bush," said he, "which has committed many a murder." On requesting him to explain, he said, that the root of it was a most deadly poison, and that the slave women used to make a decoction of it and give to their infants to destroy ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... The principal Mandan chief was Black Cat; White Buffalo Robe Unfolded represented the Annahaways, and the Minnetaree chief was Black Moccasin. This last-named chief could not come to the council, but was represented by Caltahcota, or Cherry on a Bush. The palaver being over, presents ...
— First Across the Continent • Noah Brooks

... some have pretended, nor a "sooty black skin" according to the opinion of others. She described the spot where she saw him with such exceeding accuracy, that I never thereafter, for more than ten years, passed the particular "bush in the little valley, three steps from the gate," by daylight, without a shudder, and never at all by night. She had seen the spirit of her mother, too, employed in knitting woollen hose for her father's spirit. There was not one of my ...
— Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 1 (of 3) • James Athearn Jones

... the dearest old bachelor—maybe that is the reason the boy has such reverence for womankind. I don't know which he comes nearest worshiping—women or horses. Whenever we rode out—he was my steadfast gallant—he managed somehow to pass through or by or around Haw Bush, where the Heathflower thing was bred. Old Major Mediwether, her owner, is Billy's best chum. They match beautifully—though the major is nearly eighty, and Billy ...
— Ainslee's, Vol. 15, No. 5, June 1905 • Various

... robin sings as of old from the limb! The catbird croons in the lilac-bush! Through the dim arbor, himself more dun, Silently hops the ...
— The Writings of John Burroughs • John Burroughs

... from his chair, and took a turn across the room. "The truth is, Margaret, that there's no use in my beating about the bush. I shan't say what I've got to say a bit the better for delaying it. I want you to be my wife, and to be mother to those children. I like you better than any woman I've seen since I lost Rachel, but I shouldn't dare to ...
— Miss Mackenzie • Anthony Trollope

... again. But in the morning he appeared on a low shrub on the lawn, and about nine o'clock he took courage to launch himself on wing. He flew very low across the street, and dropped into the tall grass at the foot of a lilac bush. Why the parents considered that less safe than the open lawn I could not see, but they evidently did, for one of them perched upon the lilac, and filled the air with anxious "chucks," announcing to all whom it might concern—after the fashion of some birds—that here was a stray infant to be ...
— In Nesting Time • Olive Thorne Miller

... struck off to the left of the road into the plain. Then after walking for nearly an hour longer, they came to a little dell with a pool at the bottom and bushes growing on its sides, and here Tilsa stopped. The two children lay down together under a bush and at once ...
— The Flamp, The Ameliorator, and The Schoolboy's Apprentice • E. V. Lucas

... Tom. "As soon as I get both legs ashore, I'm going to shoe my heels, and button my ears behind me, and start off into the bush, a straight course, and not stop till I'm out of the sight of ...
— Two Years Before the Mast • Richard Henry Dana

... the best of it. Oh, dear Miss Grant—Mary—this is a bad time to ask a favour, I know, when my husband's just come a cropper with your money, as well as his own; but I was never one to beat about the bush. And you're a regular brick. You're in luck, and we're out—down and out! I wonder—would you be inclined to lend us—say, a thousand pounds, just to tide over the few weeks till our dividends come? We'd give you ...
— The Guests Of Hercules • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... believe there is an Indian creeping up behind a bush." Joe says, "Bill, get up and see what it is. My eyes are not as good in the night ...
— Christopher Carson • John S. C. Abbott

... Jurabie himself would run away from it!' I know not the extent of Satanic endurance, but for a mere mortal to bear with it is impossible, as I once found by experience, when it compelled me to take refuge in the bush. ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 449 - Volume 18, New Series, August 7, 1852 • Various

