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Bush   Listen
noun
Bush  n.  
1.
A thicket, or place abounding in trees or shrubs; a wild forest. Note: This was the original sense of the word, as in the Dutch bosch, a wood, and was so used by Chaucer. In this sense it is extensively used in the British colonies, especially at the Cape of Good Hope, and also in Australia and Canada; as, to live or settle in the bush.
2.
A shrub; esp., a shrub with branches rising from or near the root; a thick shrub or a cluster of shrubs. "To bind a bush of thorns among sweet-smelling flowers."
3.
A shrub cut off, or a shrublike branch of a tree; as, bushes to support pea vines.
4.
A shrub or branch, properly, a branch of ivy (as sacred to Bacchus), hung out at vintners' doors, or as a tavern sign; hence, a tavern sign, and symbolically, the tavern itself. "If it be true that good wine needs no bush, 't is true that a good play needs no epilogue."
5.
(Hunting) The tail, or brush, of a fox.
To beat about the bush, to approach anything in a round-about manner, instead of coming directly to it; a metaphor taken from hunting.
Bush bean (Bot.), a variety of bean which is low and requires no support (Phaseolus vulgaris, variety nanus). See Bean, 1.
Bush buck, or Bush goat (Zool.), a beautiful South African antelope (Tragelaphus sylvaticus); so called because found mainly in wooden localities. The name is also applied to other species.
Bush cat (Zool.), the serval. See Serval.
Bush chat (Zool.), a bird of the genus Pratincola, of the Thrush family.
Bush dog. (Zool.) See Potto.
Bush hammer. See Bushhammer in the Vocabulary.
Bush harrow (Agric.) See under Harrow.
Bush hog (Zool.), a South African wild hog (Potamochoerus Africanus); called also bush pig, and water hog.
Bush master (Zool.), a venomous snake (Lachesis mutus) of Guinea; called also surucucu.
Bush pea (Bot.), a variety of pea that needs to be bushed.
Bush shrike (Zool.), a bird of the genus Thamnophilus, and allied genera; called also batarg. Many species inhabit tropical America.
Bush tit (Zool.), a small bird of the genus Psaltriparus, allied to the titmouse. Psaltriparus minimus inhabits California.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... Hy Smith, also. He flagged a train about a mile out of town and hopped aboard. I come out of the bush and took the last car, telling the brakie a much-needed man had got on forward. Also, I took the Con. into my confidence. So just when we pulled into the next town I steps behind Mr. Troy, puts a gun against ...
— Red Saunders' Pets and Other Critters • Henry Wallace Phillips

... of explanation to the guard, demanded the surrender of the prisoner. The demand was conceded with scarcely a word of protest, and five minutes later the miserable Alvaros, in a speechless frenzy of fear, was being hurried along a lonely bush path, known only to the negroes, to a spot some three miles distant. What happened to him when he arrived there must be left untold; suffice it to say that Major Alvaros was never more seen of men, and the mystery of his disappearance remains unsolved to this day, although Carlos ...
— The Cruise of the Thetis - A Tale of the Cuban Insurrection • Harry Collingwood

... glance for the fish: his attention was taken up by the mass of precipitous stone before him, so steep, that it was only here and there, in cracks or on ledges, that herb or stunted bush could find a place to root; and as he scanned the precipice, from its foot among the beeches, to its brow, five hundred feet above where he sat, he wondered whether the ravens ...
— The Black Tor - A Tale of the Reign of James the First • George Manville Fenn

... apply at my former hotel, La Clef de Surete. And gay as a hunchback who's just drowned his wife! Gautruche, called Gogo-la-Gaiete, egad! A pretty fellow who knows what's what, who doesn't beat about the bush, a good old body who takes things easy and who won't give himself the colic with that fishes' grog!" With that he took a bottle of water that stood beside him and hurled it twenty yards away. "Long live the walls! They're the same to papa that the sky is to the good God! Gogo-la-Gaiete ...
— Germinie Lacerteux • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt

... came upon the first sage-bush which we had seen. It was queer gray stuff, shaped like miniature trees, and had the appearance of being able to get along ...
— The Voyage of the Rattletrap • Hayden Carruth

... you? Wood-thrush came from north, where the tailoring began; and he saw it, and told you. It is a sign for him to be up and flying. He thought it would be his excuse for declining your invitation, instead of which you all went thrusting your heads into a bramble-bush. ...
— Our Young Folks, Vol 1, No. 1 - An Illustrated Magazine • Various

... I got into was a lady and her two grown-up daughters, and a son of about five-and-twenty. They lived in a small house at Shepherd's Bush. My wages were very small, and I soon found out that they were a kind of people who keep up a great deal of show on very little means. Of course I had to be let into all the secrets of their miserable shifts for dressing well on next to nothing at all, and they expected me—mother and ...
— The Unclassed • George Gissing

... Although he knew that the wilds of Sicily were frequently infested with banditti, his numbers made him fearless of attack. Not so his attendants, many of whom, as the darkness increased, testified emotions not very honourable to their courage: starting at every bush, and believing it concealed a murderer. They endeavoured to dissuade the duke from proceeding, expressing uncertainty of their being in the right route, and recommending the open plains. But the duke, whose eye had been vigilant to mark the flight of the fugitives, and who was not to ...
— A Sicilian Romance • Ann Radcliffe

... weighing took but an instant. Dunwoodie was living in the past, but there was no use in beating about the bush and he said ...
— The Paliser case • Edgar Saltus

... always try to profit by my superiors. She has courage: I have none. I beat about the bush, and talk skim-milk; she uses the very word. She said we have been the dupe and the tool of a little scheming rascal, an anonymous coward, with motives as base as his heart is black—oh! oh! Ay, that is the way to speak of such a man; I can't do it myself, but I reverence the brave lady ...
— A Terrible Temptation - A Story of To-Day • Charles Reade

... geographical distribution of this grass is remarkable, being confined to the Tristan group and Gough Island, and the Islands of St. Paul and Amsterdam in the Indian Ocean, 3,000 miles distant" (Blue-book). 3. Flax. 4. Willow, a few trees on the settlement only. 5. Ferns and Mosses. 6. Prickle-bush, Gorse. A few bushes only near the houses. 7. Crowberry (Empetrum nigrum). 8. Nertera, bearing scarlet berries. 9. Blackberry. Scanty. 10. Cape-gooseberry. Once plentiful, now scarce. 11. Tea-plant (Chenopodium Tomentosum). 12. Wild Celery. 13. Large Field-Daisy. 14. Geranium (Pelargonium ...
— Three Years in Tristan da Cunha • K. M. Barrow

... rose bush wot I took the liberty of buyin' for you, sir, bein' as you give me ten shillin's for myself," said Dollops sheepishly. "I been a-keepin' of my eye on that rose bush and that necktie for a week past, sir. I 'ope you'll take 'em, Gov'nor, and ...
— Cleek: the Man of the Forty Faces • Thomas W. Hanshew

