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Break   Listen
verb
Break  v. t.  (past broke, obs. brake; past part. broken, obs. broke; pres. part. breaking)  
1.
To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock.
2.
To lay open as by breaking; to divide; as, to break a package of goods.
3.
To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate. "Katharine, break thy mind to me."
4.
To infringe or violate, as an obligation, law, or promise. " Out, out, hyena! these are thy wonted arts... To break all faith, all vows, deceive, betray."
5.
To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate; as, to break silence; to break one's sleep; to break one's journey. "Go, release them, Ariel; My charms I'll break, their senses I'll restore."
6.
To destroy the completeness of; to remove a part from; as, to break a set.
7.
To destroy the arrangement of; to throw into disorder; to pierce; as, the cavalry were not able to break the British squares.
8.
To shatter to pieces; to reduce to fragments. "The victim broke in pieces the musical instruments with which he had solaced the hours of captivity."
9.
To exchange for other money or currency of smaller denomination; as, to break a five dollar bill.
10.
To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of; as, to break flax.
11.
To weaken or impair, as health, spirit, or mind. "An old man, broken with the storms of state."
12.
To diminish the force of; to lessen the shock of, as a fall or blow. "I'll rather leap down first, and break your fall."
13.
To impart, as news or information; to broach; with to, and often with a modified word implying some reserve; as, to break the news gently to the widow; to break a purpose cautiously to a friend.
14.
To tame; to reduce to subjection; to make tractable; to discipline; as, to break a horse to the harness or saddle. "To break a colt." "Why, then thou canst not break her to the lute?"
15.
To destroy the financial credit of; to make bankrupt; to ruin. "With arts like these rich Matho, when he speaks, Attracts all fees, and little lawyers breaks."
16.
To destroy the official character and standing of; to cashier; to dismiss. "I see a great officer broken." Note: With prepositions or adverbs:
To break down.
(a)
To crush; to overwhelm; as, to break down one's strength; to break down opposition.
(b)
To remove, or open a way through, by breaking; as, to break down a door or wall.
To break in.
(a)
To force in; as, to break in a door.
(b)
To train; to discipline; as, a horse well broken in.
To break of, to rid of; to cause to abandon; as, to break one of a habit.
To break off.
(a)
To separate by breaking; as, to break off a twig.
(b)
To stop suddenly; to abandon. "Break off thy sins by righteousness."
To break open, to open by breaking. "Open the door, or I will break it open."
To break out, to take or force out by breaking; as, to break out a pane of glass.
To break out a cargo, to unstow a cargo, so as to unload it easily.
To break through.
(a)
To make an opening through, as, as by violence or the force of gravity; to pass violently through; as, to break through the enemy's lines; to break through the ice.
(b)
To disregard; as, to break through the ceremony.
To break up.
(a)
To separate into parts; to plow (new or fallow ground). "Break up this capon." "Break up your fallow ground."
(b)
To dissolve; to put an end to. "Break up the court."
To break (one) all up, to unsettle or disconcert completely; to upset. (Colloq.) Note: With an immediate object:
To break the back.
(a)
To dislocate the backbone; hence, to disable totally.
(b)
To get through the worst part of; as, to break the back of a difficult undertaking.
To break bulk, to destroy the entirety of a load by removing a portion of it; to begin to unload; also, to transfer in detail, as from boats to cars.
To break a code to discover a method to convert coded messages into the original understandable text.
To break cover, to burst forth from a protecting concealment, as game when hunted.
To break a deer or To break a stag, to cut it up and apportion the parts among those entitled to a share.
To break fast, to partake of food after abstinence. See Breakfast.
To break ground.
(a)
To open the earth as for planting; to commence excavation, as for building, siege operations, and the like; as, to break ground for a foundation, a canal, or a railroad.
(b)
Fig.: To begin to execute any plan.
(c)
(Naut.) To release the anchor from the bottom.
To break the heart, to crush or overwhelm (one) with grief.
To break a house (Law), to remove or set aside with violence and a felonious intent any part of a house or of the fastenings provided to secure it.
To break the ice, to get through first difficulties; to overcome obstacles and make a beginning; to introduce a subject.
To break jail, to escape from confinement in jail, usually by forcible means.
To break a jest, to utter a jest. "Patroclus... the livelong day breaks scurril jests."
To break joints, to lay or arrange bricks, shingles, etc., so that the joints in one course shall not coincide with those in the preceding course.
To break a lance, to engage in a tilt or contest.
To break the neck, to dislocate the joints of the neck.
To break no squares, to create no trouble. (Obs.)
To break a path, To break a road, etc., to open a way through obstacles by force or labor.
To break upon a wheel, to execute or torture, as a criminal by stretching him upon a wheel, and breaking his limbs with an iron bar; a mode of punishment formerly employed in some countries.
To break wind, to give vent to wind from the anus.
Synonyms: To dispart; rend; tear; shatter; batter; violate; infringe; demolish; destroy; burst; dislocate.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Break" Quotes from Famous Books



... leaning on a shivered lance; propped up on a lonely foot. 'Tis Ahab—his body's part; but Ahab's soul's a centipede, that moves upon a hundred legs. I feel strained, half stranded, as ropes that tow dismasted frigates in a gale; and I may look so. But ere I break, yell hear me crack; and till ye hear THAT, know that Ahab's hawser tows his purpose yet. Believe ye, men, in the things called omens? Then laugh aloud, and cry encore! For ere they drown, drowning things will twice rise to the surface; then rise again, to sink for evermore. So with Moby Dick—two ...
— Moby Dick; or The Whale • Herman Melville

... for you here, but I told him he could see you at the Bank to-morrow morning. Most impudent he was!—stared at me, and said his friend Nick had luck in wives. I don't believe he would have gone away, if Blucher had not happened to break his chain and come running round on the gravel—for I was in the garden; so I said, 'You'd better go away—the dog is very fierce, and I can't hold him.' Do you really know anything of ...
— Middlemarch • George Eliot

... first to have doubts, and whether, as some say, the great Stephen Douglas appeared on the scene as a rival and withdrew rather generously but too late, is uncertain. But Lincoln composed a letter to break off his engagement. He showed it to Joshua Speed, who told him that if he had the courage of a man he would not write to her, but see her and speak. He did so. She cried. He kissed and tried to comfort her. After this Speed had to point out ...
— Abraham Lincoln • Lord Charnwood