... into hills covered with the noblest timber, wreathed with gigantic creepers. Cream-colored pigeons flit from tree to tree, and an eagle or two soared aloft watching their motions. Frigate-birds are numerous; and several sorts of smaller birds in the bush, difficult to get at. A small species of crocodile, or alligator, was likewise seen: but we were not fortunate enough to shoot one. The natives, when asked whether they were alligators, answered in the negative, calling them crocodiles. The tides appear to be as irregular ...
— The Expedition to Borneo of H.M.S. Dido - For the Suppression of Piracy • Henry Keppel

... sir, but the man is not in the moone, and my bush is before me, ergo, not at my backe, et ergo, ...
— A Collection Of Old English Plays, Vol. IV. • Editor: A.H. Bullen

... left it—buried under the rose-bush nearest the postern itself. But the first thing is, to get out of the room in ...
— The Bright Face of Danger • Robert Neilson Stephens

... the show would begin—Beryl Mae in her high, innocent voice had just said to the poet: 'But seriously now, are you sincere?' and I was getting some plenty of that, when up the road in the dusk I seen Bush Jones driving a dray-load of furniture. I wondered where in time any family could be moving out that way. I didn't know any houses beyond the club and I was pondering about this, idly as you might say, when Bush Jones pulls his team up right in front of the clubhouse, and ...
— Somewhere in Red Gap • Harry Leon Wilson

... earth is she afraid of, then? Tell me plainly, without any more beating about the bush," said the prince, exasperated by ...
— The Idiot • (AKA Feodor Dostoevsky) Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... herself, "I am sure Freshitt Hall would have been pleasanter than this." She thought of the white freestone, the pillared portico, and the terrace full of flowers, Sir James smiling above them like a prince issuing from his enchantment in a rose-bush, with a handkerchief swiftly metamorphosed from the most delicately odorous petals—Sir James, who talked so agreeably, always about things which had common-sense in them, and not about learning! Celia had those light young feminine tastes which grave and weatherworn gentlemen ...
— Middlemarch • George Eliot

... foot, were despatched to scour the bush round the settlement. Burgess, confident from the reply of the Signal Hill semaphore, that the alarm had been given at Eaglehawk Isthmus, promised himself the re-capture of the gang before many hours; and, giving orders to keep the communications going, retired to dinner. ...
— For the Term of His Natural Life • Marcus Clarke

... from the glazed bookcase, of which I kept the key, a volume whose title promised some interest, I sat down to read. The glass-door of this "classe," or schoolroom, opened into the large berceau; acacia-boughs caressed its panes, as they stretched across to meet a rose-bush blooming by the opposite lintel: in this rose-bush bees murmured busy and happy. I commenced reading. Just as the stilly hum, the embowering shade, the warm, lonely calm of my retreat were beginning to steal meaning from the page, vision from my eyes, and to lure me along the track of reverie, ...
— Villette • Charlotte Bronte