... Australia,[31] when the boys are assembled an old man dressed in stringy bark fibre lies down in a grave. He is covered up lightly with sticks and earth, and the grave is smoothed over. The buried man holds in his hand a small bush which seems to be growing from the ground, and other bushes are stuck in the ground round about. The novices are then brought to the edge of the grave and a song is sung. Gradually, as the song goes on, ...
— Ancient Art and Ritual • Jane Ellen Harrison

... earthquake and flood, but dark for centuries with the immovable shades of a virgin tropical forest. The Great House, with its spacious open galleries and verandahs, was surrounded with stone terraces, overflowing with the intense red and orange of the hybiscus and croton bush, the golden browns and softer yellows of less ambitious plants, the sensuous tints of the orchid, the high and glittering beauties of the palm and cocoanut. The slopes to the coast were covered with cane-fields, their bright young ...
— The Conqueror • Gertrude Franklin Atherton

... sharply to my left as if restrained by the command of some one behind the canes. The Federal's cool daring filled me with admiration. Had the foes he was looking for been actually in hiding here they could have picked him out of his saddle like a bird off a bush. His only chance was that they would not let themselves be teased into firing prematurely on any one man or six. Ferry beckoned me. I mounted and trotted down the woods side of the fence, at the same time the Federal's six men approached from three directions, and down the ...
— The Cavalier • George Washington Cable

... sun sunk below the horizon, and the light slowly died out. Rico arose, and passed along the road towards the red flowers. A narrow lane branched off from the main road at this place. There they stood, one bush after another: it looked like a great garden. There was, truly, only an open fence about the whole; and within the flowers, the trees, and the grape-vines were all ...
— Rico And Wiseli - Rico And Stineli, And How Wiseli Was Provided For • Johanna Spyri

... minute. Who was the libelous wretch who said that the flowers of California had no perfume and the birds there had no song? Where we passed through tangled woods the odors distilled from the wild flowers by the sun's warmth were often almost suffocating in their sweetness; and in a yellow-tufted bush on the lawn at Coronado I came upon a mocking-bird singing in a way to make his brother minstrel of Mobile or Savannah feel like applying for admission to a school of expression and learning the ...
— Roughing it De Luxe • Irvin S. Cobb

... guide did not enjoy his task. Shortly after we started, the moon rose and, from its shining full on the light sand, it was almost as bright as day. We were in single file, our guide, Herman, and I. At sight of every bush or indistinct object, our guide clutched his club and crossed himself, as he mumbled a prayer. When we met anyone, we kept strictly to our side of the road, they to theirs, and, in passing, barely exchanged a word of greeting. The timidity and ...
— In Indian Mexico (1908) • Frederick Starr

... half an hour, and assuring himself that Bill was well off, Fred began an advance, working his way from bush to bush until convinced he could approach no nearer ...
— Down the Slope • James Otis

... presence of mind, or, at least, of his usual power of conversation. He had brought his daughter out there with the express purpose of saying to her a special word or two; he had beat very wide about the bush with the view of mentioning a certain name; and now that his daughter was there, and the name had been mentioned, it seemed that he hardly knew how ...
— Orley Farm • Anthony Trollope

... was accused by public rumor of irregularities in office. A customs employee having been discharged for spreading the rumor, called on the collector and invited him to a meeting outside; and the two adjourned to the bush, where shots were exchanged and young Morales was wounded in the leg. The aggressor was immediately seized by the general commanding the military forces in Sanchez and carried to the town cemetery, a grave was dug, and the general prepared to have him summarily shot. ...
— Santo Domingo - A Country With A Future • Otto Schoenrich

... "tell us what you know of the elk. It will pass the time. Norman says it's no use going after them out there in the open ground, as they'd shy off before one could get within shot. You see there is not a bush within half-a-mile ...
— Popular Adventure Tales • Mayne Reid

... but more than all a gradual growth of such moral power as would be commanding in the redeeming self-sacrifice and love of Jesus Christ. Every page of the Old Testament was only preparatory, as the thorny bush is preparatory for the rose. Christ is the end of the long, weary human history that leads to Him. If the laws of Sinai had been enough, there never would have been a Calvary. No one for a moment dreams that the God of nature could have brought forth such a fruit as the life and ideas of ...
— The World's Great Sermons, Volume 10 (of 10) • Various

... Caermarthen and Llangunnor church, which is situate on a hill commanding extensive views of one of the prettiest values in Wales. A field near the house is pointed out as the site of Steele's garden, in the bower of which he is said to have written his "Conscious Lovers." The Ivy Bush, formerly a private house, and said to be the house where Steele died, is now the principal inn ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 56, November 23, 1850 • Various

... we'se all a leanin' on you. We'se nothin' but vines a climbin' up de orange-bush. If you goes down, we all does. And now, Miss Edie, I'd swallow pison for you. Won't you take a cup o' tea for de sake of ole Hannibal? 'Cause your sweet face looks so pinched, honey, dat I feels dat ...
— What Can She Do? • Edward Payson Roe

... carried on a commonplace romance with a pretty little girl whose acquaintance he made one evening at a public fete. Louison was twenty years old, and earned her living at a famous florist's, and was as pink and fresh as an almond-bush in April. She had had only two lovers, gay fellows—an art student first—then a clerk in a novelty store, who had given her the not very aristocratic taste for boating. It was on the Marne, seated near Louison in a boat moored to the willows on the Ile d'Amour, that Amedee obtained ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... monument; she's been coming every cold weather for ten years, poor old Rosy. Don't you think you could do her a bit of an interview for Wednesday's paper? She'll write up very well—get her on variety entertainments in the Australian bush." ...
— The Path of a Star • Mrs. Everard Cotes (AKA Sara Jeannette Duncan)

... We know the type elsewhere; and there is a curious lateral allusion to it by Dante when Jacopo di Sant' Andrea, who had ruined himself by profusion and committed suicide, scatters the leaves of the bush of Lotto degli Agli, endeavouring to hide himself among them. We shall hereafter examine the type completely; here I will only give an approximate rendering of Homer's words, which have been obscured more by translation ...
— The Crown of Wild Olive • John Ruskin

... door. His eye was one that the casual observer would describe as 'full of mischief;' but behind the sunny brightness was a pensive cast. He walked softly towards the arbour, and stood for several seconds looking at its beautiful occupant. Then, in moving his foot, the dry branch of a rose-bush snapped, and the ...
— The Four Canadian Highwaymen • Joseph Edmund Collins

... stalk left with which to fasten them, and so the poor rose fell upon the ground, and the little girl impatiently snatched at another and dragged it ruthlessly from the branch. This went on for some time, and would probably have gone on until not a flower remained upon the bush, had not Sophie again made herself heard ...
— Naughty Miss Bunny - A Story for Little Children • Clara Mulholland