... long date; For who could bear to hear the glasses ring In concert clear—the chairman's ready toast— The pops of out-drawn corks—the "hip hurrah!" The eloquence of claret—and the songs, Which often through the noisy revel break, When a man—might his quietus make With a full bottle? Who would sober be, Or sip weak coffee through the live-long night; But that the dread of being laid upon That stretcher by policemen borne, on which The reveller reclines,—puzzles me much, And makes me rather tipple ginger beer, Than fly ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, October 30, 1841 • Various

... starvation and emigration, continued for two generations of men, the poor would have to go through experiences altogether novel. It is a thing that would revolutionise England; and in spite of the superior education of our labourers might lead to a break up of society. Starvation and bankruptcy make any and every man a Radical if not ...
— Speculations from Political Economy • C. B. Clarke

... a cutter two sizes smaller, and scoop out the inside, making little nests of them, and taking care not to break the bottom ...
— The Skilful Cook - A Practical Manual of Modern Experience • Mary Harrison

... mushrooms; put them into a deep saucepan with a tablespoonful of butter to each quart; stand over a quick fire, sort of tossing the saucepan. Do not stir, or you will break the mushrooms. As soon as they have reached the boiling point, push them to the back part of the stove for five minutes; serve on toast. These will be exceedingly dark, are very palatable, and perhaps are the most easily digested ...
— Studies of American Fungi. Mushrooms, Edible, Poisonous, etc. • George Francis Atkinson

... a thousand means hast thou Of mischief. Search thy fertile breast, and break The plighted peace. Breed calumnies, and sow The strife. Let youth desire, demand and take Thy weapons."—Wreathed with many a Gorgon snake, To Latium's court Alecto flew unseen, And by Amata's chamber ...
— The Aeneid of Virgil - Translated into English Verse by E. Fairfax Taylor • Virgil

... revolutionary recrudescence of 1848, I have had relations with a Jew who, from vanity, betrayed the secret of the secret societies with which he had been associated, and who warned me eight or ten days beforehand of all the revolutions which were about to break out at any point of Europe. I owe to him the unshakeable conviction that all these movements of "oppressed peoples," etc., etc., are devised by half a dozen individuals, who give their orders to the secret societies of all Europe. The ground is absolutely ...
— Secret Societies And Subversive Movements • Nesta H. Webster

... no cause to doubt, you can so easily acquit your self; but I, what shall I do? who can no more imagine who shou'd write those Boremes, than who I shall love next, if I break off ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn, Vol. III • Aphra Behn

... to be ruined before the match begins. I am!" the poor fellow insisted, turning to me when Raffles shook his head. "And it'll break my ...
— Mr. Justice Raffles • E. W. Hornung

... the end of the fortnight came, and with it the first break in the rains, little Mrs. Merryon went smiling forth ...
— The Safety Curtain, and Other Stories • Ethel M. Dell

... to be That hour was drawing nigh when he Would vengeance take ... And still more strange, O sorrow! it would bring no change Though blood for blood be spilled, and life For life be taken in fierce strife; 'Twill ne'er recall the life long sped, Or break the ...
— Elves and Heroes • Donald A. MacKenzie

... between them, and as both strove to break that silence their eyes met, and there came a quick changing of colour on the face of Helen, and Bryde's hand closed over hers. And as she sat by his side her eyes lowered, and the curling lashes sweeping her cheek, it came to the man how very beautiful she was, her pride ...
— The McBrides - A Romance of Arran • John Sillars

... affluent, the Nubra, rise in the giant glaciers to the south-west of the Karakoram pass. After the Skardo basin is left behind the descent is rapid. The river rushes down a tremendous gorge, where it appears to break through the western Himalaya, skirts Haramosh, and at a point twenty-five miles east of Gilgit bends abruptly to the south. Shortly after it is joined from the west by the Gilgit river, and here ...
— The Panjab, North-West Frontier Province, and Kashmir • Sir James McCrone Douie

... in this country when Saturday night was the big night for indoor aquatic sports and pastimes; and no gentleman as was a gentleman would call on his ladylove and break up her plans for the great weekly ceremony. There may have been a time in certain rural districts when the bathing season for males practically ended on September fifteenth, owing to the water in the horsepond becoming chilled; but that time has passed. Along ...
— Europe Revised • Irvin S. Cobb

... "High talk, indeed!" his wife exclaimed; "What, sir! shall Providence be blamed?" The Justice, laughing, said, "Oh no! I only meant the loads of snow Upon the roofs. The barn is weak; I greatly fear the roof will break. So hand me up the spade, my dear, I'll mount the barn, the roof to clear." "No!" said the wife; "the barn is high, And if you slip, and fall, and die, How will my living be secured?— Stephen, your life is not insured. But tie a rope your ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For • Various

... God's sake, be silent! It is one of those mad men of Sassun. Take care or he will come back and break our ribs for us. May he take the thing and ...
— Armenian Literature • Anonymous

... "What you say is a lie. Our Great Father sent us no such speech, he knew that the situation in which we had been placed was caused by him." The white chiefs appeared very angry at this reply and said, "We will break off the treaty and make war against you, as you ...
— Autobiography of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk • Black Hawk

... I do? If I could break off all connection with Valentin Pavlich, I should be very glad. But I see I should have thought of that before, and attended to the matter earlier; but now it's too late. It's ...
— Plays • Alexander Ostrovsky

... and closed the doors. "That does seem too dreadful to be true," she said. "The poor child's one bit of property, her only stand-by in case of need! Oh, it can't be burned; and, if it is, it must be insured. I 'm afraid a second blow would break her down completely just now, when she has not ...
— Polly Oliver's Problem • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... hexameter verses, each of which have their proper points, or particles of continuation, by which they are connected so as to form a perfect period. But when we speak by colons, we interupt their union, and, as often as occasion requires (which indeed will frequently be the case) break off with ease from this laboured and suspicious flow of language; but yet nothing should be so numerous in reality as that which appears to be least so, and yet has a forcible effect. Such is the following passage in Crassus:—"Missos ...
— Cicero's Brutus or History of Famous Orators; also His Orator, or Accomplished Speaker. • Marcus Tullius Cicero

... with a little bow, and the Englishman quickly observed that he had a peculiar gesture as though his neck had a false join on to the body just below the collar and feared it might break. Meyer of old had this trick of movement. He remembered how the ...
— Three More John Silence Stories • Algernon Blackwood