Words linked to "Bush" :   Brunfelsia americana, belvedere, Madagascar plum, laurel sumac, Cytisus ramentaceus, Brugmansia suaveolens, staggerbush, blackberry bush, Chinese angelica, dog hobble, Christmas berry, bush league, Lepechinia calycina, Anadenanthera colubrina, Brugmansia arborea, leadwort, Hercules'-club, Francoa ramosa, hawthorn, lawyer bush, Brugmansia sanguinea, honeybells, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, American spicebush, dombeya, woody plant, Combretum bracteosum, maikoa, Bassia scoparia, jujube bush, needle bush, beat around the bush, Kochia scoparia, Kolkwitzia amabilis, chaparral broom, Flacourtia indica, black greasewood, butterfly bush, bladder senna, Lysiloma sabicu, chalice vine, Malosma laurina, angel's trumpet, President George W. Bush, California beauty, fever tree, honeysuckle, Cytesis proliferus, Lupinus arboreus, Indigofera tinctoria, hollygrape, President Bush, bush willow, Apalachicola rosemary, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, Leitneria floridana, crystal tea, juniper, carissa, coca plant, lomatia, kelpwort, shrub, fetterbush, Christmas bush, George W. Bush, Cineraria maritima, bush out, flame bush, hoary golden bush, crowberry, impala lily, Dacridium laxifolius, groundsel bush, elderberry bush, Leucothoe racemosa, African hemp, leatherleaf, flannelbush, European cranberry bush, Comptonia peregrina, Geoffroea decorticans, indigo, catjang pea, maleberry, clianthus, barberry, cranberry tree, bitter pea, blue cohosh, daisy-bush, cranberry, lavender, coca, spicebush, Bauhinia monandra, leatherwood, Lyonia ligustrina, Genista raetam, boysenberry bush, bushman's poison, Labrador tea, cinquefoil, gardenia, corkwood, boxwood, coralberry, consumption weed, leucothoe, stingaree-bush, bush baby, bush hibiscus, dog laurel, bush leaguer, flannel bush, quince bush, frangipani, cajan pea, Vannevar Bush, capsicum pepper plant, Hermannia verticillata, Chilean hazelnut, butcher's broom, bean trefoil, Indian currant, honey-flower, Astroloma humifusum, capsicum, guelder rose, castor bean plant, Mahonia aquifolium, flame pea, Caesalpinia sepiaria, Cestrum nocturnum, Chamaecytisus palmensis, flowering hazel, mallow, beauty bush, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, Brazilian potato tree, furnish, rosebush, bush jacket, common flat pea, cotoneaster, Chile hazel, Benjamin bush, huckleberry oak, Codariocalyx motorius, buckler mustard, he-huckleberry, Baccharis viminea, cranberry heath, hamelia, Japanese allspice, bush violet, Bush administration, gorse, Codiaeum variegatum, climbing hydrangea, Indian rhododendron, barilla, Chimonanthus praecox, California redbud, feijoa, joewood, Euonymus atropurpureus, Chilean nut, silver-bush, oriental bush cherry, desert willow, barbasco, currant bush, coffee rose, flat pea, andromeda, fetter bush, bushing, forsythia, Acocanthera oblongifolia, George H.W. Bush, Ledum palustre, Ledum groenlandicum, bush bean, cat's-claw, bitter-bark, Jew bush, fothergilla, camellia, kapuka, Euonymus americanus, Ardisia crenata, George Walker Bush, fire thorn, chaparral, pubic hair, Cercis occidentalis, stagger bush, poison bush, bracelet wood, cotton-seed tree, high-bush blueberry, arrow wood, creosote bush, Aralia elata, Batis maritima, greasewood, ringworm bush, Aspalathus linearis, ground-berry, smoke bush, needlebush, calico bush, fire bush, Kiggelaria africana, lentisk, box, Australian heath, Datura suaveolens, daisybush, Canella winterana, crape jasmine, lotus tree, corkwood tree, fire-bush, Jerusalem thorn, Ilex cornuta, casava, Leycesteria formosa, indigo plant, bean caper, blueberry root, minnie bush, Lyonia lucida, artemisia, gooseberry, Caulophyllum thalictroides, Dubyuh, juneberry, Brassaia actinophylla, Adam's apple, shadbush, coronilla, Mahernia verticillata, quail bush, Dovyalis caffra, Jew-bush, groundberry, Embothrium coccineum, caragana, Diervilla lonicera, Aralia stipulata, makomako, glandular Labrador tea, cotton plant, Halimodendron halodendron, saltbush, black-fronted bush shrike, scrub, chaparral pea, desert rose, Guevina avellana, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Comptonia asplenifolia, eggplant bush, hovea, supply, Irish gorse, honey bell, alpine totara, Chinese angelica tree, Georgia bark, bird's-eye bush, Dalea spinosa, Christ's-thorn, abelia, caricature plant, Anthyllis barba-jovis, Adenium obesum, George Bush, candlewood, Leucothoe editorum, crepe flower, Croton tiglium, grevillea, beach plum bush, Cajanus cajan



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