... queen's diamonds. There were huckleberry-pastures on the lower flanks of The Mountain, with plenty of the sweet-scented bayberry mingled with the other bushes. In other fields grew great store of high-bush blackberries. Along the roadside were bayberry-bushes, hung all over with bright red coral pendants in autumn and far into the winter. Then there were swamps set thick with dingy alders, where the three-leaved ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... the cushats from a neighboring bush. They used to build their nests on the ground, so the story goes, but the cows trampled them. Now they are wiser and build higher, and their cry is supposed to be a derisive one, directed to their ancient enemies, "Come noo, ...
— Penelope's Progress - Being Such Extracts from the Commonplace Book of Penelope Hamilton As Relate to Her Experiences in Scotland • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... involved more peril, for with a fierce oath that he would be revenged on the Whiggish imp, the lad darted at the tree, in vain, however, for Peregrine had dropped down on the other side, and crept unseen to another bush, where he lay perdu, under the thick green branches, rod and all, while the youth, swearing and growling, ...
— A Reputed Changeling • Charlotte M. Yonge

... and verdureless. The scanty grasses were long ago turned into sun-cured hay by the fierce summer heats. There is neither tree nor bush, the sky is grey, the earth buff, the air blae and windy, and clouds of coarse granitic dust sweep across the prairie and smother the settlement. Cheyenne is described as "a God-forsaken, God-forgotten place." That it forgets God is written on its face. It owes ...
— A Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains • Isabella L. Bird

... them just yet. Let's have a run first. Let's see which of us will get to the middle bush first—you go right and I'll ...
— Rosy • Mrs. Molesworth

... senses, she found herself lying under a bush in her own proper form. What had befallen her, and how she got there, lay behind her like ...
— The Violet Fairy Book • Various

... where I left it—buried under the rose-bush nearest the postern itself. But the first thing is, to get out of ...
— The Bright Face of Danger • Robert Neilson Stephens

... most wearisome and uninteresting chases, through the mazes of the London streets, he ever remembers to have made. Up Notting Hill, down the slums of Notting Dale, along the High Street, beyond Hammersmith, and through Shepherd's Bush did that anonymous tramp lead the unfortunate detective, never hurrying himself, stopping every now and then at a public-house to get a drink, whither Mr. Howard did not always ...
— The Old Man in the Corner • Baroness Orczy

... Patch, and after he had given the letter to his mother he hopped out on the Sunny Meadow, and just then, all of a sudden, Old Professor Jim Crow flew by. He had his little Black Book under his wing, and as soon as he saw the little rabbit he lighted on a bush and turned ...
— Little Jack Rabbit and the Squirrel Brothers • David Cory

... bank-notes, which the wind threatened to take off into the sea before the boy's astonished senses returned to him. Ben prevented such a disaster, however, by picking up the roll and placing it in Noll's hand, with, "It's worth savin', lad, fur 'tain't every bush that ...
— Culm Rock - The Story of a Year: What it Brought and What it Taught • Glance Gaylord

... of battle grew more distant as our troops on shore advanced. It broke out like a bush-fire, and spread from one section to another. Mechanical Death pressed forward across the Salt Lake. It stormed the heights of the Kapanja Sirt on the one side, and took Lala Baba on the other. Puffs ...
— At Suvla Bay • John Hargrave

... barn, and hay stack were close in front, with only a narrow strip of garden between, for there was not much heed paid to flowers, and few kitchen vegetables were grown in those days, only a few potherbs round the door, and a sweet-brier bush by the window. ...
— Under the Storm - Steadfast's Charge • Charlotte M. Yonge

... They soon found out, however, that the princess was missing, and in a moment the palace was like a beehive in a garden; and in one minute more the queen was brought to herself by a great shout and a clapping of hands. They had found the princess fast asleep under a rose-bush, to which the elfish little wind-puff had carried her, finishing its mischief by shaking a shower of red rose-leaves all over the little white sleeper. Startled by the noise the servants made, she woke, and, furious with glee, scattered the rose-leaves in all directions, like a shower of ...
— Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know • Various

... horrible blast of wind; his blood lost consciousness. But in the second of suspension he saw the heavy shell swoop to earth, into the rocky bushes on the right, and earth and stones poured up into the sky. It was as if he heard no sound. The earth and stones and fragments of bush fell to earth again, and there was the same unchanging peace. The Germans had ...
— England, My England • D.H. Lawrence

... Byng; "see him there on the bush with pink blossoms. He's all black except his bill, and that looks as if it had been dipped in an ...
— The King In Yellow • Robert W. Chambers

... the ground with him. Jacky's eyes were playing and sparkling all the time in search of signs. Nothing clear was discovered. Then at Jacky's request they rode off George's feeding-ground altogether and made for a little wood about two miles distant. "Suppose you stop here, I go in the bush," ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade

... a hallucination? I turned round to look for the stalk, and I found it immediately under the bush, freshly broken, between two other roses which remained on the branch, and I returned home then, with a much disturbed mind; for I am certain now, as certain as I am of the alternation of day and night, that there exists close ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Vol. 1 (of 8) - Boule de Suif and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant

... every little muscle, and said to herself in her Spartan manner, "I can bear it without either wincing or blenching." She went home early, at a tearing, passionate pace, trampling and breaking through all obstacles of briar or bush. Willie was moping in her absence—hanging listlessly on the farm-yard gate to watch for her. When he saw her, he set up one of his strange, inarticulate cries, of which she was now learning the meaning, and came towards her ...
— Half a Life-Time Ago • Elizabeth Gaskell

... grown by nature itself upon the well-dressed wearer. Be like him—be like her—so runs the third head of the etiquette-card. Be not slovenly and disorderly and unseemly in your livery. Let not your livery be always falling off, and catching on every bush and briar, and dropping into every pool and ditch. Hold yourselves in hand, the instruction goes on. Brace yourselves up. Have your temper, your tongue, your eyes, your ears, and all your members in control. And then you will escape many a rent and many a rag; many a seam and many a ...
— Bunyan Characters - Third Series - The Holy War • Alexander Whyte

... sweet, as well say to these apple blossoms that they need never be apples, and to that rose-bush against the wall that its buds need not be roses. In faith, we be far set in that course of nature, dear, with the apple blossoms and the rose-buds, where the beginning cannot be without the end. Our own motion be lost, and we be swept along with a current ...
— Giles Corey, Yeoman - A Play • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... The rose-bush, planted with such tearful care, Stands in the winter sunshine stiff and bare; Save here and there its lingering berries red Make the cold sunbeams warm above ...
— Purgatory • Mary Anne Madden Sadlier

... a clown in blue, Walks like a two-legged bush of may, With the little wee lads that wriggled up the flue Ere Cheltenham town ...
— The New Morning - Poems • Alfred Noyes

... The Bush Summer Crookneck is generally esteemed the finest of the summer varieties. It is used only while young and tender, or when the skin can be easily pierced or broken by the nail. After the fruit hardens, ...
— The Field and Garden Vegetables of America • Fearing Burr

... crammed with heaven, And every common bush afire with God; But only he who sees, ...
— Education and the Higher Life • J. L. Spalding