... train of mails and various details. Even when he had bolted out the other day between our legs, and was flying north with two or three cavalry brigades after him, he found time to snap up a hundred Welsh Fusiliers and break the line as he passed. He is, they say, extremely amusing, and keeps his men always in a good temper with his jests; the other day, after one of his many train captures, he sent a message to the base to say that "he was sufficiently supplied with stores now, and ...
— With Rimington • L. March Phillipps

... after wiping her eyes, "I think whether it would not be better for us both to break off the matter entirely." As she said this, she looked directly at her companion. "But then at other times I have not resolution enough for it. I cannot bear the thoughts of making him so miserable, as I know the very mention of such a thing would do. And on my own account too—so dear ...
— Persuasion • Jane Austen

... and the Prince were again at Aldershott to review the troops returned from the Crimea. But the weather, persistently wet, spoilt what would otherwise have been a joyous as well as a glorious scene. During a short break in the rain, the Crimean regiments formed three sides of a square round the carriage in which the Queen sat. The officers and four men of each of the troops that had been under fire "stepped out," and the Queen, ...
— Life of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen, (Victoria) Vol II • Sarah Tytler

... the trees at home, of the brook in the woods, of the white rose in my hand, and I longed to give it to you, but when I saw all these lovely flowers, I felt that you would not care for my one blossom, you would not understand,—" with a queer little break in her voice, Randy ceased speaking and looking up into the brilliant face was surprised to see two bright ...
— Randy and Her Friends • Amy Brooks

... like order, and of the Missionaries, has proceeded, according to the order of our Church, to ordain and install native pastors, and to perform a few other necessary ecclesiastical acts. These pastors are now called on to separate from, and break up that body, through which they received their office! The opinions and wishes of these native pastors, as well of the native Classis, and the native churches, are all ignored! Are such things right? Are these the doctrines ...
— History and Ecclesiastical Relations of the Churches of the Presbyterial Order at Amoy, China • J. V. N. Talmage

... master of all the marvels and treasures of earth. This was like the dream come true; but it distressed him. It was necessary to find the people at once. He had a feeling that his instant duty was to break some malign spell that lay upon the place—or upon himself. For one of ...
— The Lions of the Lord - A Tale of the Old West • Harry Leon Wilson

... Captain,' he said, 'you are not drinking! that is not fair.' 'Well, no, sir,' said the old fellow, 'I never drink anything on duty; you see it is one of the regulations and I subscribed them, and, of course, I could not break my word. Nick, there, will drink my share, however, when you are through; he isn't held up to quite such high accountability.' And sure enough, Nick drained off a glass and made a speech which got him a handful of quarters. Well, of ...
— The Burial of the Guns • Thomas Nelson Page

... If you intend to put 'em through their paces on me, for heaven's sake break 'em in ...
— Amphitryo, Asinaria, Aulularia, Bacchides, Captivi • Plautus Titus Maccius

... Master John, "I will break no bread. Since ye force me to this sin, I will fast for my soul's interest.—But, good mine host, I pray you of courtesy give me a cup of fair water; I shall be much ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 8 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Job the manuscripts are divided into series, according to whether or not they break off at xl. 28 of the text. The one Series gives Rashi's commentary to the end; the other, on the ground that Rashi's death prevented him from finishing his work, completes the commentary with that of ...
— Rashi • Maurice Liber

... frame as to qualify them so much as to come into contact with a civilized nation. A set of those ferocious savages with arms in their hands, left to themselves in one part of the country whilst you proceed to another, would break forth into outrages at least as bad as their former. They must, as fast as gained, (if ever they are gained,) be put under the guide, direction, and government of better Frenchmen than themselves, or they will instantly relapse into a fever ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IV. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... of the covey, which was a small one, at a single shot; but it had been a late summer, and they were not full-grown. Besides which, they roosted, I knew, about the middle of the meadow, and to shoot them near the roost would be certain to break them up, and perhaps drive them into Southlands. 'Good poachers preserve their own game:' so the birds fed safely, though a pot shot would not have seemed, the crime then that it would now. While I watched them suddenly ...
— The Amateur Poacher • Richard Jefferies

... ankle, or a bruised shoulder, or a broken head. He had broken most of the furniture in his festive hours, including the cooking-stove. "In short," as Mr. Bilkins said in relating the matter afterwards to Mrs. Bilkins, "he had broken all those things which he should n't have broken, and failed to break the one thing he ought to have ...
— A Rivermouth Romance • Thomas Bailey Aldrich

... looking-glass is said to be an ill omen, and I have certainly known many cases in which one misfortune after another has occurred to the person who has had the misfortune to break a looking-glass. Some think that because looking-glasses were once used in sorcery, they possess certain psychic properties, and that by reason of their psychic properties any injury done to a mirror must be fraught with danger to the doer of that injury, but whether ...
— Byways of Ghost-Land • Elliott O'Donnell

... of Gro. His eyes were on the lookout whether he might not once surprise in hers the brightness of the dream, and make the hidden rose of love break through the green covering and bloom in reality. He longed thus within himself once to see the day and night aspects of her soul melt into a wonderful golden twilight. But Gro made no response to the gaze ...
— Sleep Walking and Moon Walking - A Medico-Literary Study • Isidor Isaak Sadger

... these desultory remarks to a break-off. So, begging pardon once more for transgressing the limits of formality, and hoping you may live to see the verification of many of my remarks, I have the ...
— Letters of Ulysses S. Grant to His Father and His Youngest Sister, - 1857-78 • Ulysses S. Grant

... that fate has chosen you to decide our fortunes. Go, Dick, but come back to me in safety, or my poor little heart will break." ...
— The Wheel O' Fortune • Louis Tracy

... disease, and should be discarded as useless, odious, and disgusting. If congestion of the lungs or any intercurrent inflammation occurs, or the rash is much delayed, a hot water bath or the old reliable corn sweat will break up the complication with amazing rapidity, and if the head is kept cool, will not generally ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 711, August 17, 1889 • Various

... police to their assistance. But I did not expect any outside aid would be called in, for that would do the Boomsbys more harm than it would me. In a word, I did not care who came: I intended to break my way out of ...
— Down South - or, Yacht Adventure in Florida • Oliver Optic

... a sharp one, you are!" said Rhoda, with an approving nod. "Look here, Mr. Denzil, would you break a promise?" ...
— The Silent House • Fergus Hume

... master forgave her carelessness; he said he was sure she reproached herself enough for it, as indeed she did, and the more so when her master spoke to her so kindly; she cried as if her heart would break; and all that could be done to comfort her, was to set her to work as hard as possible for ...
— Tales & Novels, Vol. 2 • Maria Edgeworth

... collections of the period which preceded it, have both been productive of serious damage. The collector is, or rather often was, a barbarian who did not hesitate, when he saw a chance of adding to his collection of specimens and rare remains, to mutilate monuments, to dissect manuscripts, to break up whole archives, in order to possess himself of the fragments. On this score many acts of vandalism were perpetrated before the Revolution. Naturally, the revolutionary procedure of confiscation and transference was also productive of lamentable consequences; besides ...
— Introduction to the Study of History • Charles V. Langlois

... his feet on the side-ropes—easy and safe enough, doubtless, with his preliminary acrobatic training, but blood-curdling to the breathless spectators beneath. He left drawings for a jointed bar which, at the proper time, should apparently break in two and leave him dangling to one of the pieces. For a consideration which the citizens of Binghamton, New York, sensibly declined to give he offered to ascend to the height of a mile in a paper balloon, there set fire to it and descend ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 26, August, 1880 - of Popular Literature and Science • Various

... for the constant cough which attends some forms of aortic aneurism. The pulmonary arteries and veins are also liable to obstruction from the tumour. This will occur the more certainly if the aneurism spring from the right or the inferior side of the arch, and if the tumour should not break at an early period, slow absorption, caused by pressure of the tumour, may destroy even the vertebral column, and endanger the spinal nervous centre. If the tumour spring from the left side or the fore part of the arch, it may in time ...
— Surgical Anatomy • Joseph Maclise

... King. "I'll have no clumsy beasts enter my palace, to overturn and break all my pretty nick-nacks. When the rest of your friends are transformed you can return to the upper world, and go about ...
— Ozma of Oz • L. Frank Baum

... the houses. The sargento-mayor ordered them to march toward that place, where they arrived at daybreak; and there they remained about half an hour, waiting for the dawn to brighten so that they might break the countersign [87] and make the daylight attack [dar el albasso] on the said village, which they did. For when it became light, and the day was brightening, they broke the watchword, which was "St. Ignatius;" and the division to which that belonged made the first attack ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume 41 of 55, 1691-1700 • Various

... requirements to-day. Of portable objects of value—plate, jewels, statuettes of precious metals and the like—belonging to the late owner, there is certainly no trace, for Signor Fiorelli's labourers were not the first to break the deep silence of this buried mansion. For it was the survivors of the stricken town, the citizens of Pompeii themselves, who were the foremost pioneers to excavate, and they carried off every work of art they could conveniently remove. ...
— The Naples Riviera • Herbert M. Vaughan

... the locust's flowery plume, The birch's pale-green scarf, And break the web of brier and bloom From name ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 11, Issue 67, May, 1863 • Various

... Guy told us, not an incident occurred to break the monotony of that existence of eleven years—not even the reappearance of the islanders, who were kept away from Tsalal by superstitious terror. No danger had threatened them during all that time; but, of course, as it became more and more prolonged, ...
— An Antarctic Mystery • Jules Verne

... among birds that the notes of joy in love break out with a wonderful fascination. They are the most perfect of lovers; strength is often quite set aside, and the eye and ear of the mate alone is appealed to. The males (and also, in some cases, the females) use many aesthetic ...
— The Truth About Woman • C. Gasquoine Hartley

... more tenderly mournful than that of Sarah Curran, the beloved of Robert Emmet. The graceful prose of Washington Irving, the poignant verses of Moore, have enshrined the memory of her, weeping for him in the shadow of the scaffold, dying of heart-break at last in a far-off land. No more need be said of her, for whom the pity of the whole world has been awakened by song allied to sweetest, saddest music. What of Anne Devlin, Emmet's faithful servant, helping in his preparations for insurrection, aiding his flight, shielding him in hiding, ...
— The Glories of Ireland • Edited by Joseph Dunn and P.J. Lennox

... a stone, still holding the rod very tight, and wiped his heated brow. Then, starting up, he tried for the next ten minutes to pull the fish out of the hole by main force, of course never venturing to pull so hard as to break the line. He went up the stream and pulled, down the stream and pulled, he even waded across the stream at a shallow part and pulled, but all in vain. The fish was in that condition which ...
— Freaks on the Fells - Three Months' Rustication • R.M. Ballantyne

... central difficulty is an irritable and easily exhausted store of energy. They are easily excited and excitement burns them out; that is the long and short of their situation. Sex, love, hatred, anger, strain, fear in all its forms, illness,—all these and many other emotions and happenings may break them down. Such people, and those who care for them, must not make the mistake of thinking that rough handling, strenuosity, will cure what ...
— The Foundations of Personality • Abraham Myerson

... getting home, she came into the surgery looking very perturbed, and could hardly find words to break a certain piece of news to him. It appeared that not an hour previously, Jinny, flushed and tearful, had lain on her neck, confessing her feelings for John and hinting at the belief that ...
— Australia Felix • Henry Handel Richardson

... inefficiency, you would drive up to the bank in a taxi, walk in and return the money, saying you had found it in the old family pew at Trinity when you went in to say your prayers! Here would be an opportunity to break the force of habit ...
— Blacksheep! Blacksheep! • Meredith Nicholson

... at break of day, having sent before him the Baliares and other light-armed troops, crossed the river, and placed his troops in line of battle, as he had conveyed them across the river. The Gallic and Spanish cavalry he placed in the left wing, opposite the Roman cavalry: the right ...
— The History of Rome; Books Nine to Twenty-Six • Titus Livius

... meetings the Resolution has been affirmed: "The people who suffer by the trade ought to have a veto against it."—Those who seem resolved to oppose every scheme which seeks to break down and restrict this horrible vice, tauntingly reply, that this measure would ensure its continuance in its worst centres. They do but show their own unwisdom herein. The Publicans know far better, and they avow, there is nothing they so much dread ...
— Memoir and Letters of Francis W. Newman • Giberne Sieveking

... time, Blucher was really believed to be deranged for several years previous to the outbreak of the war of liberation.] But it is assuredly no madness that makes me act in this manner, as stupid fools assert, but it is simply a way in which I relieve my anger, that it may not break my heart. It is the same as if a man who has to fight a duel should take fencing-lessons, and practise with the sword, in order to hit his adversary. But I have satisfied my anger, and will again be as gentle as ...
— NAPOLEON AND BLUCHER • L. Muhlbach