... Papeiha." And with that he threw down the god at the feet of the teachers. One of them ran and brought a saw, and first cut off its head and then sawed it into logs. Some of the Rarotongans rushed away in dread. Others—even some of the newly converted Christians—hid in the bush and peered through the leaves to see what would happen. Papeiha lit a fire; the logs were thrown on; the first ...
— The Book of Missionary Heroes • Basil Mathews

... you agree," said the King of Ireland's son. He sat under the bush beside him and they played again. The King of ...
— The King of Ireland's Son • Padraic Colum

... work by day time, throwing earth out of their trenches. You could see on the snow on the parapet, so I sent them four rounds with my compliments and they then saw their mistake and stopped. I then watched their return of compliments with a battery of field guns; they were quite cruel to a small bush a hundred yards behind our line. I thought it rather a funny object to vent their spleen on. Yesterday I inspected the whole of the brigade trenches to see where I could make myself unpleasant to Fritz, and to-day we started making a beautiful emplacement ...
— Letters from France • Isaac Alexander Mack

... of the impartial few: (We stand in England, mind you!) Fashion too Favors Geminiani—of those choice Concertos: nor there wants a certain voice Raised in thy favor likewise, famed Pepusch Dear to our great-grandfathers! In a bush Of Doctor's wig, they prized thee timing beats While Greenway trilled "Alexis." Such were feats Of music in thy day—dispute who ...
— Browning's England - A Study in English Influences in Browning • Helen Archibald Clarke

... stands a tent and before it a saddled horse. From the tent steps forth a man with large glowing eyes, dressed all in white, who is greeted by his followers with fanatical cries of Allah, Allah! He mounts his steed, the camels rise, and the long caravan swings slowly out of sight and disappears in the bush. Once more dead silence reigns in the African jungle. Whither are they going? You don't know; you see only a rider dressed in a white burnoose, only a few dozen men hailing a prophet, but in the very same moment in which you see only a sheik ...
— Banzai! • Ferdinand Heinrich Grautoff

... he stood upon its dark-seamed summit, and he went cautiously to the verge and looked down at the many ledges. They jutted out at irregular intervals, the first only six feet below, and all accessible enough to an expert climber. A bush grew in a niche. An empty nest, riddled by the wind, hung dishevelled from a twig. Coarse withered grass ...
— 'way Down In Lonesome Cove - 1895 • Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)

... behind some rising ground the effect was always picturesque. The valley was charming after so much desert, for it was long since we had seen a good tree. The principal one in Cheyenne was not larger than a lilac-bush, and had to be kept wrapped in wet towels. The light vivid tints of the box-elder contrasted well with the silvery willows and cottonwoods, and still better with the long rows of sage-brush in the foreground and the yellowish cliffs behind. ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 15, - No. 90, June, 1875 • Various

... lament, and as a last favour, he requested this of the Gods above, that he might mourn for ever. And now, his blood quite exhausted by incessant weeping, his limbs began to be changed into a green colour, and the hair, which but lately hung from his snow-white forehead, to become a rough bush, and, a stiffness being assumed, to point to the starry heavens with a tapering top. The God {Phoebus} lamented deeply, and in his sorrow he said, "Thou shalt be mourned by me, and shalt mourn for others, and shalt {ever} attend upon those who are sorrowing[23] ...
— The Metamorphoses of Ovid - Literally Translated into English Prose, with Copious Notes - and Explanations • Publius Ovidius Naso

... again, himself, as though he were going to seek them, but, as soon as he was out of sight, he hid behind a bush, and watched the road along which the woman he still loved so dearly would be brought dead or dying, or perhaps maimed and disfigured for life. In a little while a cart passed by, bearing a strange load; it drew up before the chateau-gates, then passed through them. ...
— The works of Guy de Maupassant, Vol. 5 (of 8) - Une Vie and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant 1850-1893

... looking at him with an air full of contempt. "Tell me once for all," asked the latter, "tell me one way or other, whether I am in your opinion an object for suspicion? Speak up, Porphyrius Petrovitch, and explain yourself without any more beating about the bush, ...
— The Most Interesting Stories of All Nations • Julian Hawthorne

... presence of the savage creatures she had summoned. The deep blue eyes were alert and watchful, but she showed no signs of fear; nor did she move. Suddenly a less stealthy and more certain crackling of the bush made itself heard; and the roving eyes became fixed in one direction. Beneath the shadow of the laden boughs a tall grey figure appeared moving towards her. But this was not all, for several slinking, stealing forms were moving about amongst the barren tree-trunks; hungry-looking ...
— In the Brooding Wild • Ridgwell Cullum

... maiden was sitting on the brink of the ravine, pondering on the old legend and peering down into the deep below. It was not the first time she had found her way hither, where but seldom a human foot had dared to tread. To her every alder and bramble-bush, that clothed the naked wall of the rock, were as familiar as were the knots and veins in the ceiling of the chamber where from her childhood she had slept; and as she sat there on the brink of the precipice, the late summer sun threw its red lustre upon her and upon the fogs that came ...
— Tales From Two Hemispheres • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... But there was a bee in the bush here. I—I didn't mean to...." The fright had been too much. Tears started in David's eyes, and ...
— David and the Phoenix • Edward Ormondroyd

... never written a better story than "A Millionaire of Yesterday." He grips the reader's attention at the start by his vivid picture of the two men in the West African bush making a grim fight for life and fortune, and he holds it to the finish. The volume is thrilling throughout, while ...
— A Lost Leader • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... said: "On this expedition I went all the way to Jordan and swam across the river. On the edge of the river there is a bush of willows, and there I twisted a knot of willows, and said this knot thou shouldst untie, brother, or take the ...
— Heimskringla - The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway • Snorri Sturluson

... that paid for all things, 'Twas others drank the wine, I cannot now recall things; Live but a fool, to pine. 'Twas I that beat the bush, The bird to others flew; For she, alas, hath ...
— A History of English Literature - Elizabethan Literature • George Saintsbury

... I wouldn't, my lord. I won't be denying it. But, on the other hand, I wouldn't marry her now for all her money, av' I didn't mane to trate her well. Well, my lord, after beating about the bush for a long time, the ould thief popped it out, and told me that he thought Anty'd be all the betther for a husband; and that, av' I was wanting a wife, he b'lieved I might suit myself now. Well, I thought of it a little, and tould him I'd take the hint. The next day he comes to me ...
— The Kellys and the O'Kellys • Anthony Trollope

... night-shift that week. I know he sleeps sound, for I've heard their Betty say as it were the only thing as kept 'em up, that they slept both on 'em so well. Suppose, then, as we gets a goodish-sized furze bush or two, and goes round to the back about two o'clock in the morning. We must have a rope or two; then we must take off our clogs, and climb up by the water-butt. The one as goes up first must have a dark lantern. Well, ...
— Frank Oldfield - Lost and Found • T.P. Wilson