... be broken lightly. The negro does not want to leave the South. The only thing to break this tie is unfair and cruel treatment of the negro on the part of the white man. In this connection our white friends should know that not only in the lynchings, and in the courts and in the unwholesome conditions on the southern ...
— Negro Migration during the War • Emmett J. Scott

... determined to "break camp" soon after the matin meal had been comfortably dispatched. This did not promise to be an extraordinary feat, since they were trying to go light-handed on this expedition, and did not have many of their ordinary "traps" along, from a tent down to certain cooking utensils that had been deemed ...
— At Whispering Pine Lodge • Lawrence J. Leslie

... and wide for the beautiful "holly berries" with which to decorate our homes at Christmas. When we have found a berry-laden bush, we eagerly break off the branches and bear them home in triumph. The bush, once so gay with berries, is a sad-looking thing when we are through with it. The branches are broken so far back that next year it will bear few berries and we ...
— Conservation Reader • Harold W. Fairbanks

... the train of such memories as those just gathered, may perhaps seem over-strained—though they really to my own eyes cause the images to multiply. Still others of these break in upon me and refuse to be slighted; reconstituting as I practically am the history of my fostered imagination, for whatever it may be worth, I won't pretend to a disrespect for any contributive ...
— A Small Boy and Others • Henry James

... of the building it was not gratified. No human figure came to enliven this sad, lonely dwelling. All the windows were closed, as if the house were uninhabited. The baying of dogs, probably imprisoned in their kennel, was the only sound which came to break the strange silence, and the distant thunder, with its dull rumbling, repeated by the echoes, responded plaintively, and gave a lugubrious character to ...
— Gerfaut, Complete • Charles de Bernard

... should not be materially weakened until I am near Columbia, when you may be governed by the situation of affairs about Charleston. If you can break the railroad between this and Charleston, then this force ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... in every direction, and the risk has been universal. The city has been in the dark during these days, without patrol or watch; and many malefactors have taken advantage of this opportunity to use the murderous poniard without risk, and with the utmost perfidy. At the break of day horrible spectacles were seen, of groups of dogs disputing the remains of a man, a woman, and a child." The "Cosmopolite" goes on to insist upon the necessity of forming a new ministry and of a reform in the ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon de la Barca

... seems to have been a savage of considerable merit, and a firm believer in capital punishment, subdued the Islands to his own rule, but he did not aim to break the power of the chiefs over their people. He established a few general laws, and insisted on peace, order, and obedience to himself. By right of his conquest all lands were supposed to be owned by him; he gave to one chief and took away from ...
— Northern California, Oregon, and the Sandwich Islands • Charles Nordhoff

... and time. I listen'd, And her words stole with most prevailing sweetness Into my heart, as thronged fancies come, All unawares, into the poet's brain; Or as the dew-drops on the petal hung, When summer winds break their soft sleep with sighs, Creep down into the bottom of the flower. Her words were like a coronal of wild blooms Strung in the very negligence of Art, Or in the art of Nature, where each rose Doth faint ...
— The Suppressed Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Alfred Lord Tennyson

... may more properly be called the French Acadians. These would undoubtedly have proved very valuable subjects to the English, and extreamly useful to them in improving a dominion so susceptible of all manner of improvement as Acadia, (Nova-Scotia) if they could have been, prevailed on to break their former ties of allegiance to the king of France, and to have remained quietly under the new government to which they were now transferred. But from this they were constantly dissuaded, and withheld by the influence of our French priests, cantoned, ...
— An Account Of The Customs And Manners Of The Micmakis And Maricheets Savage Nations, Now Dependent On The Government Of Cape-Breton • Antoine Simon Maillard

... what you are saying?" he heard the harshness of his voice break. "For God's sake, child, let me hear ...
— Robin • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... way," he said, "or I'll go away at once." He was summoning all his courage and hoping she wasn't going to break down and cry. How little she was, and sweet! Her eyes pleaded, just as they did in that one look in the church. How could anybody ...
— Exit Betty • Grace Livingston Hill

... presiding officer were, "Where is Susan B. Anthony?" and the demonstration that followed the question was the most unexpected and overwhelming incident of the gathering. The entire audience rose, men jumped on their chairs, and the cheering continued without a break for ten minutes. Every second of that time I seemed to see Miss Anthony, alone in her hotel room, longing with all her big heart to be with us, as we longed to have her. I prayed that the loss of a tribute which would ...
— The Story of a Pioneer - With The Collaboration Of Elizabeth Jordan • Anna Howard Shaw

... Prince Nicolaus. He was a man of unbounded energy himself, and he expected everybody in his service to be energetic too. There is nothing to suggest that Haydn neglected any of his routine duties, which certainly gave him abundant opportunity to "break the legs of time," but once, at least—in 1765—his employer taxed him with lack of diligence in composition, as well as for failing to maintain the necessary discipline among the musicians under his charge. It is likely enough that Haydn was not a rigid disciplinarian; but it must have been a mere ...
— Haydn • J. Cuthbert Hadden

... after a particularly bad night (and morning) as he sat staring into the dead ashes of his fireplace. "He wanted to take my life—until my good angel interfered and saved me. Now does he want to break me financially? By Jove! they're coming near to doing it among them. I shall have to go to Moss to-morrow for another L250. Well, what does it matter? The luck must turn some time. If it doesn't?—if it doesn't?—then there may come the trip before the mast, as the final panacea, ...
— Prince Fortunatus • William Black

... said. They liked to have a talk with Lizzie, and to turn over her fashion-books, old and new, and perhaps to plan, next time they had new frocks, how the sleeves should be made. It was a pleasant "object" for their walk, a break in the monotony, and gave them something to talk about. They went in one afternoon, shortly after the events which have been described. Chatty had occasion for a strip of muslin stamped for working, to complete some of her new underclothing which she had been ...
— A Country Gentleman and his Family • Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant

... the second sojourn had commenced badly. Still, he had promised to marry her, and he must marry her. Better a lifetime of misery and insolvency than a failure to behave as a gentleman should. Of course, if she chose to break it off.... But he must be minutely careful to do nothing which might lead to a breach. Such was Denry's code. The walk home at midnight, amid the reverberations of the falling tempest, was marked by a slight pettishness on the part of Ruth, and by ...
— The Card, A Story Of Adventure In The Five Towns • Arnold Bennett