... it was settled he went straight to Martha's grave and staid there all the afternoon, and did a little gardening around it, and trained the rose-bush around the head-stone, and picking a half open blossom, put it in his button-hole and silently apostrophized the dead woman at his feet, telling her that though he was about to bring a new mistress to the home ...
— Bessie's Fortune - A Novel • Mary J. Holmes

... the ground, and Willy beside her. Without speaking, she hurried back to seek for Fred, her steps swifter than they had ever before been, though to herself it seemed as if her feet were of lead, and the very throbbing of her heart dragged her back. In every bush she fancied she saw Fred coming to meet her, but it was only for a moment, and at length she saw him but too plainly. He was stretched at full length on the ground, senseless—motionless. She sank ...
— Henrietta's Wish • Charlotte M. Yonge

... he flew over the sea to distant lands, where there were great forests, deep lakes, lofty mountains, and proud cities. Wherever he came it seemed as if sunshine travelled with him across the fields, for every flower, every bush, exhaled a renewed fragrance, as if conscious that a friend and protector was near; one who understood them, and knew their value. The stunted rose-bush shot forth twigs, unfolded its leaves, and bore the most beautiful roses; ...
— Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen • Hans Christian Andersen

... out at e'en, Or walk at morning air, Ilk rustling bush will seem to say I used to meet thee there: Then I'll sit down and cry, And live aneath the tree, And when a leaf fa's i' my lap, I'll ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... itself, cannot find expression other than gracious. In the presence of another, a man of true breeding is but faintly aware of his own self, and keenly aware of the other's self. Before the human—that bush which, however trodden and peeled, yet burns with the divine presence—the man who thinks of the homage due to him, and not of the homage owing by him, is essentially rude. Mammon is slowly stifling and desiccating Rank; both are miserable deities, but the one is yet meaner than the ...
— What's Mine's Mine • George MacDonald

... arrived about six months before, was the result; that he had not been more than a month in the country when he and several other convicts ran away from the master to whom they had been assigned, and took to the bush. Such was the brief but dismal history of this ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, XXII • various

... thousands, and the special idol of the bush-man! thou that soothest the dull moments of a weary solitude, and the anguish of a desponding spirit; that satisfiest the cravings of a consuming hunger; that alleviates the pains, brightens the intellects, and dispels illusion of the morbid fancies and ...
— Fern Vale (Volume 1) - or the Queensland Squatter • Colin Munro

... evening when the brother and sister walked up to the Folly in a partial clearing, when the evening sun made every bush twinkle all over with diamond drops. Childish voices were heard near the gate, and behind a dripping laurel were seen Elvira, Armine, and Barbara engaged in childhood's unceasing attempt to explore ...
— Magnum Bonum • Charlotte M. Yonge

... room, among many relics and souvenirs, there was a little, dry bush. It was a Jericho rose, brought back by Mamsell Fredrika from the far East. Now in the Christmas night it began to blossom quite of itself. The dry twigs were covered with red buds, which shone like sparks of fire and lighted the ...
— Invisible Links • Selma Lagerlof

... but, to tell the truth, I hardly missed him, so occupied was I by the short one, who remained leaning on the rail, thoughtfully contemplating the Dulcibella through gold-rimmed pince-nez: a sallow, wizened old fellow, beetlebrowed, with a bush of grizzled moustache and a jet-black tuft of beard on his chin. The most remarkable feature was the nose, which was broad and flat, merging almost imperceptibly in the wrinkled cheeks. Lightly beaked at the nether extremity, it drooped towards an enormous ...
— Riddle of the Sands • Erskine Childers

... commanded the waiter, pointing with his finger. "Wine over there. Wine to those three gents by that green bush. Tell 'em it's on me. D—n it! ...
— The Trimmed Lamp and Others • O Henry

... wife said, to see the discouraged shade which passed over her thin, tremulous features, when this certainty forced itself upon her. It is hard, when sinking in the waves, to see the frail bush at which the hand clutches uprooted; hard, when alone in the crowded thoroughfare of travel, to have one's last bank-note declared a counterfeit. I knew I should not be able to see her face, under the shade of this disappointment; ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 16, No. 97, November, 1865 • Various

... it does not rise into the air, but flies downward and disappears with a swish of its tail. The nest is usually built on the ground or in a low bush or tree. It is composed of grass, fine roots, or weed stems, and lined with fine grass or hair. The eggs are usually four or five, but sometimes there are as many as seven. They are white with a greenish-blue tint and are closely ...
— Ontario Teachers' Manuals: Nature Study • Ontario Ministry of Education

... followers of Bacchus, the old god of wine, we can understand how the corruption, "Bag o' Nails," arose. Before the days of licensing, when everyone could sell liquor who chose without obtaining any licence from the magistrates, it was the custom to put a bush over the doorway, in order to inform the passers-by that liquor could be purchased there. This is the origin of the saying, "Good ...
— English Villages • P. H. Ditchfield

... whose strength lay in his hair. One would think that the English were for placing all wisdom there. To appear wise nothing more is requisite here than for a man to borrow hair from the heads of all his neighbors and clap it like a bush on his own; the distributors of law and physic stick on such quantities that it is almost impossible, even in idea, to distinguish between ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IV (of X)—Great Britain and Ireland II • Various

... the untilled field of my heart Many simple buds are bursting. There is a little bush of kindliness towards all men. There is a slender tree of forgiveness for all wrongs. There is a humble growth of repentance for past sins. And around the field is a ...
— Song Book of Quong Lee of Limehouse • Thomas Burke

... Taking the iron knife which Martha handed him, he prayed over it, tied Mary's hair about it, uttered another prayer and turned toward the servant who had appeared with an ax. "Take thou this to the valley. Find there a thorn-bush aside from the pathway and there tie the iron knife by the hair of Mary and repeat the scripture which is on the scroll I give thee, and as the Lord appeared in a thorn-bush to Moses, so shall he appear again. And if thine eyes be holden that thou seest not ...
— The Coming of the King • Bernie Babcock

... over to that grampus," cried the lad, pretending to whimper. "I got the news from a feller, that said he'd got it from a feller, that saw a feller, who said he'd heard a feller tell another feller, that he saw a black feller in the bush, somewhere or other 'tween this and the other end o' the island, with a shot-hole in his right arm, running like a cogolampus, with ten pirates in full chase. Ah! oh! have mercy, Henry; really, my constitution will break down ...
— Gascoyne, The Sandal Wood Trader - A Tale of the Pacific • R. M. Ballantyne

... detachment. I gradually gathered from the Boers what I had already partially guessed, namely, that they had been fetched and guided all round our camp by friend Brink, had surrounded it in the dark, crawling about in the bush on the river bank, and had carefully marked down our two poor sentries. These they had at once shot on the alarm being given, and had then rushed the camp from the dense cover on three sides. Towards evening my head got worse, and its rhythmic throbbing seemed ...
— The Defence of Duffer's Drift • Ernest Dunlop Swinton

... more ago, the sun was about to set. As I knew that the diligence to Espalion would soon pass, I preferred to wait for it rather than to walk any farther. The south wind was blowing with such force that I lay down on the leeside of a bush to be sheltered from it. Here I watched the sun burning dimly in a yellow haze on the edge of the world. The wind wailed amongst the leaves of the hawthorn-bushes, but over the brown land, flushed with the sad yellow ...
— Wanderings by southern waters, eastern Aquitaine • Edward Harrison Barker

... felt on returning to a place so dear to me, and which I had not seen for many years; I ran hastily from one room to another; I traversed the garden with inexpressible eagerness: my eye devoured every object; there was not a tree, not a bush, which did not revive some pleasing, ...
— The History of Emily Montague • Frances Brooke

... beneath the foliage of the trees. Yet when we ceased speaking our ears caught a dull vibration, a continual murmur,—the hum of insects filling all the lower strata of the air, while a confused noise issued from every bush, from the decayed trunks of the trees, from the clefts of the rocks, and from the ground undermined by lizards, crickets, millipedes, and other creatures. Myriads of insects were creeping upon the soil and fluttering round the plants parched by the heat of the sun,—showing ...
— The Young Llanero - A Story of War and Wild Life in Venezuela • W.H.G. Kingston

... tanager which has got rid of its hoarseness. Presently he heard a note which he called that of the night-warbler, a bird he had never identified, had been in search of twelve years, which always, when he saw it, was in the act of diving down into a tree or bush, and which it was vain to seek; the only bird that sings indifferently by night and by day. I told him he must beware of finding and booking it, lest life should have nothing more to show him. He said, "What you seek in vain for, half your life, one day you come full upon all the family at ...
— Excursions • Henry D. Thoreau

... houses in the bush is generally by way of the yard where the horses arrive, and it is very unusual for anyone, except a stranger making a formal visit, to be allowed to find their way round to ...
— An Outback Marriage • Andrew Barton Paterson

... they came to it, lying in a hollow, and snugly sheltered by gently rising wooded ground. It was a very little village indeed. There was a small grey church with a stumpy square tower, and a cheerful red-brick inn called the Holly Bush, with a swinging sign in front of it; there were half a dozen little cottages with gay gardens, and, standing close to the road, there was a long, low, many-gabled house which was evidently the vicarage. It was such a snug, smiling little settlement altogether that Barney and ...
— Our Frank - and other stories • Amy Walton

... relief, at Winterbourne Bishop, to be in a country which had nothing to draw a man out of a town. A wide, empty land, with nothing on it to look at but a furze-bush; or when I had gained the summit of the down, and to get a little higher still stood on the top of one of its many barrows, a sight of the distant village, its low, grey or reddish-brown cottages half hidden among its few trees, the square, ...
— A Shepherd's Life • W. H. Hudson

... to find it still in flower. A hundred miles farther south I had seen it finishing its season a full month earlier. I stopped, of course, to pluck a blossom. At that moment a female redbird flew out of the bush. Her mate was beside her instantly, and a nameless something in their manner told me they were trying to keep a secret. The nest, built mainly of pine needles and other leaves, was in the middle of the bush, a foot or two from the grass, and contained ...
— A Florida Sketch-Book • Bradford Torrey

... white women, by Terror and Rumour. Black demonised squadrons are massacring and harrying, with nameless cruelty. They fight and fire 'from behind thickets and coverts,' for the Black man loves the Bush; they rush to the attack, thousands strong, with brandished cutlasses and fusils, with caperings, shoutings and vociferation,—which, if the White Volunteer Company stands firm, dwindle into staggerings, into quick gabblement, into ...
— The French Revolution • Thomas Carlyle

... his eyes upon some secret of the marvels of God, whom he sees in every bush, in every tree, "although He is veiled from our imperfect senses" (11/6.), the vilest insect reveals to him, in the least of its actions, a ...
— Fabre, Poet of Science • Dr. G.V. (C.V.) Legros

... speculations. "If," says he, speaking of the Regicide, "they can obtain a practicable constitution, even for a limited period of time, they will be in a condition to reestablish the accustomed relations of peace and amity." Pray let us leave this bush-fighting. What is meant by a limited period of time? Does it mean the direct contrary to the terms, an unlimited period? If it is a limited period, what limitation does he fix as a ground for his opinion? Otherwise, his limitation ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VI. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... our requests to Him, for our outgoings have now been for several years at the rate of more than One Hundred Pounds each day; but though the expenses have been so great, He has never failed us. We have indeed, as to the outward appearance, like the 'Burning Bush in the Wilderness;' yet we have not been consumed. Moreover, we are full of trust in the Lord, and therefore of good courage, though we have before us the prospect, that, year by year, our expenses will increase more and more. Did all my beloved fellow disciples, who seek ...
— Answers to Prayer - From George Mueller's Narratives • George Mueller

... thought—a most desolate and unattractive spot. An open space of about half an acre was bounded on one side by a growth of wild mustard, whose slender stalks rose to more than the height of a man's head. On the other side was a grove of live-oak; and in front, the ground fell away in a rugged, bush-grown declivity. ...
— The Golden Fleece • Julian Hawthorne

... weeks, and toward its close prudent housewives dried some for winter use or preserved them in molasses. The last we gathered were the swamp, or high-bush blueberries. These had a sub-acid, delicious flavor, not unlike the smell of the swamp pink, which grew in the same spot. The black raspberry, which we called thimble berry, was found along the stone walls, ...
— Confessions of Boyhood • John Albee

... numbed, as though it had been hit with irons, while my leather clothes were torn to rags. But, by-and-by, it came to me that I could get up if I chose, and when I looked below me and saw the sheer precipice, and that nothing but a bush stood between me and it, you may be sure I scrambled back to the road quicker than a man counts two. And there I lay, trying to remember what had happened, and what my duty ...
— The Man Who Drove the Car • Max Pemberton

... and over dales he fled, As if the wind him on his wings had borne; Nor bank nor bush could stay him, when he sped His nimble feet, as treading still on thorn; Grief, and Despite, and Jealousy, and Scorn, Did all the way him follow hard behind; And he himself himself loath'd so forlorn, So shamefully forlorn of womankind, That, as a snake, ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 • Leigh Hunt

... darkens the ghost-like effect of the storm in the woods is all the more marked. The trees stand like silent specters, and at every turn in the path you come upon strange shadow shapes of shrub and bush. The snow is piling high under the hazelbrush and the sumac, stumps of trees become soft white mounds, and the little brook ...
— Some Winter Days in Iowa • Frederick John Lazell

... of our town, And he was wondrous wise: He jump'd into a bramble-bush, And scratch'd out both his eyes; And when he saw his eyes were out, With all his might and main He jump'd into another bush, And ...
— Harry's Ladder to Learning - Horn-Book, Picture-Book, Nursery Songs, Nursery Tales, - Harry's Simple Stories, Country Walks • Anonymous