... gain is every where sapping pure and generous feeling, and every where raises up bitter foes against any reform which may threaten to turn aside a stream of wealth. I sometimes feel as if a great social revolution were necessary to break up our present mercenary civilisation, in order that Christianity, now repelled by the almost universal worldliness, may come into new contact with the soul, and may reconstruct society after its own pure and disinterested principles." Channing's Letter ...
— Diary in America, Series Two • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... before. The rosy-colored accounts we have had of Turkish Progress are for the most part mere delusions. The Sultan is a well-meaning but weak man, and tyrannical through his very weakness. Had he strength enough to break through the meshes of falsehood and venality which are woven so close about him, he might accomplish some solid good. But Turkish rule, from his ministers down to the lowest cadi, is a monstrous system of ...
— The Lands of the Saracen - Pictures of Palestine, Asia Minor, Sicily, and Spain • Bayard Taylor

... whom you have seen at the Duchess of Grafton's, carries this, or I should not venture being so explicit. Wherever the storm may break out at first, I think Lord Bute cannot escape his share of it. The Bedfords may triumph over him, the Princess, and still higher, if they are fortunate enough to avoid the present ugly appearances; and yet how the load of odium will be increased, if they return to power! ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole Volume 3 • Horace Walpole

... household while he, the colonel, had no hold there except by the extremely hypothetical tie of his mendacious affection for Sylvie, which it was not yet clear that Sylvie reciprocated. When the lawyer told him of the priest's manoeuvre, and advised him to break with Sylvie and marry Pierrette, he certainly flattered Gouraud's foible; but after analyzing the inner purpose of that advice and examining the ground all about him, the colonel thought he perceived in his ally the intention of separating him from Sylvie, and profiting ...
— The Celibates - Includes: Pierrette, The Vicar of Tours, and The Two Brothers • Honore de Balzac

... it says," she said, and read: "'Mrs. Forbes ill and unable communicate by telephone. Come at once. Manager Royal Devonshire Hotel.'" Then she added, with a suspicious break in her voice: "That sounds serious enough, ...
— Number Seventeen • Louis Tracy

... stood silent. The people were silent. Aunt Indiana gave her puncheon seat a push to break the force of that silence, ...
— In The Boyhood of Lincoln - A Tale of the Tunker Schoolmaster and the Times of Black Hawk • Hezekiah Butterworth

... scattered throughout the country by Germany, hold the Austrian and Hungarian population in a union which neither the hardships of war, the death of the Emperor nor the inspiration of the outside influences, such as the Russian revolution, can break. ...
— Kelly Miller's History of the World War for Human Rights • Kelly Miller

... civilization constantly brings before the mind, without giving any opportunity for a mastery of many of them; the fierce rivalries of interest, and the enervating habits of body which are constantly being formed or perpetuated—all alike and together tend to break down an acquired power of Attention. It is said that Alexander Hamilton used to go through the demonstrations of Euclid's Geometry before the commencement of each Session of the early Congress. For what purpose? ...
— Assimilative Memory - or, How to Attend and Never Forget • Marcus Dwight Larrowe (AKA Prof. A. Loisette)

... first rising, till his going to bed, as thus for example: We will suppose it to be after Christmas, and about plow-day (which is the first letting out of the plough) and at what time men either begin to fallow, or to break up pease earth, which is to lie to bait, according to the custome of the country; at this time the plough-man shall rise before foure of the clocke in the morning, and after thankes given to God for his ...
— Agriculture in Virginia, 1607-1699 • Lyman Carrier

... office, others underran the cable, cut in near the shore end, and after finding communication satisfactory with Cebu and Liloan, located the fault, the ship's volt-meter indicating when the small boat underrunning the cable came to the break. It proved to be a defective factory joint, which was cut out and repaired, so that by three o'clock communication was established ...
— A Woman's Journey through the Philippines - On a Cable Ship that Linked Together the Strange Lands Seen En Route • Florence Kimball Russel

... of a serious nature break out in your town, whose immediate duty would it be to quell it? Suppose this duty should prove too difficult to ...
— Civil Government in the United States Considered with - Some Reference to Its Origins • John Fiske

... right of him to see if he was followed. And he fancied he could see five or six hulking follows dogging his footsteps. Instinctively he drew nearer to his master, but not for the world would he have dared to break in on the conversation of which the fragments ...
— Rubur the Conqueror • Jules Verne

... see God only in what is strange and rare: but this is faith, to see God in what is most common and simple; to know God's greatness not so much from disorder, as from order; not so much from those strange sights in which God seems (but only seems) to break his laws, as from those common ones in which he ...
— Town and Country Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... that counted. There was no acting in it as in Henley's or in Whistler's—no burying of his head in his hands and violent gestures—no well-placed laugh and familiar phrase. The talk came in a steady stream, laughter occasionally in the voice, but no break, no movement, no dramatic action—the sanest doctrine set forth with almost insane ingenuity, for he was always the "wild dog outside the kennel" who wouldn't imitate and hence kept free, as Louis ...
— Nights - Rome, Venice, in the Aesthetic Eighties; London, Paris, in the Fighting Nineties • Elizabeth Robins Pennell

... at this point modern voices will want to break in on me with appropriate quotations from Bernard Shaw and others, and try to silence me by pointing out what a mean, petty, dull, sickly, and stodgy thing mere domesticity can be. Yes! it can be all that for people who let it be all that. Even love that once was passionate cannot redeem ...
— Men, Women, and God • A. Herbert Gray

... way, I explained the whole situation to the Princess and read her the letters. She was amazed—and her indignation was intense. Nor did she hesitate to express it freely before Bernheim. And I saw his stern face break into a glad smile. It ...
— The Colonel of the Red Huzzars • John Reed Scott

... air of supreme respectability, the consciousness, small, still, reserved, but none the less distinct and diffused, of private honour. The air of supreme respectability—that was a strange blank wall for his adventure to have brought him to break his nose against. It had in fact, as he was now aware, filled all the approaches, hovered in the court as he passed, hung on the staircase as he mounted, sounded in the grave rumble of the old bell, as little electric as ...
— The Ambassadors • Henry James

... Emissaries sped to and fro between the Jacobin Club and the Common Hall, and between these two centres and each of the forty-eight sections. It is one of the inscrutable mysteries of this delirious night, that Hanriot did not at once use the force at his command to break up the Convention. There is no obvious reason why he should not have done so. The members of the Convention had re-assembled after their dinner, towards seven o'clock. The hall which had resounded with the shrieks and yells of the furious gladiators of the factions all day, now lent ...
— Critical Miscellanies (Vol. 1 of 3) - Essay 1: Robespierre • John Morley