... bush was brought down in rapid succession, until in ten minutes Dick calculated he had cut sufficient to last the camp-fire for the rest of the night. Then he lowered the ax and caught up a large bush, to drag it close to ...
— The Rover Boys In The Mountains • Arthur M. Winfield

... three palm-trees. It must be in a line with that clump of bushes," said his companion. "Mark that. If we, go to those bushes and then strike into the bush in a straight line from here, we shall come to it when we ...
— The Country of the Blind, And Other Stories • H. G. Wells

... our men all upon works—this afternoon Lieut. Smith came up to us again from Green Bush, & Shubal ...
— The Military Journals of Two Private Soldiers, 1758-1775 - With Numerous Illustrative Notes • Abraham Tomlinson

... sang, "Twirrr twitter, twirrr twee! In the rosiest rose-bush a rare nest! Twirrr twitter, twirrr twitter, twirrr twitter, twirrrrr tweeeee! In the fun he ...
— Poetical Works of George MacDonald, Vol. 2 • George MacDonald

... too—has been taken prisoner. Yes, sir! That's the pass things has come to, Mr. Hassenreuter. I'm a man, sir, what's tied to a women as has a brother what's bein' pursued by the criminal police an' by detectives because he killed a woman not far from the river under a lilac bush. ...
— The Dramatic Works of Gerhart Hauptmann - Volume II • Gerhart Hauptmann

... and the bells hung out in the open air between two beams. The church service was over. The congregation had passed from the house of God out into the churchyard, where then, as now, not a tree, not a bush was to be seen—not a single flower, not a garland laid upon a grave. Little knolls or heaps of earth point out where the dead are buried; a sharp kind of grass, lashed by the wind, grows over the whole churchyard. A solitary grave here and there has, perhaps, a monument; ...
— The Sand-Hills of Jutland • Hans Christian Andersen

... flowers, to look as pretty as we can, and be dull without complaining. That is my notion about the plants; they are often bored, and that is the reason why some of them have got poisonous. What do you think?" Gwendolen had run on rather nervously, lightly whipping the rhododendron bush ...
— Daniel Deronda • George Eliot

... the high road, dived into a green lane which led them, by a gradual ascent, to Mariner's Folly on the summit of the cliff. Mariner's Folly looked at a distance like an enormous bush in the shape of a lion; but, when you came nearer, you saw it was three remarkably large blackthorn-trees planted together. As they approached it at a walk, Mrs. Bazalgette ...
— Love Me Little, Love Me Long • Charles Reade

... that city the same authority does not state." Dante calls him Cain; Chaucer has him put up there as a punishment for theft, and gives him a thorn-bush to carry; Shakespeare also loads him with the thorns, but by way of compensation gives him a dog for a companion. Ordinarily, however, his offence is stated to have been, not stealing, but Sabbath-breaking,—an idea derived from the Old Testament. Like the man mentioned ...
— Myths and Myth-Makers - Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology • John Fiske

... till I was pronounced by the best judges to be the cleverest setter in the country. My master himself was a capital sportsman, and I was as proud of him as he was of me. When I had become sufficiently perfect to be his companion, we used to range together untired "over hill, over dale, through bush, through brier," he doing his part and I mine, and bringing home between us such quantities of game as no one else could boast. This was my real business, but it was no less my pleasure. I entered into it thoroughly. To point at a bird immovably till my master's never-failing ...
— Cat and Dog - Memoirs of Puss and the Captain • Julia Charlotte Maitland

... accustomed—the guns, always at work, killing—killing men and killing trees, little trees perhaps like this within her arms, little trembling trees! Out there, in this dark night, there would not be a single unscarred tree like this smooth quivering thing, no fields of corn, not even a bush or a blade of grass, no leaves to rustle and smell sweet, not a bird, no little soft-footed night beasts, except the rats; and she shuddered, thinking of the Belgian soldier-painter. Holding the tree tight, she squeezed its smooth body against her. A rush of the same helpless, hopeless ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... pockets. I kin git Virginny leaf widouten runnin' 'mong de spooks arter it. De place fer a big fine is whar de brush is tick and de Linkum men crawl away so dey woan be tromp on. Who knows but I kin fine a place whar a ginral hide hisself? Ob cose if he hab a lot of gole he'd stick it in de bush or kiver it right smart, so dat oders moutn't get it foh he could ...
— Taken Alive • E. P. Roe

... flirting chewink calls his dear Behind the bush; and very near, Where water flows, where green grass grows, Song-sparrows gently ...
— Little Rivers - A Book Of Essays In Profitable Idleness • Henry van Dyke

... defiance, Made a gesture of derision; And aloud cried Hiawatha, From the summit of the mountains: "Not so long and wide the world is, Not so rude and rough the way is, But my wrath shall overtake you, And my vengeance shall attain you!" Over rock and over river, Through bush, and brake, and forest, Ran the cunning Pau-Puk-Keewis; Like an antelope he bounded, Till he came unto a streamlet In the middle of the forest, To a streamlet still and tranquil, That had overflowed its margin, To a dam made by the beavers, To a pond of quiet water, Where knee-deep the trees were ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... could hardly have been a better one for the boys' purpose. It was placed right against the bush behind which they were hiding. The voices came to them clearly, although the speakers took ...
— The Ocean Wireless Boys And The Naval Code • John Henry Goldfrap, AKA Captain Wilbur Lawton

... romance,—if he is the theme of the Troubadour's song, he is not less celebrated among the descendants of the Saracens; his exploits are not less eagerly chanted in the tents of the children of Ishmael. To this day, when an Arab's steed starts at a bush in the desert, his master asks him if he expects to see Richard issue from the covert. He possessed that surprising personal strength and daring valour which are so highly prized by warriors in all rude periods, and united with those qualities ...
— Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 366, April, 1846 • Various

... abandoned. A clump of them grew from the side of the pit about a foot below the level of the ground. Beulah reached for them, and at the same moment the ground caved beneath her feet. She clutched at a bush in ...
— The Sheriff's Son • William MacLeod Raine

... the Bourbon papers. This calumny was started in the Institute, and is traced to Baron Huchenard, who calls his collection of MSS. 'the first in France,' and hates to be outdone by that of Astier. He tries to revenge himself by treacherous criticisms, launched, like an assegai, from the bush. 'Even my letters of Charles V.,' said Astier, 'even those they want now to prove false. And on what ground if you please? For a mere trifling error, "Maitre Rabelais" instead of "Frere Rabelais." As if an emperor's pen never made a slip! It's dishonest, that's what it is!' And, ...
— The Immortal - Or, One Of The "Forty." (L'immortel) - 1877 • Alphonse Daudet

... 544. Bush's Hiberna Curiosa. Dublin. 4to.—The materials of this work, which chiefly is occupied with a view of manners, agriculture, trade, natural curiosities, &c. were collected ...
— Robert Kerr's General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 18 • William Stevenson

... way to talk, old horse. Don't beat about the bush. Tell him exactly what you want and stand no nonsense. If you don't see what you want in the window, ask for it. Where did you ...
— Love Among the Chickens • P. G. Wodehouse

... were off, keeping in shelter of house and bush till out of sight of the council-house and the flower-picking ladies. Then we broke out. What a matchless climate! What sweet, lung-filling air! Sunshine that had no weakness in it—as if we were springing plants. Our sinews like steel ...
— Alaska Days with John Muir • Samual Hall Young

... Arthur arranged a feast for Sir Modred and his men. And as they feasted all went merrily till an adder glided out of a little bush and stung one of the knight's men. And the pain was so great, that the man quickly drew his sword to ...
— Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12) • Various

... is a penny for each of you," and he gave Bully and Bawly and Lulu and Alice each a penny, and they bought peppermint candy, so Bully and Bawly had something good to eat, even if they didn't finish the race, and the bad fish had nothing. Now, in case I see a green rose in bloom on the pink lilac bush, I'll tell you next about ...
— Bully and Bawly No-Tail • Howard R. Garis



Words linked to "Bush" :   Combretum bracteosum, bush shrike, bush tit, honeysuckle, flame bush, fever tree, stagger bush, governor plum, buckthorn, Cytesis proliferus, guinea flower, Cercis occidentalis, Chinese angelica tree, Camellia sinensis, Bassia scoparia, Genista raetam, cotton, eggplant bush, Erythroxylon coca, Desmodium motorium, brittle bush, Lyonia mariana, dog hobble, Hercules'-club, coffee rose, Caesalpinia sepiaria, Georgia bark, blueberry bush, Cytisus ramentaceus, Jew bush, capsicum, Lindera benzoin, allspice, ephedra, Chilopsis linearis, coral bush, Dacridium laxifolius, pepper bush, Halimodendron argenteum, Caesalpinia decapetala, bush nasturtium, bitter pea, angel's trumpet, Benjamin bush, Kolkwitzia amabilis, Hazardia cana, lily-of-the-valley tree, Dubya, hiccup nut, climbing hydrangea, kudu lily, render, batoko palm, desert rose, broom, cranberry, camelia, cherry laurel, East Indian rosebay, daisy bush, bryanthus, Leitneria floridana, Datura sanguinea, Lepechinia calycina, devil's walking stick, groundberry, provide, cotton-seed tree, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, hediondilla, Comptonia asplenifolia, low-bush blueberry, fool's huckleberry, bush lawyer, blolly, American spicebush, coyote bush, fire bush, dog laurel, Himalaya honeysuckle, Cajanus cajan, Anagyris foetida, blackberry bush, Aristotelia racemosa, Cestrum nocturnum, Eriodictyon californicum, George H.W. Bush, Australian heath, huckleberry, Mahonia nervosa, American angelica tree, flame pea, Hakea laurina, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, Chile hazel, Madagascar plum, catclaw, cupflower, highbush cranberry, Jacquinia keyensis, bean trefoil, lavender, oriental bush cherry, Jerusalem thorn, Kiggelaria africana, Datura arborea, blackthorn, Baccharis pilularis, Griselinia littoralis, minniebush, hemp, male berry, blueberry root, Brassaia actinophylla, Diervilla sessilifolia, bush bean, kalmia, clianthus, Croton tiglium, five-finger, castor-oil plant, Ardisia escallonoides, guava bush, lady-of-the-night, Dalmatian laburnum, pubic hair, Halimodendron halodendron, flat pea, spice bush, buddleia, Clethra alnifolia, Chiococca alba, chanar, Cordyline terminalis, silverbush, black-fronted bush shrike, Chile nut, bush baby, needle-bush, Brazilian potato tree, feijoa, corkwood, juniper bush, bitter-bark, bird's-eye bush, bush clover, laurel sumac, grevillea, Ilex cornuta, Irish gorse, Brunfelsia americana, staggerbush, chaparral broom, greasewood, hovea, leatherleaf, chanal, high-bush blueberry, common flat pea, coralberry, honeybells, black bead, currant, bush willow, Chamaecytisus palmensis, Lepidothamnus fonkii, Christmas bush, bridal-wreath, hollygrape, calliandra, Japanese allspice, chaparral, crape myrtle, Christ's-thorn, mallow, Indigofera tinctoria, poison bush, Adam's apple, crape jasmine, hydrangea, Leycesteria formosa, Mahernia verticillata, Batis maritima, blue cohosh, Japan allspice, bush jacket, mimosa bush, kapuka, German tamarisk, furze, raspberry bush, Hermannia verticillata, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, George W. Bush, honey-flower, gastrolobium, false tamarisk, bladder senna, Bush administration, jujube bush, boysenberry bush, lavender cotton, bramble bush, groundsel tree, black haw, scrub, sugar-bush, Acocanthera oblongifolia, gooseberry bush, Diervilla lonicera, ligneous plant, Cestrum diurnum, castor bean plant, coville, Brugmansia sanguinea, Vannevar Bush, corkwood tree, crepe jasmine, Acocanthera oppositifolia, alpine totara, bush league, candlewood, butcher's broom, Chilean rimu, crystal tea, California beauty, Brugmansia arborea, Jacquinia armillaris, spicebush, hawthorn, Flacourtia indica, Labrador tea, George Herbert Walker Bush, impala lily, President Bush, governor's plum, frangipani, crepe flower, cajan pea, artemisia, Apalachicola rosemary, false azalea, juneberry, groundsel bush, crepe myrtle, Erythroxylon truxiuense, flannelbush, consumption weed, lomatia, indigo, indigo plant, Griselinia lucida, Lysiloma sabicu, Graptophyllum pictum, Japanese angelica tree, maleberry, needlebush, cushion flower, butterfly flower, Embothrium coccineum, Hakea lissosperma, coca, daisybush, Lyonia lucida, jujube, Anthyllis barba-jovis, derris, dusty miller, chalice vine, cinquefoil, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, kidney wort, makomako, daphne, quail bush, forestiera, George Bush, Geoffroea decorticans, flannel bush, Aristotelia serrata, leadwort, glandular Labrador tea, Biscutalla laevigata, camellia, minnie bush, mountain fetterbush, President George W. Bush, cotton plant, ground-berry, Grewia asiatica, day jessamine, Caulophyllum thalictroides, he-huckleberry, Acalypha virginica, George Walker Bush, Ledum palustre, Dalea spinosa, ringworm bush, Dubyuh, Canella winterana, kali, squaw-bush, Brugmansia suaveolens, abelia, crepe gardenia, Catha edulis, Conradina glabra, catjang pea, lentisk, frangipanni, silver-bush, Indian currant, honey bell, California redbud, cassava, fothergilla, Benzoin odoriferum, Japanese andromeda, fire-bush, feijoa bush, Aralia spinosa, Acocanthera spectabilis, Christmas berry, glory pea, cat's-claw, fetterbush, Leiophyllum buxifolium, Aralia stipulata, barbasco, dewberry bush, andromeda, maikoa, arrow wood, lotus tree, Gaultheria shallon, fuchsia, Chimonanthus praecox, bushman's poison



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