... who are not used to handling money have been swindled by what is known as "Imitation Money." The United States Treasury Department is making strenuous efforts to break up the practice of issuing imitations of the national currency, to which many commercial colleges and business firms are addicted. This bogus currency has been extensively used by sharpers all over the country to swindle ignorant people and ...
— Disputed Handwriting • Jerome B. Lavay

... half of the boundary with Ethiopia is a provisional administrative line; in the Ogaden, regional states have established a variety of conflicting relationships with the Transitional National Government in Mogadishu, feuding factions in Puntland region, and the economically stabile break-away "Somaliland" region; Djibouti maintains economic ties and border accords with "Somaliland" leadership while politically supporting Somali Transitional National Government in Mogadishu; arms smuggling and Oromo rebel activities prompt strict ...
— The 2002 CIA World Factbook • US Government

... of a sordid humanity disappear. The Loafer is alone with the south-west wind and the blue sky. Only a carolling of larks and a tinkling from distant flocks break the brooding noonday stillness; above, the wind-hover hangs motionless, a black dot on the blue. Prone on his back on the springy turf, gazing up into the sky, his fleshy integument seems to drop away, and the spirit ranges at will among the tranquil clouds. This ...
— Pagan Papers • Kenneth Grahame

... pulls the great door and the central window of the floor above into an impressive composition. The facade of the house, instead of being a commonplace rectangle of stone broken by windows, has this long connected break of the door and balcony and window. By such simple devices ...
— The House in Good Taste • Elsie de Wolfe

... that the station break came, and the thirteen witches, trademark of the International Witch ...
— Prologue to an Analogue • Leigh Richmond

... said Fanny, beckoning a boy she saw at a distance, "come and shake hands with Mr. Touchett." It was from instinct rather than reason; there was a fencing between Rachel and the curate that made her uncomfortable, and led her to break it off by any means in her power; and though Mr. Touchett was not much at his ease with the little boy, this discussion was staged off. But again Mr. Touchett made bold to say that in case Lady Temple ...
— The Clever Woman of the Family • Charlotte M. Yonge

... been in most Casual Wards in London; was in the one in Macklin Street, Drury Lane, last week. They keep you two nights and a day, and more than that if they recognise you. You have to break 10 cwt. of stone, or pick four pounds of oakum. Both are hard. About thirty a night go to Macklin Street. The food is 1 pint gruel and 6 oz. bread for breakfast; 8 oz. bread and 1 1/2 oz. cheese for dinner; tea same as breakfast. No supper. It is not enough to do the work on. Then you are obliged ...
— "In Darkest England and The Way Out" • General William Booth

... ascertain the expense of the present war, supposing it to continue as long as former wars have done, and the funding system not to break up before that period. The expense of the preceding war was 108 millions, the half of which (54) makes 162 millions for the expense of the present war. It gives symptoms of going beyond this sum, supposing the funding system not to break ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... swooped in for a landing on the crimson Martian sands. Captain Bobby Taylor took up a position before the air-lock and briefed his second-in-command, Ronnie Smith. "We're surrounded by enemy aliens, Smith," announced Captain Taylor. "Better break out the death-ray pistols. Our mission is to destroy every metal monster on this planet. Look at 'em come! They got eight legs and ...
— The Amazing Mrs. Mimms • David C. Knight

... "It will break her heart," I said, with a sharp twinge of conscience and a cowardly shrinking from the unpleasant duty ...
— The Doctor's Dilemma • Hesba Stretton

... "My father would sooner break his leg than carry an edged tool through the house," Mrs. Kelso affirmed. "Three times I have known it to bring sickness. I ...
— A Man for the Ages - A Story of the Builders of Democracy • Irving Bacheller

... it looks pretty black?" he asked her, breathing quick; "there he is, getting round an old man, and plotting for money he's no right to! Wouldn't you have thought that any decent fellow would sooner break stones than take the money that ought to have been that girl's—that at least he'd have said to Melrose 'provide for her first—your own child—and then do what you like for me.' Wouldn't that have been the honest thing to do? But I went to him ...
— The Mating of Lydia • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... that them straight-cut mouth corners of hers ain't set near so hard as I thought. Her eyes ain't throwin' off sparks, either. They're sort of dewy, in fact. And when she does speak again there's a break in ...
— Wilt Thou Torchy • Sewell Ford

... he contents himself with the English tongue here in England, he is one of the most picturesque talkers to be met with. I can remember a certain dinner-party, now many years ago, where the great traveller kept us all listening till long past day-break; narrating, as he did, the most singular adventures with the most vivid fidelity to facts. That, however, is a digression. I have only to add that Captain Burton has the names of many subscribers and will doubtless be glad to receive others which may, ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... nightfall when the French cruiser moved slowly between the other vessels of the allied fleet, heading for the enemy. Not a light shone aboard the vessel, and there was not a sound to break the ...
— The Boy Allies Under Two Flags • Ensign Robert L. Drake

... first to break the silence that followed this astounding intelligence. "Then," she said, "Besworth is not to be thought of. You ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... bitter root penetrates where heat and drought affect it not, nor nibbling rabbits, moles, grubs of insects, and other burrowers break through and steal. Cut off the upper portion only with your knife, and not one, but several, plants will likely sprout from what remains; and, however late in the season, will economize stem and leaf to produce flowers ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... had to break the matter to Georgy, who made a loud outcry. Everybody had new clothes at Christmas. The others would laugh at him. He would have new clothes. She had promised them to him. The poor widow had only kisses to give him. She darned the old ...
— Vanity Fair • William Makepeace Thackeray

... when the man ceased from discoursing on friendship—a favorite theme among Spenersbergers, he began to think—and glad to break away from his work, for he held his pencil less firmly than ...
— Lippincott's Magazine Of Popular Literature And Science, No. 23, February, 1873, Vol. XI. • Various

... Roberts!" cried the lieutenant. "Why should there be one? There is neither campong nor sampan upon the river, and it is evident that there is no trade. No, Roberts, we have been tricked—cheated, and we must get back at full speed as soon as day begins to break. I have been uncomfortable for hours now, as I felt that our poor friends could never have come through such a forest as this. It ...
— Middy and Ensign • G. Manville Fenn

... went yesterday to the Sistine Chapel, it being my first visit. It is a room of noble proportions, lofty and long, though divided in the midst by a screen or partition of white marble, which rises high enough to break the effect of spacious unity. There are six arched windows on each side of the chapel, throwing down their light from the height of the walls, with as much as twenty feet of space (more I should think) between them and the floor. The entire walls ...
— Passages From the French and Italian Notebooks, Complete • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... to part with a cat like that, but it was hard to part with anything in Ronda. Yet we made the break, and instead of ruining over the precipitous face of the rock where the city stands, as we might have expected, we glided smoothly down the long grade into the storm-swept lowlands sloping to the sea. They grew more fertile as we descended and after we had left a mountain valley where the mist hung ...
— Familiar Spanish Travels • W. D. Howells

... his foreign pillow the china bowl in which broth was served. Kano whispered his discovery to the nurse, and when she wondered, explained to her with shivering earnestness that it was undoubtedly the boy's intention to break it against the iron bedstead the first moment he was left alone, and with a shard sever one of his veins. Tatsu grinned like a trapped badger when it was wrested from him, and said that he would find a way in spite of them all. After ...
— The Dragon Painter • Mary McNeil Fenollosa

... by a loll, if not a siesta, that they might be in trim for the evening's enjoyment (Christmas lasted a whole week at Ridgeley) when four strapping field hands, barefooted, that their tramp might not break the epicurean slumbers, brought down from the desolate upper chamber a rough pine coffin, manufactured and screwed tight by the plantation carpenter, and after halting a minute in the back porch to pull on their boots, took their way across the lawn and fields to ...
— At Last • Marion Harland

... (That a good pianist could be hired for a small sum in England was a matter of amusement to Artemus. More especially when he found a gentleman obliging enough to play anything he desired, such as break-downs and airs which had the most absurd relation to the scene they were used to illustrate. In the United States his pianist was desirous of playing music of a superior order, much against ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 6 • Charles Farrar Browne

... much to his dissatisfaction, Bryant secreted his papers, note-books, and maps, the theft of which would be an extremely serious loss. Menocal probably would not instigate open lawlessness, but his hirelings might break into the house on their own initiative. And this was not unlikely since a bitter feeling was systematically being aroused against Bryant and his project among ...
— The Iron Furrow • George C. Shedd

... a village, the tale would be a sad and melancholy one. But I have brought before you the condition of millions of women. And when you think that the masses of these women live in the rural districts; that they grow up in rudeness and ignorance; that their former masters are using few means to break up their hereditary degradation, you can easily take in the pitiful condition of this population and forecast the inevitable future to multitudes of females, unless a mighty special effort is made for the improvement of the black womanhood ...
— The American Missionary, Vol. XLII. April, 1888. No. 4. • Various

... argued Trevethick. "What was the Firefly to her that she should think she saw her drive into the bay, and break to pieces against the rock out yonder? And why should she tell ...
— Bred in the Bone • James Payn

... "Did somebody break it?" asked Bert. Once he had broken a plate of which his mother was very proud, and he ...
— Bobbsey Twins in Washington • Laura Lee Hope

... the words of poet or sage, might have shared the affection which they inspired. So might the papyrus roll of the Egyptian, and so does even to-day the parchment book of the middle ages, whenever its fortunate owner has the soul of a booklover. From this book our own was derived, yet not without a break. For our book is not so much a copy of the Roman and medieval book as a "substitute" for it, a machine product made originally to sell at a large profit for the price of hand-work. It was fortunate ...
— The Booklover and His Books • Harry Lyman Koopman

... had seen others in the West, who had made good, breaking soil they owned and walking with the confident step of self-respecting men. On the plains, stubborn labor was rewarded, but one needed pluck to leave all one knew and break custom's ...
— Lister's Great Adventure • Harold Bindloss

... laid her upon her bed. It was Jenny who washed her, wrapped her in clean linen—no one else should touch her; Ben who sat by her, with hardly a break, until the day that she was buried, wiped out with self-reproach, grief; desolate as ...
— The Best British Short Stories of 1922 • Various



Words linked to "Break" :   cease, fragmentise, break wind, reclaim, severance, confide, chance event, abandon, infringe, express emotion, conk out, capillary fracture, freeze, break short, give up, breakout, eclipse, disassociate, weaken, conform to, fragmentize, offend, take five, insert, catch one's breath, cash in one's chips, disunite, lay off, solve, conflict, kick the bucket, get, dead air, trip the light fantastic, give out, go on, fatigue fracture, snuff it, cracking, bog, bring out, give-up the ghost, disjoint, interpolation, stress fracture, exit, annul, military, switch, demote, reveal, blunder, intermit, breaking off, develop, outgo, change, bog down, interruption, violate, break-axe, break of the day, armed forces, sin, get out, change integrity, disperse, shot, end, come out of the closet, let out, terminate, impacted fracture, buy the farm, reduce, breakage, infract, divulge, give the gate, repair, splintering, break apart, divorce, damp, gaolbreak, quit, babble out, slide down, deaden, abatement, detach, relegate, cut short, punctuation, break into, break away, go bad, malfunction, frazzle, dampen, erupt, emerge, expose, crush, drop the ball, detachment, give the bounce, implode, invalidate, sink, hold on, go off, time-out, complete fracture, disruption, caesura, breakup, perish, discontinue, split, secede, compression fracture, rest period, nullify, smashing, natural event, dilapidate, penetrate, croak, give way, diphthongize, give, void, exchange, tell, convert, chink, flee, interval, falling out, alteration, service break, change state, make, rest, hap, break bread, dissociate, puncture, sprint, break dance, break of day, let the cat out of the bag, barracking, billiards, break one's back, separate, leak out, appear, trip the light fantastic toe, domesticize, take place, expire, San Andreas Fault, holdup, blackwash, break of serve, work out, incomplete fracture, drop dead, closed fracture, choke, turn, go against, suspend, break up, separation, burst, shift, check, fortuity, founder, ruin, get away, spill the beans, run afoul, outdo, betray, discover, tattle, outmatch, relief, flight, change of integrity, rift, die, fissure, heckling, muckrake, crash, comminuted fracture, break open, displaced fracture, fly in the teeth of, reprieve, fragment, fray, ladder, sing, dissipate, run, take flight, pass away, give the axe, score, crumble, assign, commute, exceed, breakable, better, fly, rupture, blab, war machine, outstrip, time interval



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